Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Foundation Leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New Cloud Engineer Bootcamp from The Linux Foundation Fully Prepares Individuals for a Cloud Career

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the availability of its first ever bootcamp program, designed to take individuals from newbie to certified cloud engineer in six months.

    The Linux Foundation Cloud Engineer Bootcamp bundles self-paced eLearning courses with certification exams and dedicated instructor support for a comprehensive and well-rounded educational program. The training begins with Linux at the operating system layer, and moves up the stack, covering DevOps, cloud, containers and more, providing all the knowledge needed to work as a cloud engineer. The specific courses and exams included, all of which are taken online, are...

  • The Linux Foundation introduces Cloud Engineer Bootcamp for cloud job seekers

    Back when I was going to tech shows every few weeks, no matter what the show was about -- Linux, networking, open-source software development -- I could always count on one thing: Every, and I mean every, company was looking for cloud-savvy people to hire. Indeed.com found that between October 2015 and October 2019, cloud computing jobs increased by 55%. By 2022, Gartner predicts the public cloud services market alone will be three times bigger than overall IT services. But there isn't anything like enough cloud experts to meet the demand. That's where the Linux Foundation's new Cloud Engineer Bootcamp comes in.

  • Linux Foundation Launches Cloud Engineer Bootcamp

    The Linux Foundation has announced its first ever bootcamp program, designed to take individuals from newbie to certified cloud engineer in six months. The training begins with Linux at the operating system layer, and moves up the stack, covering DevOps, cloud, containers and more, providing all the knowledge needed to work as a cloud engineer.

    The Linux Foundation Cloud Engineer Bootcamp bundles self-paced eLearning courses with certification exams and dedicated instructor support for a well-rounded educational program.

    “A price point significantly below most bootcamps, coupled with industry-leading certifications and vendor-neutral training, makes this offering a tremendous value and provides an accessible option for individuals looking to break into the IT and cloud industries. At the same time, it will help close the talent gap and ensure adequate staffing for companies seeking cloud talent,” quipped Clyde Seepersad, SVP and general manager of training & certification at The Linux Foundation.

  • Priyanka Sharma Takes Over The Helm Of CNCF

Linux Foundation Offers 6-Month Cloud Engineer Certification...

  • Linux Foundation Offers 6-Month Cloud Engineer Certification Bootcamp
  • Linux Foundation Launches Cloud Engineer Bootcamp to Make You Job Ready for Cloud Industry

    Linux Foundation, the official organization behind Linux project, has launched a 6 months online training program to prepare more cloud engineers as the demand for cloud-skilled people grows in the IT industry.

    These days, when the IT infrastructure revolves around cloud computing, traditional Linux sysadmin knowledge is not sufficient anymore.

    Sysadmins need to know the newer technologies related to Linux containers, the backbone of cloud servers.

    No one understands the technology trend in this field better than Linux Foundation. They work closely with industry giants like IBM, Microsoft, Google, Cisco to lead, to guide and to set industry standards.

  • How CHAOSS Measures Open Source Community Health

    Here, we’ll look at the CHAOSS project, which takes a different approach in its advocacy and helps quantify the health of projects with specific tools and metrics. CHAOSS (which stands for Community Health Analytics Open Source Software) is a Linux Foundation project “focused on creating analytics and metrics to help define community health.” Since it was founded in 2017, the CHAOSS project has grown significantly and now includes various working groups, 40 defined metrics, a new metric platform called Augur, the CHAOSScon international conferences, and a brand-new podcast.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Mobian Project Wants to Bring Debian GNU/Linux to Mobile Devices

If you thought for a second that the Linux phone market lacks operating systems you can try, think again as developers are just getting started. After postmarketOS announcing their PinePhone Community Edition, now there’s a new project called Mobian, which promises to bring Debian to Linux phones. That’s right, you can now install and use a pure Debian GNU/Linux operating system on your PinePhone. Mobian helps you do that by integrating the standard Debian GNU/Linux packages with the GNOME-based Phosh (Phone Shell) user interface developed by Purism for their Librem 5 phone. Read more

Expand your Raspberry Pi with Arduino ports

As members of the maker community, we are always looking for creative ways to use hardware and software. This time, Patrick Lima and I decided we wanted to expand the Raspberry Pi's ports using an Arduino board, so we could access more functionality and ports and add a layer of protection to the device. There are a lot of ways to use this setup, such as building a solar panel that follows the sun, a home weather station, joystick interaction, and more. [...] The first step is to expand the Raspberry Pi's ports to also use Arduino ports. This is possible using Linux ARM's native serial communication implementation that enables you to use an Arduino's digital, analogical, and Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) ports to run an application on the Raspberry Pi. This project uses TotalCross, an open source software development kit for building UIs for embedded devices, to execute external applications through the terminal and use the native serial communication. There are two classes you can use to achieve this: Runtime.exec and PortConnector. They represent different ways to execute these actions, so we will show how to use both in this tutorial, and you can decide which way is best for you. Read more

20 Best Free Stacking Window Managers

A window manager is software that manages the windows that applications bring up. For example, when you start an application, there will be a window manager running in the background, responsible for the placement and appearance of windows. It is important not to confuse a window manager with a desktop environment. A desktop environment typically consists of icons, windows, toolbars, folders, wallpapers, and desktop widgets. They provide a collection of libraries and applications made to operate cohesively together. A desktop environment contains its own window manager. There are a few different types of window managers. This article focuses on stacking window managers which are also known as floating window managers. This is a type of window manager that draws all windows in a specific order, allowing them to overlap, using a technique called painter’s algorithm. All window managers that allow the overlapping of windows but are not compositing window managers are considered stacking window managers, although they can use different methods. Stacking window managers allow windows to overlap by drawing them one at a time. Stacking, or repainting (in reference to painter’s algorithm) refers to the rendering of each window as an image, painted directly over the desktop, and over any other windows that might already have been drawn, effectively erasing the areas that are covered. The process usually starts with the desktop, and proceeds by drawing each window and any child windows from back to front, until finally the foreground window is drawn. Here’s our recommended free stacking window managers. All of them are free and open source software. Read more

Today in Techrights