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Book Review: Code Craft

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Books on programming language x, technology y, and methodology z are 10 a penny. Bookshop shelves groan under the weight of books promising to teach programming x, y or z in 21 days, 7 days, 24 hours, 10 minutes, 30 seconds…

Developers are not exempt from the lure of instant wisdom and there are plenty of publishers and authors ready with promises of fast roads to gurudom.

On the other hand, books devoted to the everyday craft of programming are far less common, particularly those that seek to impart the hard lessons gained from long experience churning out code in the real world. Peter Goodliffe's Code Craft is definitely in the latter camp, aiming to be a hard-copy mentor to those just starting out in the world of professional programming.

Adopting a no-nonsense tone from the outset, Goodliffe seeks to guide the reader into
the ways of the world - at least that part of the world he calls the code face. To this end, he looks at all aspects of development, from coding through to design, architecture, source control, code reviews, requirements, and more.

Full Story.

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