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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • DevOps Tools: Why We Don't Need More CI/CD Suites
  • How to install the Go language on Linux

    Go is one programming language that's on the rise. In fact, according to Popularity of Programming Languages, Go is at No. 14 and steadily climbing up the ranks. Go is used specifically for distributed systems and highly-scalable network servers and has replaced C++ and Java in Google's software stack.

    Chances are, you'll be using Go sometime soon. For those who develop on Linux, you can't just install it from the standard repositories. So how do you install this popular programming language on the open source operating system? Fear not, I'm going to show you.

  • What if? Revision control systems did not have merge

    A fun design exercise is to take an established system or process and introduce some major change into it, such as adding a completely new constraint. Then take this new state of things, run with it and see what happens. In this case let's see how one might design a revision control system where merging is prohibited.

  • What you need to know about hash functions

    There is a tool in the security practitioner's repertoire that's helpful for everyone to understand, regardless of what they do with computers: cryptographic hash functions. That may sound mysterious, technical, and maybe even boring, but I have a concise explanation of what hashes are and why they matter to you.

    A cryptographic hash function, such as SHA-256 or MD5, takes as input a set of binary data (typically as bytes) and gives output that is hopefully unique for each set of possible inputs. The length of the output—"the hash"—for any particular hash function is typically the same for any pattern of inputs (for SHA-256, it is 32 bytes or 256 bits—the clue's in the name). The important thing is this: It should be computationally implausible (cryptographers hate the word impossible) to work backward from the output hash to the input. This is why they are sometimes referred to as one-way hash functions.

    But what are hash functions used for? And why is the property of being unique so important?

  • GStreamer 1.17.2 unstable development release

    The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the second development release in the unstable 1.17 release series.

    The unstable 1.17 release series adds new features on top of the current stable 1.16 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework.

    The unstable 1.17 release series is for testing and development purposes in the lead-up to the stable 1.18 series which is scheduled for release in a few weeks time. Any newly-added API can still change until that point, although it is rare for that to happen.

    Full release notes will be provided in the near future, highlighting all the new features, bugfixes, performance optimizations and other important changes.

    The autotools build has been dropped entirely for this release, so it's finally all Meson from here on.

  • Qt Design Studio - Sketch Bridge Tutorial Part 1

    Welcome to this Qt Design Studio Sketch Bridge Tutorial, to follow along with this you will need the commercial Qt Design Studio 1.5 Package and Sketch Bridge, macOS and Sketch installed (I'm using 66.1).

    With this tutorial I want to show you how to build up a sketch project that creates a clean export and import into Qt Design Studio (which i will refer to as qds for the rest of the tutorial), uses symbols and instances for proper componentization and goes back and forth from Sketch to qds in iterative loops building up a more complex scene from simple building blocks. I'll also cover some of the most common issues i come across from other users and the tips and tricks I've developed while working with the Bridge Plugin.

    I think it's important before we start to clarify that although Sketch allows designers to achieve their design concepts in a flexible and open ended manner, in order to have a pixel perfect design built around developer friendly components in qds, it is very important to structure and prepare your project in a certain manner, and although that is not overly complex to learn it does take some time and knowledge to do it well. My hope is this tutorial will provide you with the necessary experience to bring your designs much closer to this point. With this caveat out the way let's dive right in and start designing.

    [...]

    Now we have the default background state for the button let’s create the other two states we want to use for this tutorial, a hover and pressed state.

    We can do this by duplicating our original rectangle, renaming the layers and then putting them side by side for now so we can see the design changes in parallel, to make this a bit easier we can drag the symbol width out so we can fit our buttons side by side, we will be resizing this after we are done with the design.

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Solidity

    Solidity is an object-oriented, high-level language for implementing smart contracts. Solidity lets you program on Ethereum, a blockchain-based virtual machine that allows the creation and execution of smart contracts, without requiring centralized or trusted parties.

    Solidity is statically typed, supports inheritance, libraries and complex user-defined types among other features.

    With Solidity you can create contracts for uses such as voting, crowdfunding, blind auctions, and multi-signature wallets.

    Solidity was influenced by C++, Python and JavaScript. Like objects in OOP, each contract contains state variables, functions, and common data types. Contract-specific features include modifier (guard) clauses, event notifiers for listeners, and custom global variables.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Audiocasts/Screecasts, Linux App Summit, LIMBAS and More

  • BunsenLabs Linux Lithium overview | Crunchbang Reborn

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of BunsenLabs Linux Lithium and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Why Do You Guys Want Linux Creators To Record Outside

    For some reason people seem to like the outside Linux rants so I thought I'd explain why they went away and how I'm planning to bring them back, they're very easy to make so I feel like I'm generally just being lazy when I put one of these out but if you guys want them I guess I can't say no.

  • There's going to be an online Linux App Summit this November

    Are you interested in helping to make Linux a great end-user platform? Or perhaps you just want to listen to speeches and find out more info from those working on it? Mark November 12-14 on your calendar. This is the date of the upcoming 2020 Linux App Summit, an event co-hosted by GNOME and KDE as they work to bring everyone together to push Linux further. LAS will have a range of different talks, panels, and Q&As on a wide range of topics covering everything: creating, packaging, and distributing apps, to monetization within the Linux ecosystem and much more.

  • LIMBAS: Build a Database-Powered Enterprise Apps with ease

    LIMBAS is a framework for building enterprise applications for medium and large-scale companies. With LIMBAS you don't need to re-invent the wheel or start from scratch as it offers you the tools for building highly performed applications. LIMBAS is a good option for prototyping because it's fast, offers powerful tools that ease the production. It can be used to create all sort of databased powered applications. The project is already used by several companies in Europe (Germany and Switzerland).

  • Slovak procurement office recommends making licence requirements specific

    Public services in the Slovak Republic that wish to avoid IT vendor lock-in have been advised to make their licence requirements clear – for example by requesting open source – when procuring software and related services. This is one of the recommendations in a case study published last April by the country’s public procurement office and Slovensko.Digital, a non-profit organisation promoting open government and government modernisation.

  • Adding a fiber link to my home network

    Replacing this particular connection with a fiber connection was a smooth process overall, and I would recommend it in other situations as well.

    I would claim that it is totally feasible for anyone with an hour of patience to learn how to put a field assembly connector onto a fiber cable.

    If labor cost is expensive in your country or you just like doing things yourself, I can definitely recommend this approach. In case you mess the connector up and don’t want to fix it yourself, you can always call an electrician!

  • New Training Course Explores Open Source CI/CD Tool Jenkins X

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the availability of a new training course, LFS268 - CI/CD with Jenkins X. LFS268, developed in conjunction with the Continuous Delivery Foundation, is designed for site reliability engineers, software developers and architects, DevOps engineers and others who need to not only master continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD), but also gain a deeper understanding of the cloud-native ecosystem.

  • Participate in the 2020 Open Source Jobs Report!

    The Linux Foundation has partnered with edX to update the Open Source Jobs Report, which was last produced in 2018. The report examines the latest trends in open source careers, which skills are in demand, what motivates open source job seekers, and how employers can attract and retain top talent. In the age of COVID-19, this data will be especially insightful both for companies looking to hire more open source talent, as well as individuals looking to advance or change careers.

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Jonathan Carter: GameMode in Debian

    About two years ago, I ran into some bugs running a game on Debian, so installed Windows 10 on a spare computer and ran it on there. I learned that when you launch a game in Windows 10, it automatically disables notifications, screensaver, reduces power saving measures and gives the game maximum priority. I thought “Oh, that’s actually quite nice, but we probably won’t see that kind of integration on Linux any time soon”. The very next week, I read the initial announcement of GameMode, a tool from Feral Interactive that does a bunch of tricks to maximise performance for games running on Linux.

  • Mike Gabriel: No Debian LTS Work in July 2020

    In July 2020, I was originally assigned 8h of work on Debian LTS as a paid contributor, but holiday season overwhelmed me and I did not do any LTS work, at all.

  • Opinion: Robots are proving themselves now more than ever

    By Rhys Davies, product manager for robotics, Snapcraft and Ubuntu Appliances at Canonical, the publisher of Ubuntu

  • Kubernetes 1.19 release candidate available for testing

    The Kubernetes 1.19 release candidate is now available for download and experimentation ahead of general availability later this month. You can try it now with MicroK8s.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 643

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 643 for the week of August 2 – 8, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

Linux Devices and Open Hardware

  • Mini-PC and SBC build on Whiskey Lake

    Supermicro’s 3.5-inch “X11SWN-H-WOHS” SBC and “SYS-E100-9W-H” mini-PC based it feature an 8th Gen UE-series CPU, HDMI and DP, 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, 2x GbE, and 3x M.2. Supermicro has launched a fanless, 8th Gen Whiskey Lake SBC and mini-PC. The SYS-E100-9W-H mini-PC (or SuperServer E100-9W-H), which was reported on by Fanless Tech, is certified only to run Windows 10, but the 3.5-inch X11SWN-H-WOHS SBC supports Ubuntu. Applications include industrial automation, retail, smart medical expert systems, kiosks, interactive info systems, and digital signage.

  • Exor nanoSOM nS02 System-on-Module Features the 800MHz version of STM32MP1 Processor

    Exor provides a Linux RT board support package (BSP) or Android BSP for the module which also fully supports the company’s X Platform including Exor Embedded Open HMI software, Corvina Cloud IIoT platform, and IEC61131 CODESYS or Exor xPLC runtime.

  • Onyx Boox Poke2 Color eReader Launched for $299

    Manga and comics fans, rejoice! After years of getting black & white eReaders, the first commercial color eReaders are coming to market starting with Onyx Boox Poke2 Color eReader sold for $299 (but sadly sold out at the time of writing). The eReader comes with a 6-inch, 1448 x 1072 E-Ink display that supports up to 4096 colors, and runs Android 9.0 on an octa-core processor coupled with 2GB RAM and 32GB storage.

  • xDrill Smart Power Drill Supports Intelligent Speed/Torque, Laser Measuring, Digital Leveling (Crowdfunding)

    Many home appliances now have smart functions, and in my cases, I fail to see the added value, and I’m not sure why I’d want/need a connected refrigerator with a touchscreen display. So when I first saw somebody make a “smart” power drill with a small touchscreen display I laughed. But after having a closer look, Robbox xDrill smart power drill could actually be a very useful device saving you time and helping work better.

  • Raspberry Pi calls out your custom workout routine
  • Odyssey Blue: A powerful x86 and Arduino machine that supports Windows 10 and Linux

    It has been a few months since we reported on the Odyssey, a single-board computer (SBC) designed by Seeedstudio. Unlike many SBCs, the Odyssey, or ODYSSEY-X86J4105800 to give it its full name, supported the x86 instruction set. While the Odyssey can run Windows 10, it is also compatible with the Arduino ecosystem. Now, Seeedstudio has expanded on the design of the Odyssey with the Odyssey Blue.

  • Bring two analog meters out of retirement to display temperature and humidity

    Tom of Build Comics created a unique analog weather station that shows temperature and humidity on a pair of recycled gauges. An Arduino Nano reads the levels using a DHT22 sensor and outputs them in the proper format for each display. Both units have a new printed paper backing to indicate conditions, along with a trimmer pot for calibration. To set the build off nicely, the Nano and other electronics are housed inside a beautiful custom wooden box, to which the antique meters are also affixed.