Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

How much power does KDE need?

Filed under
KDE

Honestly, I just love hacking while traveling by train - no IRC, no ICQ, no email that steals attention. However, most of the time I don't sit near a power supply socket so my laptop runs from battery. How much do you need for running KDE? I don't mean CPU or RAM ressources, but battery power. I know that you can enhance the battery lifetime by installing more RAM into your laptop - so that the hard disk has less work to do. But how much could you save by not running KDE ?

And I had time to figure out. I've fixed busy-looping in KDE-applications already in the past, but it seems there are new offenders added to our tree on a daily basis. Even if those busy-looping applications (with short timeouts) never appear as significant in the top output - they eat processing time.. and power. For my laptop, running KDE (not doing any user interaction) requires about 1.2 W/h. Thats 10%. With other words, I could hack about 10% longer if those are fixed. Thats a lot, so I started stracing to find the worst offenders. And the hitlist is:

  • artsd. No further comment necessary, its the first thing I kill (or don't even install) anyway.

  • kded (with dnotify it seems to busy-loop due to debug-output<->directory changed trigger loop)
  • klaptopdaemon. The code just does horrible stuff, including installing event listeners everywhere for no reason. Second thing to kill if you actually use a laptop.
  • kicker. One reason is the clock, which busy-loops even if nothing is to be expected to be done. But its doing a lot more, I haven't quite figured out yet what it does, but its definitely unnecessary as long as there is no user interaction.

Over the next few weeks I might try fixing those worst offenders. Any help with that is highly appreciated.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Canonical Patches Four Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu 15.04 and Ubuntu 14.04

Today, July 28, Canonical published details about new Linux kernel updates for its Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating systems, urging users to update the installations as soon as possible. Read more

Ubuntu Software Center Is Really Hated by the Community, but Why?

Ubuntu MATE recently decided to drop the Ubuntu Software Center and it will not longer be available with the upcoming 15.10 Alpha 2 release. This is interesting in itself, but this editorial is about another aspect. From the looks of it, a very large part of the Ubuntu and Linux community really hates the Ubuntu Software Center. Read more

Wine Announcement

The Wine development release 1.7.48 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - Fleshed out OpenMP implementation. - I/O stream support in the MSVCIRT C++ runtime. - Support for pixel snapping in DirectWrite. - More support for OpenGL core contexts. - Various bug fixes. Read more

Canonical Closes QEMU Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu 15.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Three QEMU vulnerabilities have been found and corrected in Ubuntu 15.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS operating systems by Canonical. Read more