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Original Articles from 2006

  1. What's New in Symphony OS 2006-12 - Dec 25, 2006
  2. openSUSE 10.2 Final Report - Dec 23, 2006
  3. Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 2) - Dec 21, 2006
  4. Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 1) - Dec 19, 2006
  5. openSUSE 10.2 Changelog & Version Report - Dec 15, 2006
  6. The KANOTIX distro implodes - Nov 30, 2006
  7. Another Sabayon Linux 3.2 Look (from a non-Gentoo user) - Nov 26, 2006
  8. openSUSE 10.2 RC 1 Report - Nov. 25, 2006
  9. MiniTutor: Shell Colors and Cursor Positions - Nov 17, 2006
  10. Quick Look at Urli OS 6.10 - Nov. 13, 2006
  11. openSUSE 10.2 Beta 2 Report - Nov 12, 2006
  12. MiniTutor: MPlayer and Video Output - Nov 6, 2006
  13. Another OpenSUSE 10.2 Beta 1 Review - Oct 29, 2006
  14. openSUSE 10.2 Beta 1 Report - Oct 29, 2006
  15. Howto: ATI fglrx driver + Xgl + compiz on Debian Sid for KDE users - Oct 21, 2006
  16. openSUSE 10.2 Alpha 5 Report - Oct 09, 2006
  17. SLED 10 rocks! - Oct 4, 2006
  18. Countdown to Final: Mandriva 2007 RC2 - Sep 19, 2006
  19. openSUSE 10.2 Alpha 4 Report - Sep 08, 2006
  20. Ubuntu Christian Edition 1.2 - Sep 04, 2006
  21. Mandriva 2007 Beta 3 Report - Sep 02, 2006
  22. Taking Fedora Core 6 Test 2 for a Live-Spin - Aug 31, 2006
  23. PCLinuxOS 0.93a - The Full Monty - Aug 22, 2006
  24. Neowin.net's Shift Linux 0.2 - Aug 14, 2006
  25. Elive 0.5 Beta-3.1 - Aug 13, 2006
  26. openSUSE 10.2 Alpha 3 Report - Aug 12, 2006
  27. Discovering Linux - The Experiences of a Linux Newbie - Aug 9, 2006
  28. KateOS 3.0 Released & Tested - Aug 9, 2006
  29. PCLinuxOS 0.93a MiniMe - Aug 5, 2006/li>
  30. HOWTO: Installing Grsecurity patched kernel in debian/ubuntu - Aug 2, 2006
  31. Mandriva 2007 Beta 1 - Aug 1, 2006
  32. Berry Linux 0.72 - July 31, 2006
  33. SimplyMEPIS 6.0 - What Happened? - July 28, 2006
  34. Testdriving Freespire Beta2 (Build 0.0.76) - July 27, 2006
  35. Dreamlinux 2.0 XGL Edition - July 18, 2006
  36. Ladislav Bodnar - Keeper of the Record - July 17, 2006.
  37. SUSE Linux 10.2a2 report - July 15, 2006
  38. Kubuntu Clash: Should I stay or should I go? - Jul 13, 2006
  39. BlueWhite64 Linux pre-11.0-beta - July 8, 2006
  40. Xandros 4: Home Edition - Premium - July 1, 2006
  41. SUSE Linux Enterprise 10rc3 - June 28, 2006
  42. Mandriva 2007.0 alpha livecd - KDE version test - June 23, 2006
  43. SimplyMepis 6.0 rc1 - June 18, 2006
  44. The Break-Up: Not a good date movie - June 17, 2006
  45. SUSE 10.2 alpha 1 tested - June 15, 2006
  46. Feel the Freedom: KateOS 3.0a1 - June 14, 2006
  47. Cars - The Must-See Movie of the Summer? - June 14, 2006
  48. Google Earth on Linux - June 12, 2006
  49. The Omen (2006) - June 12, 2006
  50. A Linux User's Look at Vista Beta 2 - June 10, 2006
  51. Taking Puppy for a short walk - June 7, 2006
  52. Updating My Toolbox - Knoppix 5.0.1 - June 4, 2006
  53. Kubuntu 6.06 - June 2, 2006
  54. Ubuntu 6.06 LTS Final Look - June 1, 2006
  55. Hola Tuquito 2.0 Beta 3 - May 30, 2006
  56. Ubuntu 6.06 LTS Release Candidate - May 26, 2006
  57. Puppy Linux 1.0.9 CE - May 21, 2006
  58. Symphony OS 2006-05 Beta (act 5) - May 18, 2006
  59. Wizard's Kid-Safe Livecd - May 14, 2006
  60. SUSE Linux 10.1 Final Report - May 12, 2006
  61. Same Austrumi - Only Better - May 09, 2006
  62. Slax 5.1.4 - Your Pocket OS - May 08, 2006
  63. Personal Computing - BSD Style - May 02, 2006
  64. emerge -p litrix 6.0 - May 01, 2006
  65. SuSE Linux 10.1 RC3 Report - Apr. 29, 2006
  66. Wolvix Media Edition 1.0.4 - Apr. 28, 2006
  67. SneakPeak at Xawtv 4 - Apr. 25, 2006
  68. xfce4.4 beta 1 - Apr. 23, 2006
  69. SuSE Linux 10.1 RC2 Report - Apr. 23, 2006
  70. The PCLinuxOS 0.93 MiniME - Apr. 21, 2006
  71. Damn Small Linux - NOT - Apr. 20, 2006
  72. LG3D LiveCD 2.4 Test 1 - Apr. 20, 2006
  73. SUSE 10.1 RC1 from a Mdv/PCLOS User - Apr 17, 2006
  74. Suse 10.1 RC 1 Report - Apr. 14, 2006
  75. Mepuntu: Mepis 6.0 Alpha 1 - Apr. 11, 2006
  76. Get your game on with SuperGamer-1 - Apr. 8, 2006
  77. Kororaa XGL - Part 0.2: The Harddrive Installer - Apr. 7, 2006
  78. It's a liiiive - with XGL: Phaeronix .85 Beta 1 - Apr. 2, 2006
  79. SuSE 10.1 Beta 9 Report - Mar. 31, 2006
  80. Damn Small Linux 2.3: 50mb of Penguin Power - Mar. 29, 2006
  81. Taking MyahOS 2.0 for a little spin - Mar. 18, 2006
  82. SUSE 10.1 Beta 8 report - Mar. 17, 2006
  83. Introducing Kwort Linux - Mar. 12, 2006
  84. Kororaa XGL LiveCD - Mar. 09, 2006
  85. Yoper 3.0 Beta Tested - Mar. 07, 2006
  86. SUSE 10.1 Beta 6 Report - Mar. 05, 2006
  87. MandrivaOne - a livecd - Mar. 03, 2006
  88. Four Flat Tires: Accelerated Knoppix - Mar. 01, 2006
  89. SUSE 10.1 Beta 5 Report - Feb. 27, 2006
  90. Mandriva One - a livecd attempt - Feb. 25, 2006
  91. Meet Hedinux - Feb. 20, 2006
  92. SUSE 10.1 Beta 4 Report - Feb. 19, 2006
  93. Elive 0.4 - Feb. 18, 2006
  94. Testdriving Wolvix Media Edition 1.0.4 Beta 2 - Feb. 17, 2006
  95. DreamLinux 1.0 Studio Edition - Feb. 13, 2006
  96. A New Breed of Puppy: Grafpup Linux 1.0.2 - Feb. 13, 2006
  97. GoblinX Premium 2006.1 Tested - Feb. 11, 2006
  98. rr4 linux 3.0b0 - Feb. 07, 2006
  99. Opera 9p2 Mini Tour - Feb. 07, 2006
  100. SUSE 10.1 beta 3 Report - Feb. 03, 2006
  101. Ultima Linux: Third Time's a Charm? - Jan. 29, 2006
  102. Solving Rubix Linux 1.0 RC2 - Jan. 25, 2006
  103. KDE 3.5.1: Just Around the Bend - Jan. 23, 2006
  104. SuSE 10.1 Beta 1 Report - Jan. 21, 2006
  105. VLOS 1.2.1 Tested - Jan. 20, 2006
  106. Little looksee at sam-2006-1-preview - Jan. 19, 2006
  107. A glimpse at SimplyMEPIS_3.4-3.rc1 - Jan. 15, 2006
  108. UltimaLinux LiveCD - Jan. 14, 2006
  109. Stx Linux 1.0 Final Look - Jan. 10, 2006
  110. What's all the FUSS? - Jan. 8, 2006
  111. When Choice Matters: VectorLinux SOHO 5.1 rc2 - Jan. 07, 2006
  112. Ubuntu Meets Gentoo: Ututo Linux - Jan. 02, 2006










More in Tux Machines

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.

Red Hat News

Linux Kernel Space: eBPF and More (LWN Paywall Expired)

  • A thorough introduction to eBPF
    In his linux.conf.au 2017 talk [YouTube] on the eBPF in-kernel virtual machine, Brendan Gregg proclaimed that "super powers have finally come to Linux". Getting eBPF to that point has been a long road of evolution and design. While eBPF was originally used for network packet filtering, it turns out that running user-space code inside a sanity-checking virtual machine is a powerful tool for kernel developers and production engineers. Over time, new eBPF users have appeared to take advantage of its performance and convenience. This article explains how eBPF evolved how it works, and how it is used in the kernel.
  • Restricting automatic kernel-module loading
    The kernel's module mechanism allows the building of a kernel with a wide range of hardware and software support without requiring that all of that code actually be loaded into any given running system. The availability of all of those modules in a typical distributor kernel means that a lot of features are available — but also, potentially, a lot of exploitable bugs. There have been numerous cases where the kernel's automatic module loader has been used to bring buggy code into a running system. An attempt to reduce the kernel's exposure to buggy modules shows how difficult some kinds of hardening work can be.
  • Container IDs for the audit subsystem
    Linux containers are something of an amorphous beast, at least with respect to the kernel. There are lots of facilities that the kernel provides (namespaces, control groups, seccomp, and so on) that can be composed by user-space tools into containers of various shapes and colors; the kernel is blissfully unaware of how user space views that composition. But there is interest in having the kernel be more aware of containers and for it to be able to distinguish what user space considers to be a single container. One particular use case for the kernel managing container identifiers is the audit subsystem, which needs unforgeable IDs for containers that can be associated with audit trails. Back in early October, Richard Guy Briggs posted the second version of his RFC for kernel container IDs that can be used by the audit subsystem. The first version was posted in mid-September, but is not the only proposal out there. David Howells proposed turning containers into full-fledged kernel objects back in May, but seemingly ran aground on objections that the proposal "muddies the waters and makes things more brittle", in the words of namespaces maintainer Eric W. Biederman.

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