Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Will Reach End of Life on July 17th, 2020

Filed under
Ubuntu

Launched last year on October 17th, Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) shipped with the Linux 5.3 kernel series, the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment, initial support for ZFS as the root file system via the installer, support for DLNA sharing, WPA3 support, as well as Yaru light and dark themes.

Since it’s not an LTS (Long Term Support) release, Ubuntu 19.10 was mainly a testbed for Canonical to try new features. This also translates to the release not having any major changes and receiving only 9 months of support.

Therefore, on July 17th, 2020, Canonical will no longer support Ubuntu 19.10. This means that they will cease to provide software updates and security fixes for the distribution.

Read more

Ubuntu 19.10 Reaches End of Life This Month, Plan Those Upgrade

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Reaches End of Life This Month, Plan Those Upgrades Soon

    Any enthusiasts engaging on the extant edition past this date will need (read: want) to expedite plans to emigrate to the next available release, which is the fabulously fast Ubuntu 20.04 ‘Focal Fossa’.

    The Ubuntu 19.10 release arrived on October 17, 2019. As a non-LTS release it gets 9 months of on-going app updates and security patches.

    And those 9 months are almost up.

    After this date you won’t get new versions of Firefox or anything else, and many third-party developers stop building packages for unsupported Ubuntu releases.

Canonical Will No Longer Support Ubuntu 19.10 After July 17

  • Canonical Will No Longer Support Ubuntu 19.10 After July 17, 2020

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, has officially announced that Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” will reach its end-of-life (EOL) on July 17, 2020. This means the Ubuntu developer team will no longer provide security patches, bug fixes, or any other updates.

    Additionally, you won’t even get updates for installed applications. In fact, you won’t be able to install new software using apt-get command without manually modifying sources.list. Hence, if you’re using v19.10, you should upgrade your system to the latest long-term release Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa.

Ubuntu 19.10 set to reach end-of-life this month

  • Ubuntu 19.10 set to reach end-of-life this month

    Canonical is set to pull the plug on Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’ some time this month. If previous release cycles are anything to go by, support could end anywhere between mid- to late-July so that gives you about a week to get ready to upgrade. If you do not upgrade, your system will not receive any new updates which could leave it open to exploitation.

    Canonical, helpfully, has put together a simple guide which will help you move from Ubuntu 19.10 to the recently released Ubuntu 20.04, while Ubuntu upgrades tend to be safe, be sure to heed the warning at the start of the tutorial about backing up your files as things could mess up, although it’s unlikely.

Ubuntu 19.10 is getting killed off on July 17

  • Ubuntu 19.10 is getting killed off on July 17 – so make sure you upgrade

    For anyone running the Ubuntu 19.10 Linux distribution, you have until July 17 to update to a newer version, as Canonical, the company behind the distro, has announced that after that date, version 19.10 (also known as “Eoan Ermine”) will enter its end of life.

    That means Ubuntu 19.10 will no longer receive important security patches, updates and fixes. Most installed applications won’t get updates, and you’ll won't be able to install new apps either.

Lubuntu 19.10 End of Life and Current Support Statuses

  • Lubuntu 19.10 End of Life and Current Support Statuses

    Lubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) was released October 17, 2019 and will reach End of Life on Friday, July 17, 2020. This means that after that date there will be no further security updates or bugfixes released. We highly recommend that you update to 20.04 as soon as possible if you are still running 19.10.

    After July 17th, the only supported releases of Lubuntu will be 18.04, with LXDE, and 20.04, with LXQt. All other releases of Lubuntu will be considered unsupported, and will no longer receive any further updates from the Lubuntu team.

    You can find instructions on how to upgrade your Lubuntu installation here at our manual page.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

today's howtos

Julia v1.5.0 has been released

Thank you to everyone who made this year’s JuliaCon great! As a parting gift, the Julia developers are pleased to announce the release of Julia v1.5.0, the fifth minor release in the 1.x series. Jeff and Stefan put together a blog post highlighting some of the most exciting new features in 1.5. Check it out! As usual, binaries are available for all of your favorite platforms (Linux, macOS, Windows, and FreeBSD) at https://julialang.org/downloads. As a minor release, v1.5.0 contains no breaking changes, only new features, performance improvements, and marginal, undisruptive changes in behavior. You can also see the NEWS file for the full set of changes. Note that like 1.5, like its predecessor 1.4, does not have long term support. As of this release 1.4 has been effectively superseded by 1.5, which means that there will not likely be any further 1.4.x releases. Julia 1.0 is still currently the only long term support version. We encourage everyone to give it a try. Packages can test with 1.5.0 on CI by specifying 1.5 on Travis, AppVeyor, Cirrus, and GitHub Actions. As always, let us know in the issue tracker if you run into any issues. Read more Also: Julia 1.5 has been released

Meet Super Container OS, a Debian-Based Live Distro with a Built-In Container Engine

I told you I love new projects, right? Well, today I have a brand-new distro that I’d like to introduce you to, called Super Container OS, and targeted at developers who want to run containerized apps. The Super Container OS developer Harshad Joshi pinged me earlier on Twitter earlier to check out his new distro, which he says it’s a live and installable Linux OS that comes pre-loaded with a container engine powered by Docker and systemd-nspawn. Based on the Bufferstack.IO computing platform, Super Container OS wants to be the ideal tool for those who want to create, deploy and distribute apps that can run on IIoT Gateways, servers, or even virtual machines. Now that Container Linux from CoreOS is no more, I guess we need more alternatives. Super Container OS is based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” operating system series and aims to make deploying, running and managing containerized applications easier by using OS level virtualization. Read more Also: Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - July 2020