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Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” Now Officially Out

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  • Monthly News – June 2020

    We’re almost ready to release Linux Mint 20. Following this release, before we move on to the next development cycle, we’ll take two weeks to work on the upgrade path from Linux Mint 19.3 and the port of the new features in LMDE 4.

    I’d like to thank everyone who took part in the BETA. Thanks to your participation, we received a lot of feedback and we were able to fix very important bugs. 167 reports were processed. Among other important changes, Cinnamon fractional scaling was made more intuitive, many translations issues were solved, LVM encrypted installs no longer require an Internet connection, panel layout selection was brought back in the Welcome Screen, support for StatusNotifier icons (Qt and Electron apps) was improved. Many components received bug fixes and as always the BETA phase allowed us to identify new issues and get a better release.

    We also had to make a few tough decisions. The new Mint-Y colors were postponed until Linux Mint 20.1. The change which made the Grub menu always visible was reverted, and the Grub theme, which in this release prevented Linux Mint 20 to boot on particular laptops was removed.

    As we made these changes, we felt the need to document them, so we took the opportunity to start gathering info into a new guide called The Linux Mint User Guide. At the moment it’s just a collection of pages which cover new topics such as how to configure and theme Grub, how to install Chromium, why Snap is disabled and how to enable it. As we go along we’ll add more and more information in this guide and we’re hoping it will grow into something very helpful for the community.

  • Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” Xfce released!

    The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” Xfce Edition.

  • Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” MATE released!

    The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” MATE Edition.

  • Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” Cinnamon released!

    The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” Cinnamon Edition.

  • Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" Released - Based On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" is shipping this weekend as the newest major release to this user-friendly desktop Linux distribution derived from the Ubuntu LTS package set.

    The big change with Linux Mint 20 is now being based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS packages rather than 18.04, thus better hardware support and a whole host of new packag

  • Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” Released. This is What’s New

    Linux Mint team announced that the latest version of its operating system Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana”, and it is available for download and upgrades.

    Coming after a couple of days since the BETA release, Linux Mint 20 brings some core and major changes. Here’s a summary for you.

Ubuntu-based Linux Mint 20 'Ulyana' is here

  • Ubuntu-based Linux Mint 20 'Ulyana' is here

    Earlier this month, we told you about Linux Mint 20 BETA . Code-named "Ulyana," it was a very controversial release, as the developers decided to cancel the 32-bit version. Unfortunately, the devs also shocked the world by revealing their intention to remove Snapd starting with version 20 of the operating system. Don't forget, all of this follows the unpopular decision by the developers to pull both GIMP and VLC from Mint too.

    And now, Linux Mint 20 sheds its pre-release tag and becomes available for download. The newest version of the operating system comes with Linux kernel 5.4 and is based on Ubuntu 20.04. Linux Mint 20 is officially supported until the year 2025! Best of all, you can choose among three desktop environments -- Cinnamon (4.6), MATE (1.24), and Xfce (4.14). It even comes with a new program called "Warpinator."

Linux Mint 20 'Ulyana' is out with better NVIDIA Optimus support

  • Linux Mint 20 'Ulyana' is out with better NVIDIA Optimus support, fractional scaling

    Linux Mint 20 has today been officially released across multiple official desktop environments and it's all sounding great. The Cinnamon desktop edition sounding especially good.

    This is the first Linux Mint release to be based upon Ubuntu 20.04, the latest Long-Term Support release so you can keep on using Linux Mint 20 happily until around 2025. If you're looking for a good starting point with Linux, Mint is often a good choice.

Linux Mint 20 is Officially Available Now!

Linux Mint 20 Final has been released

  • Linux Mint 20 Final has been released

    The team behind the popular Linux distribution Linux Mint has released Linux Mint 20, codename Ulyana, to the public on June 27, 2020. The new version of the distribution comes in Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce editions that users can install on their devices.

    Updates to the new version will become available soon so that existing installations can be upgraded. Users may also download the latest version from the official project website or one of the official mirror sites to run a Live version or install it on a device.

Linux Mint 20 (Ulyana) Installation Steps with Screenshots

  • Linux Mint 20 (Ulyana) Installation Steps with Screenshots

    Linux Mint has announced its LTS (Long Term Version) release named “Ulyana“, Linux Mint 20.0. According to the Linux Mint team, this version is going to be based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. As it is a LTS release so we will get latest updates and patches for the next 5 years (till 2025). While Ubuntu comes with a set release date every time, it is not the case with Linux Mint. In this article, we’ll see all the new features in Linux Mint 20 along with a step-by-step installation guide for Linux Mint 20.0 (Ulyana). For this article purpose, we’ll discuss about the new features and installation guide for the Linux Mint 20 Cinnamon release.

    [...]

    That’s it, you’ve successfully completed the installation of Linux Mint 20 Cinnamon on your system. Explore all the new features of Linux Mint 20.0 “Ulyana”.

    If you still have any queries or doubts or if you do face any issues during the installation process, please post your questions in the feedback section below. We’ll try to answer all your queries at the earliest.

Linux Mint 20 Ulyana Cinnamon release now available

  • Linux Mint 20 Ulyana Cinnamon release now available

    The development team responsible for creating the Linux Mint operating system of this week announce the release of Linux Mint 20 Ulyana Cinnamon, bringing with it a wealth of new features, tweaks and enhancements. Linux Mint 20 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2025. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use, say its developers.

    Linux Mint 20 Cinnamon includes version 4.6 of the Cinnamon desktop environment, providing the Nemo file manager and support for fractional display scaling, enmabling users to set custom DPI levels at any value between 100 percent and 200 percent for screens with high pixel density.

Ubuntu 20.04-based Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" now available

  • Ubuntu 20.04-based Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" now available

    With one more year of support left for Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya," a new long-term support release is now available, namely Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana." This new release, based on Ubuntu 20.04 "Focal Fossa," arrived at the end of last week and is the first one to drop 32-bit support, but there are quite a few other changes that need to be highlighted.

    Although there are some minor differences between the MATE, Cinnamon, and Xfce releases, we will mention the changes that apply to all of them. In the end, the differences in terms of bundled software and looks are not that big — the main areas that should have an impact on your choice should be the resource usage and the look and feel of the GUI. Without further ado, these are the main changes that Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" brings to the table...

Linux Mint 20 "Cinnamon" overview | Sleek, modern, innovative.

Linux Mint 20

  • Linux Mint 20

    Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" has been released in Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce editions. Linux Mint 20 is based on Ubuntu 20.04 and will be supported until 2025. Release notes are available for Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce.

A First Look At Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" Cinnamon

  • A First Look At Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" Cinnamon

    Linux Mint 20, codenamed "Ulyana," was recently released so I thought I would take a quick first look at Linux Mint 20 with the Cinnamon desktop environment. Linux Mint 20 has made headlines recently due to their decision to try to block installation of snaps.

Linux Mint 20 First Look: Fresh Cinnamon Looking Good

Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" Full Installation Walkthrough

  • Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" Full Installation Walkthrough

    Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" was released recently, and as usual I've created a walkthrough video on the installation process. This procedure will walk you through wiping your drive and installing Mint as your only OS. The procedure hasn't changed much (if at all) from previous releases, so if you've already seen the process, there's nothing new this time around for the most part.

Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" Cinnamon Edition, Full Review

  • Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" Cinnamon Edition, Full Review

    Linux Mint 20 "Ulyana" was recently released, and in this video we'll explore some of the highlights and even some of the controversial changes as well. The installation process, Warpinator, and the anti-snap changes are explored, and more.

Linux Mint 20: Still the best Linux desktop despite one quirk

  • Linux Mint 20: Still the best Linux desktop despite one quirk

    You'll also need at least 15GBs of disk space, but I recommend 20GBs. Finally, you'll need a graphics card and monitor that supports a 1024×768 resolution. In short, you can pretty much run Mint on any PC you find in a second-hand junk store.

    Under the hood, Mint 20 runs on top of the 5.4 Linux kernel. It's most notable new features are support for AMD Navi 12 and 14 GPUs, AMD Arcturus graphics cards, AMD Dali APU, AMD 2020 APU platforms, and Intel Tiger Lake CPUs.

    One thing you can't do easily yet is upgrade from Mint 19.3 to 20. Clement "Clem" Lefebvre, Mint's lead developer, explained, you can't use the 19.3's update manager because "the process will be completely different since this is a new major version and a new package base." By mid-July, Mint will release an easy upgrade path. For now, you must install Mint 20 from scratch.

    For my tests, rather than use old hardware, I used a 2019 Dell XPS 13. This model, which came with Ubuntu 18.04, was powered by an Intel Core i7-10710U processor. It also came with a 512GB SSD and 16GBs of RAM. This is vastly more powerful hardware than you need for Mint.

    First, I installed Linux Mint 19.3 on it so I could get an idea of how well Mint 20 compares to its immediate ancestor. Then, I installed Linux Mint 20 on it with the Cinnamon 4.6 desktop. I did this by downloading the Mint 20's 2GB ISO image and then burning it to a USB stick. That done, I set the XPS 13's firmware to boot from the USB stick and installed 20, reset it to boot from the SSD and I was on my way. The entire process, from beginning to end took about half-an-hour.

Linux Mint 20 isn't exactly bursting with freshenss

  • Linux Mint 20 isn't exactly bursting with freshness but, hey, there's kernel 5.4 and it's a long-term support release

    The Linux Mint team has released Mint 20 Cinnamon, a long-term support (LTS) release. It is based on Ubuntu 20.04, will be supported until 2025, and new Mint versions will use the same package base until 2022.

    Linux Mint comes in three flavours, all of which are now available in Mint 20 "Ulyana" editions. One uses the minimalist Xfce desktop environment. The second, called MATE, uses a fork of the GNOME 2 desktop, while the third, Cinnamon, uses a fork of the GNOME 3 desktop created and maintained by the Mint team. Cinnamon appears to be the most common choice among Mint users. More details on the origins and difference between MATE and Cinnamon are here.

Linux Mint 20.0 Released

  • Linux Mint 20.0 Released

    Linux Mint 20.0 is now available with its traditional separate releases based on different desktop environments. I have just upgraded my LMDE4 to latest Linux Kernel, so won’t be trying Mint 20.0 anytime soon. What about you?

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