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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Pocket Lisp Computer

    I recently built three Lisp Badge computers with some help from my kids. I bought a hot air soldering station and learned TQFP soldering. The kids did some through-hole and SMT soldering and really enjoyed it!

    The hardware assembly and debugging process was really fun, other than worrying several times that I had put too much heat into a component, or set the wrong programmable fuse. During that phase I received some advice from the board’s designer, which really helped.

    I’ve learned from the hardware people at work to always order extra parts, and I did, including an extra PCB. I was half expecting to damage stuff while learning, so I was really happy that we ended up with all three boards fully working, after locating and fixing some cold solder joints.

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  • CY's Take on PWC#067

    This is a part of Perl Weekly Challenge(PWC) and the followings are related to my solutions. 

    [...]

    The discussion of Perl 7 in blogs.perl.org # was so hot last week made me too shy to write PWC experience (stop, it's just an excuse!).

    Some discussions were quite technical for a beginner. Anyway as a beginning coder in Perl 5, I would add "use warnings" in my final coding stage from now on to prepare for the change.

  • Glyph Lefkowitz: Zen Guardian

    Moshe wrote a blog post a couple of days ago which neatly constructs a wonderful little coding example from a scene in a movie. And, as we know from the Zen of Python quote, there should only be one obvious way to do something in Python. So my initial reaction to his post was of course to do it differently — to replace an __init__ method with the new @dataclasses.dataclass decorator.

    But as I thought about the code example more, I realized there are a number of things beyond just dataclasses that make the difference between “toy”, example-quality Python, and what you’d do in a modern, professional, production codebase today.

  • Ian Ozsvald: Weekish notes

    I gave another iteration of my Making Pandas Fly talk sequence for PyDataAmsterdam recently and received some lovely postcards from attendees as a result. I’ve also had time to list new iterations of my training courses for Higher Performance Python (October) and Software Engineering for Data Scientists (September), both will run virtually via Zoom & Slack in the UK timezone.

    I’ve been using my dtype_diet tool to time more performance improvements with Pandas and I look forward to talking more on this at EuroPython this month.

  • Quickly Use Bootstrap 4 in a Django Template with a CDN
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: [Week 5] Check-in
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #6
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In: Week 6

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