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Lenovo brings Linux to its P-series ThinkPads and ThinkStations

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Linux

In the past, Lenovo has flirted with Linux, but now the company is making the operating system a much bigger part of its product lineup. Starting this month and moving into the summer, it will begin certifying its P-series ThinkPad and ThinkStation workstation computers for the operating system. Specifically, you (or more likely the company you work for) will be able to configure those devices with the enterprise versions of Red Hat and Ubuntu.

As part of the process, Lenovo will provide full web support for those computers, as well as offer configuration advice and host a dedicated Linux forum where customers can troubleshooting help. To be clear, Lenovo isn’t making Linux an option throughout its entire lineup — so you won't be able to configure your next ThinkPad X1 Carbon with the operating system, for example.

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Also: Lenovo is certifying its Think workstations to run Linux

Lenovo Announces Plan to Sell Ubuntu on Even More ThinkPads

  • Lenovo Announces Plan to Sell Ubuntu on Even More ThinkPads

    Lenovo is already well represented within the Linux hardware community having ‘certified’ a swathe of its devices for various different distros over the years.

    And the company recently revealed plans to sell laptops preloaded with Fedora and make more firmware updates available through the vendor-neutral Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS).

    But now it’s going even further with the Linux love.

Lenovo Adding Linux Option to ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series

  • Lenovo Adding Linux Option to ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series

    If you purchase a non-Apple desktop PC or laptop, chances are it's going to be running Windows 10 with very few exceptions. Lenovo is expanding on the available alternatives, though, by introducing support and certification for Linux on some of its Think-branded hardware this summer.

    Lenovo has committed to offering the complete line-up of ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series models with the option of Linux coming pre-installed. More specifically, a choice of Red Hat Enterprise Linux or Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) will be offered. Alongside that, Lenovo is promising "full end-to-end support," which means these models will continue to receive security patches and software updates, firmware and BIOS updates, and drivers. In fact, Lenovo intends to produce drivers which can then be integrated into the Linux kernel.

Lenovo To Certify Their Full ThinkPad/ThinkStation Line

  • Lenovo To Certify Their Full ThinkPad/ThinkStation Line For Linux

    Back in April was the announcement that Lenovo would begin shipping some devices with Fedora Linux while now the story gets much juicier today.

    Lenovo announced today that they are planning to certify their full workstation portfolio for "top Linux distributions from Ubuntu and Red Hat - every model, every configuration."

    Lenovo plans to certify their complete ThinkPad and ThinkStation workstation portfolio for Linux moving forward. The ThinkPad P series in particular is what they plan to certify and the complete ThinkStation line-up.

Ubuntu & Red Hat on their entire ThinkStation and ThinkPad P....

  • Lenovo adding Ubuntu & Red Hat on their entire ThinkStation and ThinkPad P lines

    Today, hardware vendor Lenovo announced something quite huge for the Linux community with the addition of more Linux devices becoming easily available.

    Back in April, it was announced that Lenovo and Fedora were teaming up to bring Fedora Linux to a few different ThinkPad models. That by itself was quite big. Now they're going a massive step further by announcing both Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Ubuntu LTS will be certified and available across their entire ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series workstations.

Lenovo now offers Linux on all of its workstation PCs,,,

  • Lenovo now offers Linux on all of its workstation PCs (desktop and laptop)

    To be clear, there was nothing stopping customers from purchasing a system with Windows and then replacing the operating system with their GNU/Linux distribution of choice. But now that Lenovo is offering certified support for Ubuntu and Red Hat, you can be pretty sure you won’t have to jump through hoops to make sure you have all the proper drivers for your hardware.

    The company says it’ll also be offering upstream device drivers for inclusion in the Linux kernel, which should help with long-term support (and which should also help if you opt for a different Linux-based operating system).

Lenovo Duet: Chrome OS Shines on Innovative 2-in-1

  • Lenovo Duet: Chrome OS Shines on Innovative 2-in-1

    The Duet, released last month, is Lenovo’s attempt to fill that niche with a new Chromebook form factor that runs Android and Linux apps within Chrome OS. It is a 2-in-1 device that also is compatible with an MSI stylus for drawing and handwriting. However, it does not come with one.

    Lenovo debuted the Duet at CES in January. As of this writing, Lenovo wasn’t openly selling the Duet. However, it went from not listing the Duet at all to displaying it on its website as a “Coming Soon” attraction. Best Buy offered a limited quantity of Duets for preorder in May. When mine arrived, I made it my temporary main computing platform so I could check out how well it could help me get stuff done.

    So far, using it steadily has been mostly successful. However, a few glitches have forced me to set the Duet aside and turn instead to my Linux desktop or laptops to complete specialized production tasks.

    Those issues aside, the Duet poses serious competition to the likes of higher-end rivals such as the Samsung Chromebook 3 and the HP Chromebook x360. The Duet has a few innovations that rekindled my interest in using an actual Chrome OS-powered tablet as a viable alternative computing platform.

Lenovo to Certify Its Full Workstation Portfolio for Ubuntu LTS

  • Lenovo to Certify Its Full Workstation Portfolio for Ubuntu LTS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    Lenovo announced that they will certify their entire portfolio of ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series workstations for Ubuntu and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

    In April, Lenovo surprised the Linux community by partnering with the Fedora Project to offer the Fedora Linux distribution on some of its laptops, including the ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 Gen8.

    Now, the well known hardware manufacturer took another step in getting its hardware ready for Linux users by announcing that it will bring Linux certification to its full workstation portfolio for top GNU/Linux distributions from Canonical and Red Hat.

    According to the company, every model and configuration of its ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series workstations will be certified for Ubuntu LTS versions, such as Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa), as well as the Red Hat Enterprise Linux family of distributions.

Lenovo’s Massive Ubuntu And Red Hat Announcement Levels Up Linux

  • Lenovo’s Massive Ubuntu And Red Hat Announcement Levels Up Linux In 2020

    Right out of the gate I’ll confess: it’s impossible for me to contain my excitement about this unparalleled announcement from Lenovo. The popular OEM is going beyond its pilot program with Fedora 32 and offering full certification and support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Ubuntu LTS across its entire lineup of workstation PCs.

Now You Can Buy Linux Certified Lenovo ThinkPad and ThinkStation

  • Now You Can Buy Linux Certified Lenovo ThinkPad and ThinkStation (for the Best Possible Out of The Box Linux Experience)

    There was a time when ThinkPad was the preferred system for Linux users.

    But that was when ThinkPad was an IBM product. When Beijing-based Lenovo acquired New York-based IBM’s personal computer business in 2005, (I feel that) things started to change.

    ThinkPad was/is an amazing series of laptops, reliable, trustworthy and rock solid. Just ask a person who used it before 2010s.

    But around 2010, Lenovo ThinkPad started to lose its charm. It was filled with issues after issues and consumer complaints of poor performance.

All Lenovo ThinkPad & ThinkStations Are Now Linux Certified

  • All Lenovo ThinkPad & ThinkStations Are Now Linux Certified

    Lenovo is announcing Linux Certification to their ThinkPad and ThinkStation Workstation Portfolio. In the past, Lenovo has only certified specific workstations with specific configurations for use with Linux in an enterprise environment. With this announcement, Lenovo is certifying all of their ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series workstations for use with Ubuntu LTS and Red Hat Enterprise. This will allow users who use Linux an out-of-the box solution without needing to worry about compatibility or stability issues.

  • Desktop Linux: Open source makes a big stride as Lenovo certifies its workstations for two Linux distros

    Lenovo is looking to make Linux a more visible part of its product line-up after announcing full certification for its entire ThinkStation and ThinkPad P workstation series. Starting this month, Linux fans will be able purchase Lenovo workstations pre-installed with their choice of Red Hat or Ubuntu operating system, fully configured to their liking.

    Historically, Lenovo has only certified a select range of Linux distributions for a limited set of devices. But with the once-niche operating system now seeing an increase in demand, the device manufacturer is looking to expand its product portfolio to cater for those who prefer open-source software over the more locked-down platforms offered by Microsoft and Apple.

Lenovo goes all in for Linux, certifying Red Hat and Ubuntu

  • Lenovo goes all in for Linux, certifying Red Hat and Ubuntu for all its workstations

    Lenovo, the worl’s top PC seller, is giving Linux a big boost by certifying all its workstation computers for Red Hat and Ubuntu, two of the most popular open source software solutions.

    “We’re not talking about just hardware certification, either. Lenovo will offer both RHEL and Ubuntu LTS distributions pre-installed,” Forbes notes.

    “Once thought of as a niche IT crowd, this user base of data scientists, developers, application engineers, scientists and more is growing – stepping into sought-after roles across multiple industries and becoming essential within their companies,” wrote Rob Herman, General Manager, Executive Director Workstation & Client AI Group at Lenovo.

Earlier this year in January, Dell unveiled the 2020 refresh...

  • Lenovo’s P-series ThinkPads and ThinkStation PCs are getting Linux options

    Earlier this year in January, Dell unveiled the 2020 refresh for its XPS series of laptops. As part of the lineup, Dell released the XPS 13 2020 with 10th Gen Intel Ice Lake chips. Along with the regular Windows-based variants of the notebook, Dell also released a Ubuntu-based Developer Edition of the XPS 13 2020 featuring Ubuntu 18.04LTS. Up until now, Dell was one of the only major PC OEMs to officially offer Linux distribution options for its notebooks. However, Lenovo will soon be joining Dell by offering Linux-based versions of its P-series ThinkPad notebooks and ThinkStation PCs.

    [...]

    In the Red Hat ecosystem, Lenovo has also partnered with the Fedora project to offer a pilot program with a preloaded Fedora image on the ThinkPad P53 and P1 Gen 2 systems. By certifying its entire workstation portfolio, Lenovo aims to prioritize the needs of specialized end-users and provide the best possible out-of-the-box Linux experience. The certified portfolio of workstations will also be fully customizable and configured-to-order, based on the needs of the end-user. Additionally, Lenovo will be providing complete web support, dedicated Linux forums, configuration guidance, and more to prospective buyers. The new Linux-based workstation lineup will roll out over the summer, starting with the ThinkPad P-series notebooks this month.

  • Lenovo Brings Linux® Certification to ThinkPad and ThinkStation Workstation Portfolio, Easing Deployment for Developers & Data Scientists

    While many users prefer to customize their own machines – either on hardware without an OS or by wiping an existing client OS, then configuring and installing Linux – this can raise uncertainty with system stability, restricted performance, compatibility, end-user productivity and even IT support for devices. Now that these users are making their way out of the proverbial shadows and onto the enterprise floor, the demand is high for an out-of-the-box solution that removes the barrier for deployment of enterprise-grade hardware within a Linux software ecosystem.

Lenovo believes in the Linux desktop

  • Lenovo believes in the Linux desktop

    In the 2000s, if you wanted Linux on a laptop, your best choice without a doubt was an IBM. Later, Lenovo ThinkPad. Then, in 2008, Lenovo decided to no longer officially support Linux on the desktop. There's been a lot of technological changes since, including that Lenovo went back to fully supporting the Linux desktop. There were some hitches, too. Lenovo blew it with Linux on its 2016 Signature Edition PCs. But now Lenovo wants to be desktop Linux's best friend again.

    Lenovo is moving to certify the full workstation portfolio for top Linux distributions from Ubuntu and Red Hat -- "every model, every configuration." While that's not every Lenovo PC -- the Ideapad family isn't included -- that's still an impressive move.

    Lenovo isn't just certifying its high-end laptops and desktops for Linux; the company will also preload its entire portfolio of ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series workstations with both Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and Ubuntu Long Term Support (LTS).

Lenovo will pre-install Ubuntu and Red Hat systems on More

  • Lenovo will pre-install Ubuntu and Red Hat systems on More ThinkPads, ThinkStations

    Lenovo is already well represented within the Linux hardware community having ‘certified’ a swathe of its devices for various different distros over the years.

    And the company recently revealed plans to sell laptops preloaded with Fedora and make more firmware updates available through the vendor-neutral Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS).

    But now it’s going even further with the Linux love.

    Lenovo say ALL of its ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series laptops will be available to buy with Ubuntu LTS pre-loaded and not just a few specific configurations stashed away on a hard-to-find store page somewhere.

Lenovo Adds Linux Certification to Full ThinkPad P Series

  • Lenovo Adds Linux Certification to Full ThinkPad P Series and ThinkStation Lineups

    It was almost exactly one year ago that we posted news of Lenovo’s 2019 ThinkPad P Series lineup, all of which featured Ubuntu as a configuration option. This week Lenovo is “…moving to certify the full workstation portfolio for top Linux distributions from Ubuntu and Red Hat – every model, every configuration”.

    As mentioned above, this Linux certification encompasses Lenovo’s entire P Series lineup, as well as all ThinkStation workstations.

Now You Can Buy Linux Certified Lenovo ThinkPad and ThinkStation

  • Now You Can Buy Linux Certified Lenovo ThinkPad and ThinkStation (For the Best Possible Out of the Box Linux Experience)

    There was a time when ThinkPad was the preferred system for Linux users.

    But that was when ThinkPad was an IBM product. When Beijing-based Lenovo acquired New York-based IBM’s personal computer business in 2005, (I feel that) things started to change.

    ThinkPad was/is an amazing series of laptops, reliable, trustworthy and rock solid. Just ask a person who used it before 2010s.

    But around 2010, Lenovo ThinkPad started to lose its charm. It was filled with issues after issues and consumer complaints of poor performance.

    Things were even worse for Linux users. Its secure boot with UEFI created problems for Linux users. The controversy with Linux would just not end.

Lenovo is now offering full certification and Linux preinstalled

  • Lenovo is now offering full certification and Linux preinstalled hardware

    PC giant Lenovo is bringing serious support to Linux...big support. The entire line of Lenovo workstations (minus the IdeaPad) will now be fully certified to work with Linux. That’s not all. Lenovo will also start selling the entire line of ThinkStation PCs and ThinkPad P series laptops with either Ubuntu LTS or Red Hat Enterprise Linux pre-installed.

    Lenovo will also include full web support and dedicated Linux forums into the mix.

    For many, within the Linux community, this could be the biggest piece of news to develop for the open source operating system. Lenovo adding their support behind Linux not only gives consumers far more options for Linux hardware, it could easily help companies to realize the open source operating system is a viable option for the desktop. And with Lenovo also adding their drivers into the upstream kernel, all of their hardware will work with Linux, out of the box. No more tweaking or compiling to get features like Wi-Fi, sound, and fingerprint readers to work.

What Lenovo's recent announcement means for Linux

  • What Lenovo's recent announcement means for Linux and the open source community

    2020 has done everything it can to rob of us joy and progress. It seems there's some new bit of news that deflates all hope and sucks the wind out of our sails. But then, we get the slightest glimmer of good news and, no matter how insignificant it may seem in the grand scheme of things, we hold onto like it like it was a pot of gold at the end of every rainbow in the sky.

    Such is the case when Lenovo made the announcement that they were broadening their support for desktop Linux.

Lenovo is adding Linux to all its workstation products

  • Lenovo is adding Linux to all its workstation products

    Following the news that it will soon offer Linux laptops, Lenovo has now announced that it will also be bringing Ubuntu and Red Hat Linux to its full workstation portfolio.

    Many Linux users prefer to customize their own machines by configuring and installing Linux distros themselves but this can raise uncertainty when it comes to system stability, restricted performance compatibility, end-user productivity and even IT support for devices.

    Now though, demand has increased for an out-of-the-box solution that removes the barrier for deployment of enterprise-grade hardware within a Linux software ecosystem which is why Lenovo has decided to bring Linux to its workstations.

Lenovo Will Pre-load Ubuntu and Red Hat on All Its Workstations

  • Lenovo Will Pre-load Ubuntu and Red Hat on All Its Workstations

    TechRepublic notes the news "comes on the heels of a number of new Linux desktop support news. This year we've seen the rise of Purism, Tuxedo Computers, Pine64, Juno Computers, Vikings, Dell's continued support with the XPS Dev edition laptop and the Precision line, and now Lenovo."

    They also argue for continued support for the smaller vendors of Linux hardware. "Companies like System76 are a big reason why desktop Linux continued climbing up that steep mountain called 'Acceptance.'" But their article concludes that "No matter which path you take, you now (as a Linux user) have more options."

Lenovo ThinkPad and ThinkStation now have Linux certification

  • Lenovo ThinkPad and ThinkStation now have Linux certification

    Most computer users are familiar with macOS and Windows 10, both of which have certification standards. But, despite it being widely used, not everyone is familiar with Linux or Linux certification. Linux may not be something most of use at home but it is heavily relied upon by businesses, institutions, and government. As a matter of fact, much of the internet is being controlled through Linux servers.

    So Linux certification is important for those whose job is to work and maintain the systems that are running this open-source OS. Lenovo has announced that Linux certification is now on its ThinkPad and ThinkStation offerings.

Lenova Expands Linux Certification to Its Entire Lineup

  • Lenova Expands Linux Certification to Its Entire Lineup

    In good news for Linux, Lenovo has expanded its Linux certification to its entire ThinkPad and ThinkStation lineup.

    Toward the end of April, Lenovo announced it would be offering Fedora Workstation on its ThinkPad laptops. Previously, Dell had been the main manufacturer offering an OEM Linux option.

    It seems Lenovo is now going all-in on Linux, with both the ThinkPad and ThinkStation lineup being certified for both Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Ubuntu LTS

    “Now, I’m excited to share Lenovo is moving to certify the full workstation portfolio for top Linux distributions from Ubuntu® and Red Hat® – every model, every configuration,” writes Rob Herman, General Manager, Executive Director Workstation & Client AI Group.

Lenovo brings Linux certification to ThinkPad...

  • Lenovo brings Linux certification to ThinkPad and ThinkStation Workstation portfolio

    Lenovo is moving to certify the full workstation portfolio for top Linux distributions from Ubuntu and Red Hat – every model, every configuration.

    While many users prefer to customise their own machines – either on hardware without an OS or by wiping an existing client OS, then configuring and installing Linux – this can raise uncertainty with system stability, restricted performance, compatibility, end-user productivity and even IT support for devices. Now that these users are making their way out of the proverbial shadows and onto the enterprise floor, the demand is high for an out-of-the-box solution that removes the barrier for the deployment of enterprise-grade hardware within a Linux software ecosystem.

    For the users deploying Linux on a desktop or mobile workstation, Lenovo has historically certified only certain products with a limited subset of hardware configurations. Our entire portfolio of ThinkStation and ThinkPad P Series workstations will now be certified via both Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Ubuntu LTS – a long-term, enterprise-stability variant of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution. This total certification will assure users their workstation investment is tried, tested and officially verified.

Lenovo improves ThinkPads running Linux but issues with problem

  • Lenovo improves ThinkPads running Linux but issues with problem machines remain

    Last month, when Lenovo announced it was going to certify its ThinkPad lineup for use with Linux operating systems, my mind turned to one device, the ThinkPad X1 Extreme Gen 2.

    At the end of last year, I chronicled my issues with the device, and while it was fair criticism at the time that my use of Fedora might not have been the best, with news that Lenovo was going to offer to preload Ubuntu, Red Hat, and Fedora distributions, that choice was more relevant than I could have imagined at the time.

    Since its announcement, a surprising number of firmware updates have appeared for the X1 Extreme.

    It went unmentioned last year, but the Synaptics fingerprint reader on the laptop was completely useless until around two weeks ago. That brand of reader had long been a pain point when combined with Linux, so it is nice to see some support finally land.

    As usual with new Linux compatibility, there are a couple of caveats. You can log in with your fingerprint, but GNOME 3 will not unlock its keyring until you type in a password, so it is best to type in a password when you log in, and use the fingerprint to unlock the lock screen thereafter. On the other end, once a fingerprint is registered, sudo will demand a fingerprint instead of a password. It's really hard to have your cake and eat it too when it comes to desktop Linux.

    But the biggest pain point with the X1 Extreme by far was the hybrid graphics setup, which at the time appeared to be a choice between using only the Nvidia GPU or the Intel integrated graphics.

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