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  • Getting started on your SAP HANA journey with RHEL 8 for SAP Solutions

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8, which was released at the Red Hat Summit in May 2019, can provide significant performance improvements across a range of modern workloads. 

    As of March 31, 2020, SAP officially announced the support for SAP HANA 2.0 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 for SAP Solutions on Intel 64 and IBM POWER9 architectures. 

    With this offering, SAP HANA is fully certified and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 for SAP Solutions as documented in SAP notes 2777782 and 2235581. Beyond the benefits provided by the latest version of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, RHEL 8 for SAP Solutions offers the following components...

  • CI/CD with OpenShift
  • Red Hat Audit to ‘Eradicate’ Problematic Language in Its Code

    Red Hat has become the latest software company pledging to remove "problematic" language from its platforms.

    In a blog post published to the company’s website, Chief Technology Officer Chris Wright said the company would be “standing up a team to audit our own work—our code, documentation and content—and identify potentially divisive language.”

    “When we looked at why certain words are still being used in open source, we questioned why they persisted and what we could do about it,” Wright told Motherboard in an email.        

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  • System Configuration Proc File System
  • Install VirtualBox 6.1 on Oracle Linux 8
  • Install VirtualBox 6.1 Extension Pack on Oracle Linux 8
  • An Easy Introduction to Open Source Projects

    So what is an open source project anyway? It seems like the answer should be easy. “It's openly available code,” right? Well, not necessarily. It all depends on how the project is licensed. A license tells other people what they can and cannot do with a project. A project like Unity is openly available but its license states it’s only available for reference, not for modification or redistribution. Other projects are openly available but have no license at all. According to copyright law, this means the project is automatically all rights reserved, meaning it’s illegal to do anything at all with the project without the author’s express permission.

    Neither of these examples are open source projects, because neither of them are licensed in a way that’s in accordance with the Open Source Definition (OSD). This is a set of 10 requirements that a project must meet to be considered “open source.” If a project doesn’t meet each one of those 10 requirements, it violates the OSD and, by definition, is not an open source project.

    The easiest way to make sure a project is actually open source is to look at the license under which it’s released. If it’s an Open Source Initiative-approved license, then you're guaranteed that the project meets all 10 of the requirements of the OSD and is definitely an open source project. That’s because the Open Source Initiative (OSI), the standards body that maintains and protects the OSD, has reviewed those licenses and confirmed that any project that uses one of them will provide the 10 requirements of the OSD. Projects that use a different non-approved license or no license at all cannot be guaranteed to be open source and may be risky or even illegal to use. Some popular OSI-approved licenses include GNU General Public License GPL, Apache License 2.0, MIT license, and the suite of Creative Commons licenses.

    [...]

    Some people contribute because they believe in the Four Freedoms and the power that these freedoms have to foster equality and equity for all people. Whatever reasons you have for wanting to contribute, always remember that’s exactly what those reasons are: yours. No one else will have the same needs, goals, or constraints. Your reasons are unique and personal.

  • We don't really own the digital possessions that we buy online

    The popularity of access-based consumption has obscured the rise of a range of fragmented ownership configurations in the digital realm. These provide the customer with an illusion of ownership while restricting their ownership rights. Companies such as Microsoft and Apple present consumers with the option to “buy” digital products such as eBooks. Consumers often make the understandable assumption that they will have full ownership rights over the products that they pay for, just as they have full ownership rights over the physical books that they buy from their local bookstore.

    However, many of these products are subject to end user licence agreements which set out a more complex distribution of ownership rights. These long legal agreements are rarely read by consumers when it comes to products and services online. And even if they do read them, they are unlikely to fully understand the terms.

    When purchasing eBooks, the consumer often actually purchases a non-transferable licence to consume the eBook in restricted ways. For instance, they may not be permitted to pass the eBook on to a friend once they have finished reading, as they might do with a physical book. Also, as we have seen in the case of Microsoft, the company retains the right to revoke access at a later date. These restrictions on consumer ownership are often encoded into digital goods themselves as automated forms of enforcement, meaning that access can be easily withdrawn or modified by the company.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly, Unfettered Freedom, TLLTS and Noodlings

  • Destination Linux 186: Quality Control in Linux, System76 Keyboard & DLN Game Fest!

    00:00 Intro 00:44 Welcome to DL186 01:06 Lower Deck 01:48 What Ryan has been up to 02:46 What Noah has been up to 07:11 What Michael has been up to 10:05 Digital Ocean https://do.co/dln 11:34 Community Feedback: Linux Mint’s System Reports 12:47 Noah’s suggestion to the Linux Foundation to help with Tech Support in Linux 13:59 What does the Linux Foundation do? 16:33 Send Us Feedback: comments@destinationlinux.org 17:06 News: System76 Reimagining The Keyboard 22:26 Security Advisory: Snapdragon Vulnerabilities (Android Users Need To Update) 25:21 Bitwarden https://bitwarden.com/dln 26:56 Topic of the Week: Quality Control in Linux (DLN Forum Thread) 41:21 DLN Game Fest on August 30th at 4PM Eastern! 43:48 Linux Gaming: Camp Canyonwood 45:18 Tip of the Week: /boot 47:17 ShellShock Added to DLN Game Fest by Patron Request 48:19 Software Spotlight: ProtonMail Bridge 48:52 Become a Patron of Destination Linux 50:15 DLN Store https://dlnstore.com 50:39 Join the DLN Community! (Ryan made Noah give up on the \being hip\ stuff this week lol) 52:14 More Great Content at DestinationLinux.Network 52:33 Journey itself . . . 52:39 Preview of the Patron Post Show

  • FLOSS Weekly 591: PLATO & The Rise of Cyberculture - Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations

    P.L.A.T.O. is an acronym for Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations. Before the internet, there was the PLATO system which was not only computer-based education but, surprisingly, the first online community. Doc Searls talks with Shawn Powers and Brian Dear who was the author of Friendly Orange Glow which is the first book on PLATO. The book discusses the importance of PLATO. PLATO was the original incubator for social computing: instant messaging, chat rooms, message forums, the world's first online newspaper, and so much more. PLATO also created flat-panel gas plasma displays and was one of the first systems with touch panels built-in to the screen. They discuss how PLATO and the rise of the cyberculture and the internet were due to the "Hacker Method" an agreement among early developers to share and have open code.

  • Unfettered Freedom, Ep. 2 - FSF Elects President, Emacs 27.1, Mozilla Layoffs, HBO Drops Linux

    Unfettered Freedom is a video podcast that focuses on news and topics about GNU/Linux, free software and open source software. On this freedom-packed episode: 0:00 - Intro 1:27 - Free Software Foundation finally elects a new president.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 870

    samsung chromebook review, developing on chromebook, arduino, keypad programming

  • Noodlings | BIOS Games Serving the NDI™ Plugin

    18 Episodes… 18 is a fun number. Divisible by 2, 3, 6 and 9. The age you can vote in the United States.

Java Programming

  • Java date format

    Date value needs to format for various programming purposes. One of the essential reasons to format the date is to represent the date value in a human-readable format. Many classes exist in Java to format the date value. DateTimeFormatter and SimpleDateFormat are two of them. These classes can be used to format date values in different ways. How these two classes can be used to format the date in Java is explained in this tutorial.

  • Java Enum Tutorial

    Java enum is a special Java type that defines by a Java class. It is also called the Java enumeration type. It is introduced in Java version 5 first, which is mainly used to define the collection of constants. The compile type of safety is ensured by using the enum type. So, when all possible values of the variable are known before compile time, then it is better to use enum type. It defines a class that always extends from java.lang.Enum. How enum type can be declared and used in Java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java Abstract Class

    The concept of the abstraction is to highlight the task of the object instead of highlighting, “how the object does the task”. This type of concept can be implemented by using two ways in Java. These are the abstract class and interface. Abstract class contains the keyword abstract. This class can not be initiated like other normal classes, but a subclass can be derived by inheriting the abstract class. The features of the abstract class can be accessed by creating the object of the subclass. An abstract class can also contain the constructor that can be accessed by creating the object of the subclass class. How you can use an abstract class in Java is shown in this tutorial.

  • Java exception handling

    When the normal flow of the program execution interrupts for any error, then it is called an exception. This type of event can be handled by using a try-catch-finally block. An exception is an object that is used to catch the error and run the statement based on the error condition that is called exception handling. Mainly two types of error are handled by exception handling. These are compiled time errors and run-time errors. The run-time errors are handled by exception handling. How you can handle exceptions in Java is explained in this tutorial.

KDE Neon 20.04 Review: Fast and Stable

If you are a KDE fan, like always, this is good news. The latest KDE Neon 20.04 operating system is here. #kde #KDENEON Read more

Android Leftovers