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GSoC Reports From KDE and Python

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  • GSoC 2020 and KDE

    Tomorrow (29/06/2020) begins the first evaluation of the Google Summer of Code 2020. Last GSoC, when I was participating as a student, I wrote in my final report a set of future proposals that could be done in the ROCS graph IDE (Section What’s Next?). This year, some students got interested in these ideas but only one could enter the program (we didn’t have enough mentors for more than one project).

  • Cantor Integrated Documentation : Week 3 and 4 Progress

    Hello KDE people. First phase evaluations is due from today onward until 3rd of July. It has been coupe of weeks since I had posted about my project. I was quite busy writing code implementing the documentation panel for the various backends supported by Cantor. In the last post I have explained about how I generated the help files namely qhc (Qt Help Collection) and qch (Qt Compressed Help) from the documentation's source file. In today's post I will explain how I utilized Maxima's help files to actually display help inside the Cantor application itself. So here are the things done:-

  • KDE Connect SMS App (First Evaluation)

    Hi Everyone! It’s been a while since my last post and during this period I continued adding MMS support in KDE Connect SMS app. After the addition of MMS support in android app, My next step was to enable the desktop SMS client to allow users to reply to multi-target messages. I had some discussion with my mentors related to the structure of the network packets to allow sending multimedia files from android to desktop. Since the Attachment field should be an optional field and replacing the current packet type entirely was not feasible keeping in mind the backward compatibility for the desktop app. Simon suggested a nice idea of converting the thumbnails into Base64 encoded string and then adding it into the network packet. This solved the issue of replacing the entire method of pushing the messages to the desktop.

    After successfully completing and testing the code on android studio, I added the support to receive and display the optional attachment object on the desktop side. The desktop side was mostly straight forward except transferring the QImage from C++ to QML but at the end I figured it out.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In: Week 5
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #5
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: [Week 4] Check-in
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #5
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In #3 (22nd Jun - 29th Jun)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 3 Check-in

    Since we can parse a shell script into statements now. We need to fiter the install command and extact what will be installed in the command.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: Free Software, Slackel, Ubuntu, Fedora, SUSE, and Security

  • RSS Guard 3.7.0

    RSS Guard is a simple (yet powerful) feed reader. It is able to fetch the most known feed formats, including RSS/RDF and ATOM. It's free, it's open-source. RSS Guard currently supports Czech, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian. RSS Guard will never depend on other services - this includes online news aggregators like Feedly, The Old Reader and others.

  • Lf File Manager: Image Previews Sort Of Work I Guess
  • A Quick Look At Slackel 7.3 Openbox

    Slackel is a Linux distribution based on Slackware and Salix. It is fully compatible with Slackware but the difference is that it is based on the development branch. Slackel comes in three editions, KDE, Openbox and MATE. Today, I'm taking a look at the recently released Slackel 7.3 Openbox. 

  • Council policy proposal: Process for promoting Fedora deliverable to Edition

    With several Fedora deliverables ready (or nearly ready) to be promoted to Edition status, we need a policy for how this will work. After consulting with representatives from QA, Release Engineering, and Fedora IoT, I drafted a proposed process. The Council will begin voting on Tuesday 28 July in accordance with the policy change policy.

  • Storage solution and engaged partnership between Fujitsu and SUSE

    Fujitsu and SUSE have been partners for many years, and we are strategically collaborating on the needs and issues of customers in enterprise environments such as SUSE Business Critical Linux. At the online event SUSECON digital started from May 20, Fujitsu Keynote session will explain the solution development of both companies to the future market. At last year’s SUSECON, a technical session was conducted based on verification information on how to achieve system update and non-disruptive data migration to SUSE Enterprise Storage without stopping service and user access by Fujitsu and SUSE for existing Ceph environment. Please don’t miss Fujitsu Data Driven transformation sessions at SUSECON digital this year.

  • Updating Documentation for openSUSE Leap 15.2

    After having a Virtual Live Installation Party on YouTube yesterday (02 Jul 2020). I realized, I have to test and update documentation out there on my site as well as the openSUSE Wiki. This is one of those things that I do as I have time, generally. Essentially, this is what I have done for the last several years, not 100% consistently but generally speaking, I keep on top of it. In order to stay organized, I have a “personal” wiki page that I keep track of what it is that I maintain. [...] If you are using a “free” operating system, it isn’t free. It has taken work and love to make it possible for you to use it. People are making personal sacrifices, often without pay, to bring this wonderful tool for you to use. Find a way to contribute back, in whatever way is within your abilities and pay the good will forward. [...] I openly admit my almost unhealthy obsession for the openSUSE project, it is in my obsession that I feel compelled to contribute where ever I can. I am forever thankful for everyone that takes the time to make openSUSE, Linux and all the software that I use possible. The freedom and ability to use my computer that suits my requirements best is something for which I am continually grateful.

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  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 639

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 639 for the week of July 5 – 11, 2020. 

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (chromium, mailman, openjpeg2, ruby-rack, squid3, tomcat8, and xen), Fedora (botan2, kernel, LibRaw, mingw-OpenEXR, mingw-podofo, podofo, seamonkey, squid, and webkit2gtk3), Mageia (ffmpeg, mbedtls, mediawiki, and xpdf), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (bind, dbus, jbig2dec, and rh-nodejs12-nodejs), and SUSE (graphviz and xen).

Programming Leftovers

  • CMake-Based Qt Creator Snapshots

    About a year ago we started porting the build system that we use for building Qt Creator itself from qmake to CMake. Nowadays we are in the state that many Qt Creator developers use CMake for building Qt Creator for their daily work, but the official packages are still based on the qmake build.

  • Week #6 Progress [MyPaint Engine]

    Last week my prime focus was to add more and more settings in the preset editor and so as to make mypaint brushes a bit more customizable. I used KisCurveOptionWidget class which Krita already has and modified it so that it can accomodate the settings and dynamic mypaint brush options. This went on to become a lot more complicated than I anticipated. Although, it works fine there are still a lot of bugs and finishing required to mark this as complete.

  • Stack Abuse: What's New in Tensorflow 2.0?

    If you are a Machine Learning Engineer, Data Scientist, or a hobbyist developing Machine Learning Models from time to time just for fun, then it is very likely that you are familiar with Tensorflow. Tensorflow is an open-source and a free framework developed by Google Brain Team written in Python, C++, and CUDA. It is used to develop, test, and deploy Machine Learning models. Initially, Tensoflow did not have full support for multiple platforms and programming languages, and it was not very fast and efficient for training Machine Learning models, but with time and after a few updates, Tensorflow is now considered as a go-to framework for developing, training and deploying machine learning models.

  • Python 3.8.4

    The Python 3.8 series is the newest major release of the Python programming language, and it contains many new features and optimizations.

  • Python Insider: Python 3.8.4 is now available

    Python 3.8.4 is the fourth maintenance release of Python 3.8. Go get it here: https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-384/ Maintenance releases for the 3.8 series will continue at regular bi-monthly intervals, with 3.8.5 planned for mid-September 2020.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 68: Zero Matrix

    These are some answers to the Week 68 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • Microsoft Visual Studio gets .NET Core debugging – on WSL2 [Ed: Microsoft Tim reminds us again that WSL and WSL2 are an ATTACK on GNU/Linux the EEE way]

Gadgets and Devices: MemGlove/Arduino, Starburst and Axiomtek

  • The MemGlove detects hand poses and recognizes objects

    Hand movements have long been used as a computer interface method, but as reported here, the MemGlove from a team of MIT CSAIL researchers takes things several steps further. This augmented glove can sense hand poses and how it’s applying pressure to an object. The wearable uses a novel arrangement of 16 electrodes to detect hand position based on resistance, and six fluid filled tubes that transmit pressure depending on how an item is gripped. An Arduino Due is used to sense these interactions, which pass information on to a computer for processing. Pose verification is accomplished with a Leap Motion sensor. By training neural networks with TensorFlow, the glove is able to identify various hand poses, as well as distinguish between 30 different household things that are grasped.

  • Startups Push Aerospace Innovation

    Entrepreneurs developing lightweight propulsion systems for satellites, cybersecurity for Linux, wireless power and a blockchain application for secure part procurement, among other emerging technologies, presented their technologies to investors, the military and industry. In 10-minute intervals, the company representatives pitched their early stage, aerospace-related technologies at Starburst Accelerator’s third U.S. Virtual Selection Committee meeting on July 9th, which was held virtually. Headquartered in Paris, Starburst's U.S. team brought in the eight hopeful companies, all vying for partnership agreements, venture capitalist funding and a chance to join Starburst's Accelerator Program. The startups’ prospective products range in level of technical readiness and prototyping stages. As an aerospace technology incubator, Starburst has been operating for almost 7 years. Initially, the accelerator held specific events targeted at specific stakeholder groups, such as Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Air Force or certain investor groups, explained Van Espahbodi, co-founder and managing partner at Starburst. Today, Espahbodi said, they are constantly scouting emerging technology solutions for 50 clients in eight countries across 21 aerospace markets, from quantum sensors, to cybersecurity, to new energy sources and propulsion, he said.

  • Quad-GbE Apollo Lake appliance has dual mini-PCIe slots

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready “NA346” networking appliance is equipped with a Celeron N3350, 4x GbE ports with optional bypass, 2x USB 3.0, HDMI, and 2x mini-PCIe slots with mSATA and wireless support. Axiomtek has launched an entry-level “SD-WAN, VPN and security gateway for industrial IoT security applications.” The 146 x 118.2 x 33.5mm NA346 runs Yocto-based Linux or Win 10 on a dual-core, up to 2.4GHz Celeron N3350 with a 6W TDP from Intel’s Apollo Lake generation. The quad-GbE port networking appliance follows Axiomtek’s earlier, Apollo Lake based, 6-port NA345 and other Apollo Lake based networking gateways such as Acrosser’s 6-port AND-APL1N1FL.