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today's leftovers

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  • Linuxfx 10.3 WX overview | to work at home!

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linuxfx 10.3 WX and some of the applications pre-installed.

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  • Norbert Preining: [Debian] KDE/Plasma Status Update 2020-07-04

    Great timing for 4th of July, here is another status update of KDE/Plasma for Debian. Short summary: everything is now available for Debian sid and testing, for both i386 and am64 architectures!

    With Qt 5.14 arriving in Debian/testing, and some tweaks here and there, we finally have all the packages (2 additional deps, 82 frameworks, 47 Plasma, 216 Apps) built on both Debian unstable and Debian testing, for both amd64 and i386 architectures. Again, big thanks to OBS!

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/27

    Week 27 has mostly been in the light of the release of openSUSE Leap 15.2. With the developers mostly focusing on getting the best Leap release yet out of the door, it’s just natural that Tumbleweed has seen a bit less of churn. But honestly: has it? We have released 6 snapshots during this week so that does not talk for the ‘less active development’ of Tumbleweed during this period. The snapshots released were 0625, 0626, 0627, 0628, 0630, and 0701.

  • Demystifying Kubeflow pipelines: Data science workflows on Kubernetes – Part 1

    Kubeflow Pipelines are a great way to build portable, scalable machine learning workflows. It is one part of a larger Kubeflow ecosystem that aims to reduce the complexity and time involved with training and deploying machine learning models at scale.

    In this blog series, we demystify Kubeflow pipelines and showcase this method to produce reusable and reproducible data science.

    We go over why Kubeflow brings the right standardization to data science workflows, followed by how this can be achieved through Kubeflow pipelines.

    In part 2, we will get our hands dirty! We’ll make use of the Fashion MNIST dataset and the Basic classification with Tensorflow example, and take a step-by-step approach to turn the example model into a Kubeflow pipeline so that you can do the same.

  • Why Docker?

    Before discussing Docker, it is important for you to understand what microservices are. Consider a very large application that is broken down into smaller services. Each of those services can be termed as microservices. Microservices are small processes that communicate with each other over a network. For example, consider an online shopping application that can be broken down into smaller microservices, such as the user-accounts service, product catalog, order server, and shopping cart server.

    [...]

    Docker resolves this inefficiency problem by running several microservices in the same VM through running various containers for each microservice. Docker is an open-source application that helps you create, deploy, and run applications with the help of a container. Docker containers are small and lightweight VM alternatives that use the host operating system and use up relatively fewer resources.

    To understand Docker, first, you must understand what is the problem statement that Docker is trying to resolve. Here, the problem is that after designing a project, it might run perfectly fine on your system initially, but has trouble opening on other systems and servers. As soon as you move the project to the production stage, on someone else’s computer or on some other server, the project does not show the same level of performance, same level of working, or same optimization, even when you move that project from one place to another.

    For example, when you develop a website by using ASP.net or PHP, and you work on it and move the project to the web server, there are some uncertainties that could occur. This includes images not properly loading, or perhaps a bit difference or glitch in the path. On the developer’s machine, everything may work perfectly, but it might not work the same when moved to another machine.

More in Tux Machines

Redo Rescue Backup and Recovery Live System Gets NFS Share Support, SSH Server

For those not in the know, Redo Rescue is a great, free and easy to use live Linux system based on Debian GNU/Linux that can help you whenever your computer is broken by letting you backup and restore an entire system in just a few minutes. For example, if your computer no longer boots after installing the recent BootHole patches for the GRUB2 bootloader, you can use Redo Rescue to repair the boot. Of course, there are a few other tools that can do the same, but Redo Rescue can also do bare metal restores by replacing the MBR and partition table, re-map original data to a different target partition and even verify the integrity of an existing backup image. Read more

Pocket P.C. design files released as open source (handheld Linux computer)

The Popcorn Computers Pocket P.C. is designed to be a handheld Linux computer with a 4.95 inch full HD display, a built-in keyboard, and a ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor. First unveiled in November 2019, the Pocket P.C. hasn’t shipped yet. It’s still up for pre-order for $199 and up. But the developers have already open sourced the hardware by releasing the latest design files. You can find the at the project’s GitHub page. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Toolchain Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Toolchain Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference! The GNU toolchain has direct impact on the development of the Linux kernel and it is imperative that the developers of both ecosystems have an understanding of each other’s needs. Linux Plumbers is the perfect venue for the two communities to interact, and the GNU Toolchain microconference’s purpose is to facilitate that happening. Last year’s meetup at Linux Plumbers proved that it is critical that the two communities communicate with each other. As a result of last year’s microconference, the GNU toolchain has completed adding support for BPF, in a more flexible and usable way and system call wrappers in glibc were improved. There have been security features derived from the discussions, such as zeroing of registers when entering a function and implicit initialization of atomics.

  • Noodlings | Hardware is for the Terminal

    18 is such an adult number. Perhaps I am truly becoming a grown up podcast here. [...] This is another gift to future me from present me. I made the mistake of not properly writing this down before so I had to search for the answer. The problem is, sometimes, it seems as though Plasma is not shutting off my external screens consistently. I can’t say why but I have a suspicion that it is due to a specific communication application as I can almost guarantee that it is preventing my screens from turning off. I don’t have definitive proof of this so I am not going to put it in writing.

  • IWB (the man who brought GNU/Linux to IBM): Are We Becoming a Decadent, Stagnating Society?

    Earlier this year I read a very interesting essay, “The Age of Decadence”, by NY Times columnist Ross Douthat. The essay is adapted from his recently published book The Decadent Society - How We Became the Victims of Our Own Success. This long essay covers a lot of ground, from technology and innovation to politics and religion. The essay was published in early February, before Covid-19 spread across the US. I’ll discuss the original essay, but I do wonder how it would have been modified to reflect the impact of the pandemic. “The real story of the West in the 21st century is one of stalemate and stagnation,” wrote Douthat. “Everyone knows that we live in a time of constant acceleration, of vertiginous change, of transformation or looming disaster everywhere you look. Partisans are girding for civil war, robots are coming for our jobs, and the news feels like a multicar pileup every time you fire up Twitter. Our pessimists see crises everywhere; our optimists insist that we’re just anxious because the world is changing faster than our primitive ape-brains can process.” “But what if the feeling of acceleration is an illusion, conjured by our expectations of perpetual progress and exaggerated by the distorting filter of the internet?,” he asked. What if we really inhabit an era in which repetition is more the norm than invention; in which new developments in science and technology consistently undercover; in which we’re comfortably aging, “no longer optimistic about the future… [while] growing old unhappily together.” What if “Our civilization has entered into decadence.”

  • Matrix encrypted chat rolls out across Germany, Project ACRN's new IoT release, and more open source news

    In this week’s edition of our open source news roundup, an open source microfluidics pump, Germany rolls out an encrypted messaging platform based on Matrix, and more open source news.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-32

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Nest With Fedora is happening now! Fedora 33 branch day is Tuesday.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in July 2020

    This month I accepted 434 packages and rejected 54. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 475.

  • Improvements to Merge Proposals by the Janitor

    The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor. Since the original post, merge proposals created by the janitor now include the debdiff between a build with and without the changes (showing the impact to the binary packages), in addition to the merge proposal diff (which shows the impact to the source package).

  • 10 Best Free Neovim GUIs

    Vim is a highly configurable, powerful, console-based, open source text editor. It’s efficient, letting users edit files with a minimum of keystrokes. Vim offers word completion, undo, shortcuts, abbreviations, keyboard customization, macros, and scripts. You can turn this into your editor for your environment. [...] To use Neovim, you can use the program in a terminal emulator. Alternatively, there’s the option of using a third party GUI designed for Neovim. Neither Vim nor Neovim were built for beauty. However, many users prefer a graphical interface combined with the power of Neo(vim). One interesting aspect of Neovim’s RPC support is that developers can create new front-ends for Neovim that are outside of the terminal. This article seems to highlight the best free and open source front-ends for Neovim. Here’s our recommendations. The vast majority of the software featured in this article is cross-platform.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RVowpalWabbit 0.0.15: Some More CRAN Build Issues

    Another maintenance RVowpalWabbit package update brought us to version 0.0.15 earlier today. We attempted to fix one compilation error on Solaris, and addressed a few SAN/UBSAN issues with the gcc build. As noted before, there is a newer package rvw based on the excellent GSoC 2018 and beyond work by Ivan Pavlov (mentored by James and myself) so if you are into Vowpal Wabbit from R go check it out.

  • GSoC'20 progress : Phase II

    And just like that, the second phase of my project for Google Summer of Code is done. The evaluation results have arrived and I have passed successfully. I am thankful to my mentors for providing help and guidance throughout this project.

  • [LibreOffice] Week 9 Report

    The last week was the 9th week of coding weeks in GSoC program. I almost finished my final exams period I will start to work again with the regular rate.

  • Simulating a Turing Machine with Python and executing programs on it

    In this article, we shall implement a basic version of a Turing Machine in python and write a few simple programs to execute them on the Turing machine. This article is inspired by the edX / MITx course Paradox and Infinity and few of the programs to be executed on the (simulated) Turing machine are taken from the course. Also, some programs are from this Cambridge tutorial.

  • Congress To Consider National Right To Repair Law For First Time

    About five years ago, frustration at John Deere's draconian tractor DRM culminated in a grassroots "right to repair" movement. The company's crackdown on "unauthorized repairs" turned countless ordinary citizens into technology policy activists, after DRM and the company's EULA prohibited the lion's share of repair or modification of tractors customers thought they owned. These restrictions only worked to drive up costs for owners, who faced either paying significantly more money for "authorized" repair, or toying around with pirated firmware just to ensure the products they owned actually worked.

  • Victory! EFF Defends Public’s Right to Access Court Records About Patent Ownership

    The public’s right of access to court proceedings is well-established as a legal principle, but it needs constant defending. In part, that’s because private parties keep asking publicly-funded courts to resolve their disputes in secret. As we and others have written before, this problem is especially great in patent cases, where parties on opposite sides of a case often agree with each other to keep as much of the litigation as possible hidden from view. That deprives the public of material it has every right to see that could affect its rights to engage, like documents establishing (or undermining) a patent owner’s right to bring suit on the basis of a patent which they claim to own.

    Although this problem is pervasive, when we looked at a lawsuit filed by Uniloc—one of the most litigious patent trolls in the world—the amount of secrecy the parties agreed to was shocking. In Uniloc v. Apple, important, dispositive motion papers were filed with entire pages of text redacted, including information that could not possibly qualify as confidential, like case law citations. And what were those papers about? Whether Uniloc had the right to sue anyone, including Apple, for infringing the patents in the case. Because Uniloc is a prolific patent litigant—filing more than 170 patent infringement lawsuits in 2018 alone—questions about its right to sue have powerful ramifications on the public, including makers and users of a wide array of technology products.

  • The US declared war on TikTok because it can’t handle the truth

    TikTok does gather a lot of personal data, but it’s no more than what Facebook and other social networks also gather. The difference between TikTok and Facebook is that we have a great deal of transparency into the process by which Facebook gives your information to various governments. And specifically, Facebook does not release data to the Chinese government.

  • Trump’s WeChat ban could touch everything from Spotify to League of Legends

    Tencent is one of the largest tech companies in the world, and it’s spent the last few years buying stakes in video game studios, music companies, and social media apps. It’s bigger than ByteDance, and with significant ownership stakes in Snap, Blizzard, Spotify, and others, it’s far more embedded in the global tech industry. Yesterday’s order made those connections much more dangerous, even if they fall outside the narrow legal consequences of the order. As Tencent responds and its business partners are forced to choose sides, the consequences could be far broader than the White House realizes — and far more damaging to the average consumer.

  • Trump ban of Tencent Holdings could affect Fortnite, League of Legends and other games

    The crux of both orders lies within Section 1 (a), whose language differs only in the named company. “The following actions shall be prohibited beginning 45 days after the date of this order, to the extent permitted under applicable law: any transaction that is related to WeChat by any person, or with respect to any property, subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, with Tencent Holdings Ltd. (a.k.a. Téngxùn Kònggǔ Yǒuxiàn Gōngsī), Shenzhen, China, or any subsidiary of that entity, as identified by the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary) under section 1(c) of this order.”

    In the case of Tencent, that would mean customers in the United States would be banned from engaging with Tencent-owned games or subsidiaries. What's not clear is whether those users would also be prohibited from engaging with companies in which Tencent has an interest.

  • TikTok and WeChat: Chinese apps dogged by security fears

    Tencent surpassed Facebook's net worth after it became the first Asian firm to be valued at more than $500 billion in 2017.

    The Hong Kong-listed company now has a market capitalisation of HK$5.32 trillion ($686 billion), compared with Facebook's $756 billion.

  • Have I Been Pwned Set to Go Open-Source

    “I need to choose the right parts of the project to open up in the right way at the right time,” he said. “The transition from completely closed to completely open will happen incrementally, bit-by-bit and in a fashion that’s both manageable and responsible.”

    He added, “I want to get to a point where everything possible is open. I want the infrastructure configuration to be open too and I want the whole thing to be self-sustaining by the community.”

Devices: Axiomtek, RasPi and More

  • Tough Apollo Lake box offers IP40 protection

    Axiomtek’s rugged, IP40-protected “eBOX626-311-FL” embedded PC runs Linux or Win 10 on Apollo Lake with 2x GbE, 6x USB, 3x serial, SATA, mSATA dual mini-PCIe, and wide range power. Axiomtek announced a fanless, Intel Apollo Lake based embedded computer that supports Linux, Win 10 IoT, and the company’s AMS.AXView remote monitoring software. The eBOX626-311-FL is designed for industrial controllers, intelligent robotic control, intelligent gateway systems, smart kiosks, and visual inspection and data visualization systems.

  • Processing raw image files from a Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera
  • Linux tip: How to reset device connected to USB port

    Sometimes devices connected to USB ports need to be re-set. It’s not unusual GSM modems and WiFi dongles to freeze and the only way to bring them back to life is to remove and re-attach.

    OLinuXino USB ports has power switches and current limiters which can be controller by Linux drivers.

  • Upcoming review: something POWERful

    I don’t yet know what exact specifications my review unit will have, but I’m assuming it’ll be the base model that has the 4-core POWER9 processor with SMT4 (4-way multithreading). I do know it’ll come with an AMD Radeon Pro WX4100 LP, which will be the only piece of hardware requiring card-side proprietary firmware (but it’s optional, since the mainboard itself has basic open source graphics capability too). I don’t usually do this, but there’s a first thing for everything, so here we go: do any of you have any questions about this exotic hardware you want me to try and answer? Specific things to look into? I’ll also be able to ask some questions to Raptor’s CTO, so there’s a lot of opportunity to get some serious answers.