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Leftovers: Devices, Mozilla and Distros

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  • Mythic Beasts, miniNodes Offer Raspberry Pi 4 Hosting Services

    Mythic Beats is the company offering hosting services for the Raspberry Pi website, and following Eben Upton proposal they decided to host the website on eighteen Raspberry Pi 4 boards, fourteen of which used as LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) servers, as well as two used as static servers with Apache, and the final two used as memory store using memcache.

    Two days before Raspberry Pi 4 8GB RAM launch, they tested the implementation with “normal” traffic (e.g. around one million visitors a day), and the day of the launch, tens of millions visitors came to the website, and it failed, but not because of a failure of the Raspberry Pi cluster, but instead due to a Cloudflare glitch. This is all explained in Raspberry Pi blog.

  • Live Stream: A web site on your phone with Site.js

    A sneak peek at hosting a web site on a PinePhone using Site.js 14.2.0 Alpha.

  • Igalia's contribution to the Mozilla project and Open Prioritization

    As many web platform developer and Firefox users, I believe Mozilla’s mission is instrumental for a better Internet. In a recent Igalia’s chat about the Web Ecosystem Health, participants made the usual observation regarding this important role played by Mozilla on the one hand and the limited development resources and small Firefox’s usage share on the other hand. In this blog post, I’d like to explain an experimental idea we are launching at Igalia to try and make browser development better match the interest of the web developer and user community.

  • Sustainability needs culture change. Introducing Environmental Champions.

    Sustainability is not just about ticking a few boxes by getting your Greenhouse Gas emissions (GHG) inventory, adopting goals for reduction and mitigation, and accounting in shape. Any transformation towards sustainability also needs culture change.

    In launching Mozilla‘s Sustainability Programme, our Environmental Champions are a key part of driving this organisational culture change.

    Recruiting, training, and working with a first cohort of Environmental Champions has been a highlight of my job in the last couple of months. I can’t wait to see their initiatives taking root across all parts of Mozilla.

    We have 14 passionate and driven individuals in this first cohort. They are critical amplifiers who will nudge each and every one us to incorporate sustainability into everything we do.

    [...]

    Daria, Head of Product Design in Emerging Technologies, says: “There are many opportunities for designers to develop responsible technologies and to bring experiences that prioritize sustainability principles. It’s time we unlocked them.” She is planning to develop and apply a Sustainability Impact Assessment Tool that will be used in decision-making around product design and development.

    We’ll also be looking at Firefox performance and web power usage, starting with explorations for how to better measure the impact of our products. DOM engineer, Olli will be stewarding these.

    And the behind the scenes editorial support thinking through content, timing, and outreach? That’s Daniel for you.

    We’ll be sharing more initiatives and the progress they are all making as we move forward. In the meantime, do join us on our Matrix channel to continue the conversation.

  • Haiku Repository Files and Identifiers

    Software on a computing platform such as Haiku is typically distributed as a package. Without a packaging system it would be hard for users to install software and because software often depends on other software, the chain of dependencies would be difficult for a user to resolve themselves. To orchestrate the distribution and management of the packages, Haiku has a packaging system which consists of applications, online tools, on-host tools and software libraries. One aspect of the packaging system is the coordination and identification of repositories.

  • IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR ALL "PUPPY" LINUX USERS : the end of an era....

    This is going to come as something of a shock to most of you, I'm afraid. Some of you may even know this already from the Puppy Linux Users Group page on Facebook.

    It is with great sadness that I have to report the passing, on the 22nd May this year, of the revered host of the Murga-Linux Puppy Linux Discussion Forum....John de Murga. The man who hosted, and paid for the Murga-Linux Forum out of his own pocket for nearly 16 years, and without whom the current Puppy Linux membership wouldn't have become what it is today.

    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXNd0sLYPDRBTa8eMW9CTQO266wfVKCssSWkPB0UAY9KoSXA/viewform

    JM spent many years as an analyst/programmer in the banking sector, and was single-handedly responsible for some of the sector's cornerstone software which is still in use today.

    It's unclear at this point in time whether John's passing was directly related to Covid-19 or to other, unrelated causes. Hopefully, further details will emerge in due course.

    As of yesterday afternoon, the Murga-Linux forum, without warning, went into automatic "maintenance mode".....and since there's no-one around to fix it any longer, we witness the passing of an era, in addition to the loss of an awful lot of useful information.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel 5.8 “The Biggest Release of All Time” is Finally Available Now

Linus Torvalds has called it “the biggest release of all time”. Check out what are the key changes in the recently released Linux Kernel 5.8. Read more

Android Leftovers

Programming: Python, Perl, and GNOME/GTK

           
  • Why proactively clean Python 2 up?

    It seems a recurring complaint that we’re too aggressive on cleaning Python 2 up from packages. Why remove it if (package’s) upstream still supports py2? Why remove it when it still works? Why remove it when somebody’s ready to put some work to keep it working? I’m pretty sure that you’re aware that Python 2 has finally reached its end-of-life. It’s past its last release, and the current version is most likely vulnerable. We know we can’t remove it entirely just yet (but the clock is ticking!), so why remove its support here and there instead of keeping it some more? This is best explained on the example of dev-python/twisted — but dev-python/pillow is also quite similar. Twisted upstream removed support for Python 2 at version 20. This means that we ended up having to keep two versions of Twisted — 19 that still supports Python 2, and 20 that does not. What does that means for our users? Firstly, they can’t normally upgrade Twisted if at least one of its reverse dependencies supports Python 2 and is installed. What’s important is that the user does not have to meaningfully need or use Python 2 in that reverse dependency. It is entirely sufficient that it supports Python 2 and the user is using default PYTHON_TARGETS. Of course, you could argue that changing the default PYTHON_TARGETS would resolve the problem without having to proactively remove Python 2 from Twisted revdeps. Today, I’m not sure which of the two options is better. However, back when cleanup started changing default PT would involve a lot of pain for the users. We’d have to reenable 2.7 via package.use for many packages (but which ones?) or the users would have to reenable it themselves. But that’s really tangential now.

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  • Python Bytes: #192 Calculations by hand, but in the compter, with Handcalcs

    Idea by Guido van Rossum to bring back the print statement.

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  • PyDev 7.7.0 released (mypy integration improvements, namespace packages)

    This release brings multiple improvements for dealing with type hints as well as improvements in the Mypy integration in PyDev: The MYPYPATH can now be set automatically to the source folders set on PyDev and the --follow-imports flag is set to silent by default (this flag is required because only one file is analyzed at a time in PyDev as failing to do so would end up showing errors for other files).

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  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #10
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In: Week 10
  • Perl Weekly Challenge 71: Peak Elements and Trim Linked List
  • The Perl Weekly Challenge #071

    With another Linked List related task, I am now enjoying it a lot. It also gives me the opportunity to work with Class in Raku. Learning Raku has changed my thinking a big way. The developer inside me is more organised than before. Also doing regular weekly challenge made me think from unit test point of view every time I come up with a solution. In fact, it dictates the design of my solution. Now with the regular Live Video Raku Reviews by Andrew Shitov gave me the insights of others Raku solutions. It is amazing how he break the code into pieces to make it easy to understand. No book can teach you that. You only learn from experience or watching video from Andrew Shitov. Running [The|Perl] Weekly Challenge also taught me how to manage my spare time. I use my spare time very carefully. Before I would jump to anything that excites me. Last few weeks, I have started playing with Swift programming language. I am enjoying the journey. Please checkout my Swift solution to the Task #1 of Peak Elements.

  • Mariana Pícolo: The Second milestone

    By discussing with my mentor how could the best approach be, I found out that the notifications were already grouped on the code level, but these groups were not being represented in the UI. In the code, there's a class named Source, which is responsible for the group. They handle the info's about the app that have sent us any notification and store them. There's also a class named Notification, that creates a single notification, with title, banner, and has optional parameters such as playing sounds etc. Each Source has an array property that contains its notification objects, which gives us the groups. [...] Lastly, I'd like to talk about GUADEC which this year was completely remote. This was my first talk at a conference, in a language that I'm not a native speaker. I want to thank my mentor and the GNOME community for creating a comfortable environment for the interns to talk about their projects.

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