Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

foresight linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

To set expectations, this post is part mini-review of Foresight, part comparison to Ubuntu, and just my opinions and thoughts on Foresight after using another distribution for almost 3 years.

I burned the DVD on my Ubuntu box, popped it in to my second box, and was greeted with a blast from the past: the Anaconda installer. Prior to becoming an Ubuntu user, I mostly used Red Hat and later Fedora for almost 5 years. Going through Foresight’s installation GUI, while branded Foresight, is a re-branded Fedora install, and there’s nothing wrong with that, it worked great. My box is pretty standard hardware - P4 3.0ghz, Intel stock 865 board, Nvidia (BFG) 6800, 2 DVD drives, 2 IDE Hard drives, and 2 gigs of RAM.

Installation was quick, a reboot, a little more configuration, and I was presented with the Foresight desktop.

Visuals

It’s a nice clean look - it looks to be a custom theme, with Tango-ified icons everywhere.

More Here.

Also on same site:

It’s official: I’ve switched to Foresight from Ubuntu on my main computer. As I posted a few days ago in my review of Foresight, I’ve been really impressed with the distribution and the community around Foresight. The community was what made the decision easy. I would have never believed even two weeks ago.

switched to foresight linux

More in Tux Machines

Android/ChromeOS/Google Leftovers

Games: SC-Controller 0.4.2, Campo Santo, Last Epoch and More

Android Leftovers

Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more