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Qualcomm’s Linux-driven robotics kit taps Snapdragon 865

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Linux
Sci/Tech

The 96Boards-compatible “Qualcomm Robotics RB5 Platform” runs Linux and ROS 2 on a Qualcomm QRB5165 based on the 15-TOPS Snapdragon 865 with optional 5G and cameras including RealSense and ToF.

Qualcomm and Thundercomm have followed up on last year’s Qualcomm Robotics RB3 Platform with a similarly 96Boards form-factor Qualcomm Robotics RB5 Platform that supports 5G communications and input from up to 7x concurrent cameras. The Linux and ROS 2 driven development kit advances from a Snapdragon 845 to new custom robotics SoC called the Qualcomm QRB5165 based on the Snapdragon 865. (In other news, Qualcomm announced a 5G-ready Snapdragon 690 SoC for mid-range phones.)

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Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 processor

  • Qualcomm launches 5G, AI-enabled robotics platform

    Qualcomm Technologies released the Qualcomm Robotics RB5 platform. The RB5, comprised of hardware, software and development tools, is designed for the consumer, enterprise, defense, industrial and professional service sectors.

    According to the company, the platform’s Qualcomm QRB5165 processor offers a heterogeneous computing architecture, coupled with the fifth-generation Qualcomm AI Engine that delivers 15 tera operations per second of artificial intelligence (AI) performance for running complex AI and deep learning workloads. The processor also offers incredible machine learning inferencing at the edge under restricted power budgets using the new Qualcomm Hexagon Tensor Accelerator.

  • Qualcomm Robotics RB5 Platform Targets the Development of 5G and AI-Enabled Robots

    Qualcomm Robotics RB3 Development Platform powered by Snapdragon 845 processor gets an upgrade with Robotics RB5 Platform equipped with Qualcomm QRB5165 Robotics processor designed for industrial-grade temperature operating, and featuring a 15 TOPS Qualcomm AI Engine fo artificial intelligence and machine learning applications such as heterogeneous computing, enhanced computer vision, and multi-camera concurrency.

    The development platform also supports for 4G and 5G connectivity via a companion module and runs Ubuntu and ROS 2.0 operating systems.

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