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PCLinuxOS Magazine March 2007 Issue 7 Released!

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PCLOS

We are simultaneously publishing the HTML Version of the Magazine as well for our low bandwidth users.  The HTML Site is W3C standards compliant for easy browsing.Some highlights include:

  1. Application Changes from PCLinuxOS .93 to 2007
  2. Playing with Beryl
  3. Recording Audio with PCLinuxOS
  4. PCLinuxOS DualView and TwinView Tutorial
  5. How to Multi-Boot Linux
  6. Working in Gnome in PCLinuxOS
  7. As always, plenty more is packed inside 

Please note that the magazine is released under the Creative Commons Atribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 license unless otherwise stated on the articles themselves. By downloading this magazine you acknowledge and accept this license agreement.Thanks for your interest in PCLinuxOS!  If you feel you'd like to contribute to future issues, please check out the contribute link in the main menu.  You can also drop us a line via the contact link in the main menu.  If you have any suggestions, comments, corrections, or letters to the editor feel free to submit them this way or send an email to  mag@mypclinuxos.com.This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it   (This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it)   Thanks and enjoy! Download March 2007 Issue 7  Mirror Download March 2007 Issue 7 HTML Version March 2007 Issue 7 

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