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today's leftovers

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  • 2020-06-05 | Linux Headlines

    The first-ever Blender LTS is out with support for VR, the CNCF debuts a training program to convey students from novice to cloud professional in six months, the Matrix project previews peer-to-peer messaging, and Canonical introduces two developer tools.

  • 5 Reasons Not to Use Kubernetes Distributions
  • Fedora program update: 2020-23

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Elections voting is open through 11 June.

  • Adding EteSync address books to Kontact - GSoC 2020 with KDE and EteSync [Part 3]

    Last week, I wrote a post about adding EteSync address books to Kontact. I’m happy to report that you can now fetch your EteSync address books and contacts in Kontact. If you want to test it out, skip to ”Testing the resource” section below. You can read on for updates on the project:

  • Reordering the People Sidebar in DigiKam

    The People Sidebar is an important aspect of Face Management in DigiKam. It displays the names of all people in the database, and provides a variety of context menu functionality. Currently, the Face Tags (Names) in the Sidebar are sorted alphabetically (either ascending or descending). This causes inconvenience to the user, particularly when confirming the results of a Facial Recognition.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the weeks 2020/21 – 23

    It has been a while since I wrote a ‘weekly’ review. My own fault for taking some days off, right? At least I had good weather and enjoyed the time – a lot even. But now I am in dept to you: I owe you a review over what happened over the last three weeks. Since the last review, openSUSE Tumbleweed has seen 11 new snapshots (0514, 0515, 0516, 0517, 0519, 0520, 0523, 0526, 0528, 0602 and 0603). Thanks to Max for taking care of it during my absence).

    [...]

    This means almost all of the things from the last ‘weekly review’s’ ‘things in progress’ have been delivered by now. But that does not mean there is nothing left.

  • VAX port needs help

    This are severe challenges for a general purpose operating system like NetBSD, but also provides reality checks for our claim to be a very portable operating system.

    Unfortunately there is another challenge, totally outside of NetBSD, but affecting the VAX port big time: the compiler support for VAX is ... let's say sub-optimal. It is also risking to be dropped completely by gcc upstream.

    Now here is where people can help: there is a bounty campaign to finance a gcc hacker to fix the hardest and most immediate issue with gcc for VAX. Without this being resolved, gcc will drop support for VAX in a near future version.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: corels 0.0.2 on CRAN: Initial upload!

    The source code repo has since been relocated from my account to the (upstream) corels org in GitHub. And renamed: as the upstream (C++) repo as well as the existing Python package simply call is corels we now do too. The repo, to be distinguishable as a directory, will remain named rcppcorels.

    We also describe the package a little on the corels package page. Some more work should go into along with work in the upstream repos, so please follow whichever GitHub repo you are interested in.

  • Mozilla releases recommendations on EU Data Strategy

    Mozilla recently submitted our response to the European Commission’s public consultation on its European Strategy for Data. The Commission’s data strategy is one of the pillars of its tech strategy, which was published in early 2020 (more on that here). To European policymakers, promoting proper use and management of data can play a key role in a modern industrial policy, particularly as it can provide a general basis for insights and innovations that advance the public interest.

    Our recommendations provide insights on how to manage data in a way that protects the rights of individuals, maintains trust, and allows for innovation. In addition to highlighting some of Mozilla’s practices and policies which underscore our commitment to ethical data and working in the open – such as our Lean Data Practices Toolkit, the Data Stewardship Program, and the Firefox Public Data Report – our key recommendations for the European Commission are the following...

  • Sean Whitton: spacecadetrebindings

    I’ve been less good at taking adequate typing breaks during the lockdown and I’ve become concerned about how much chording my left hand does on its own during typical Emacs usage, with caps lock rebound to control, as I’ve had it for years.

  • Why Now Is the Time for “Open Innovation”

    Collaboration can obviously save human lives, but it can also produce huge benefits for companies — even though it’s often overlooked in normal circumstances. For more than a decade, we’ve studied open innovation and have taught thousands of executives and students how to innovate in a more distributed, decentralized and participatory way. The classroom response is usually, “My company needs more of this!” But despite the enthusiasm, companies rarely follow through. We have also witnessed how companies have used hackathons and other forms of open innovation to generate heaps of creative ideas that never reach the point of implementation, leading to frustration among employees and partners. At many companies this kind of distributed, decentralized, and participatory way of innovating remains an ambition that hasn’t yet come true.

    [...]

    Earlier research has found that many companies are extremely worried about value “leaking” from collaborations with outsiders. As a result, they often stick to their knitting and collaborate on a few peripheral tasks, but not on the most important business issues. For example, we are aware of several chemical companies in Europe and the U.S. that made it practically impossible for their open innovation partners to provide help and advice. How? They wouldn’t reveal what their most critical problems entailed, as that could endanger future patenting. Instead the innovation partnerships slipped into irrelevance.

    These intellectual property concerns are of course real and important, but they risk blocking any open innovation initiative from gaining momentum. However, during the Covid-19 crisis it could be wise to focus more on creating value than capturing value.

  • Free Software Can Cost Plenty [Ed: NSA perpetuates this idea that somehow it's Free software that's the risk, not proprietary software with NSA back doors]

    Cybersecurity experts note that the notion of sharing software is hardly new; most would argue the present open source movement began in 1984. The Free Software Foundation and GNU project led to the GNU C compiler and GNU Emacs, both pivotal to software development at the time. In addition, the GNU General Public License (GPL) allows the copying, modification and redistribution of software licensed under the GPL. None of those actions require explicit permission of the original owner; the only obligation is that modifications be public and therefore visible to the originator.

    Although OSS has facilitated many software solutions, they bring with them inherent cybersecurity issues, the experts say. The strength of the OSS community—its openness and trust—unfortunately also is a weakness. A cultural system organized to solicit and accept patches, fixes and improvements from a variety of somewhat vetted but fundamentally untrusted sources will inevitably allow some malicious code to be introduced.

  • Linus Torvalds criticized the L1 cache reset function when context switching – Linus all programming languages suck except C

    “The function resets the cache not only when necessary, but also on the “order” of any application.

    Linus Torvalds, the Creator of the Linux kernel, opposed the addition of the L1 data cache reset function when context switching to the Linux kernel version 5.8. This feature was proposed as a protection against vulnerabilities of the Spectre class and other cache leaks.

    The problem is that the function resets the cache not only when necessary, but also at the “order” of any application. In multitasking OSS such as Linux distributions, this will reduce the performance of not only the application itself, but also the rest of the processes. Of course, this state of Affairs is not suitable for highly loaded server systems. According to Torvals, resetting the L1 cache makes sense only for Intel processors, and where it is not required, the function will be superfluous.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rustup 1.22.0, Servo and Performance Improvements via Formally-Verified Cryptography in Firefox

    • Announcing Rustup 1.22.0

      The rustup working group is happy to announce the release of rustup version 1.22.0. Rustup is the recommended tool to install Rust, a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

    • This Week In Servo 131

      Welcome back everyone - it’s been a year without written updates, but we’re getting this train back on track! Servo hasn’t been dormant in that time; the biggest news was the public release of Firefox Reality (built on Servo technology) in the Microsoft store. In the past week, we merged 44 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

    • Performance Improvements via Formally-Verified Cryptography in Firefox

      Cryptographic primitives, while extremely complex and difficult to implement, audit, and validate, are critical for security on the web. To ensure that NSS (Network Security Services, the cryptography library behind Firefox) abides by Mozilla’s principle of user security being fundamental, we’ve been working with Project Everest and the HACL* team to bring formally-verified cryptography into Firefox. In Firefox 57, we introduced formally-verified Curve25519, which is a mechanism used for key establishment in TLS and other protocols. In Firefox 60, we added ChaCha20 and Poly1305, providing high-assurance authenticated encryption. Firefox 69, 77, and 79 improve and expand these implementations, providing increased performance while retaining the assurance granted by formal verification.

today's howtos

Stable Clonezilla live 2.6.7-28 Released

This release of Clonezilla live (2.6.7-28) includes major enhancements and bug fixes.
ENHANCEMENTS and CHANGES from 2.6.6-15

  • The underlying GNU/Linux operating system was upgraded. This release is based on the Debian Sid repository (as of 2020/Jun/30).
  • Linux kernel was updated to 5.7.6-1.
  • ocs-iso, ocs-live-dev: sync syslinux-related files when copying syslinux exec files.
  • When creating recovery iso/zip file, if it's in Clonezilla live environment, we have those syslinux files. Use that first so the version mismatch can be avoided. Ref: https://sourceforge.net/p/clonezilla/support-requests/127/
  • Move grub-header.cfg from bootx64.efi to grub.cfg so that it's more flexible.
  • To avoid conflict with the patch of grub in CentOS/Fedora, for GRUB EFI NB MAC/IP config style, the netboot file is now like grub.cfg-drbl-00:50:56:01:01:01 and grub.cfg-drbl-192.168.177.2 not grub.cfg-01-* anymore.
  • Add xen-tools
  • Partclone was updated to 0.3.14. The codes about xfs was updated to be 4.20.0.
  • Package exfat-fuse was removed since the kernel has module for that.
  • A better mechanism to deal with linuxefi/initrdefi or linux/initrd in the grub config was added.
  • Read more

Pico-ITX board based on i.MX8M ships with Linux BSP

F&S has launched a $407 and up “armStone MX8M” Pico-ITX SBC that runs Linux on an i.MX8M with up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC with GbE, WiFi/BT, 5x USB, MIPI-CSI, DVI, and a mini-PCIe slot. F&S Elektronik Systeme originally announced the NXP i.MX8M-based armStone MX8M Pico-ITX board in early 2018 with an intention to begin sampling in Q2 of that year. The i.MX8M-based SBC has finally arrived, selling for 360 Euros ($407) in a kit that includes cables, a Yocto/Buildroot BSP, and full access to documentation. The key new addition since the 2018 announcement is a mini-PCIe slot and SIM card slot. Instead of supplying 4x USB 2.0 host ports, you get 2x USB 3.0 and 2x USB 2.0, and the micro-USB OTG port has been updated from 2.0 to 3.0. Read more