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Games: Vagrus - The Riven Realms, CARRION, Cloud Miners

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  • Narrative-heavy RPG 'Vagrus - The Riven Realms' has a free Prologue out now

    Vagrus - The Riven Realms, an upcoming turn-based narrative exploration RPG now has a Prologue available to get a feel for if it might be your thing.

    It has a strong emphasis on the narrative side of it, with a fair amount of reading being needed while you explore and travel across a dark fantasy world as the leader of a caravan. This is a world that was absolutely annihilated by the gods, who didn't like what they saw, and now unspeakable horrors roam the lands. This Prologue contains the beginning sections of the game - both from the more narrative-driven introductory part and from the open-world main campaign.

  • CARRION brings on the grisly reverse-horror on July 23

    Phobia Game Studio and Devolver Digital recently announced that CARRION, a reverse-horror where you're the thing lurking in the dark will release on July 23.

    I couldn't be any more excited about this, seriously I'm so hyped about it after playing through the demo three times because it's just so brilliantly designed. You are an amorphous creature of unknown origins, stalking and consuming those that imprisoned you.

  • Cloud Miners is an upcoming 2D co-op space mining and exploration game

    Inspired by Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime, the upcoming Cloud Miners looks like it could be a fun blend of genres to play in some local co-op sessions.

    "You and your shipmates have been attacked and your ship destroyed! A Cloud Corp ship was nearby and able to save the crew at the last minute, and now you are indebted to Cloud Corp. In order to buy a new ship, and your freedom back, you must toil away mining asteroids and planets of their valuable resources, running on suspicious missions for Cloud Corp and entertaining spectators in the C.L.A.A.S.H. Coliseum battle arena. Your lives now belong to Cloud Corp, and it's up to you to take your power back!"

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

PCLinuxOS: Interview, systemd, Meemaw and Screenshot Showcase

  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: pyjujiop

    I am a professional journalist who has been in the profession since 1993. At the current time I am a freelancer working for media relations firms and open to new clients! My main client is operated by an old colleague of mine, who is hoping to bring me on full-time. [...] I have two computers presently running PCLinuxOS as their primary OS. One is a Dell Inspiron 1545 laptop that has been completely overhauled; it now runs a 3.06 GHz T9900 CPU, 6 GB of RAM, and has both a 256GB SSD and a 640GB HDD installed. The other is a desktop with an Athlon X4 870K CPU at 3.9 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM and several HDDs and SSDs installed in the case. We have two other Windows machines and an Amazon tablet that Kay uses. [...] Honestly, I have no complaints about it. I would like PCLinuxOS to gain more users, but only because it would hopefully get more people to donate. I have no idea how Tex and the community manage to keep it as well maintained as they do. I returned to PCLinuxOS because I preferred the community-based model and the philosophy of this distro over using anything related to Ubuntu.

  • Mind Your Step: Miscellaneous Topics

    I have seen what could be accomplished with certain other distributions. The addition of support for FlatPak and AppImage applications is a great start towards the future of the distribution. I know we all hate systemd, so I won't even suggest the inclusion of this monstrosity. The original intention of systemd was to simplify the system initialization functions found in SysV INIT scripts as well as the scripts contained in the /etc/rc/rc.d directory into one system controlled by one daemon. Those of us who have worked with Mac OS-X or Windows in the past know what a PITA it is to maintain these operating systems and their startup routines. After having looked at systemd and its documentation, I do not see any reason why we should ever implement such a thing here!!!!!! But, what if there was another solution. MX-Linux (formerly MEPIS) has a solution in the form of the systemd API replacement package. Such a package would not be easy to implement, and if anyone had the time to do it, it could be done. But then, if Flatpak can be implemented without systemd, then is there really any reason why technologies such as Docker, Kubernetes, or even QEMU could be implemented without systemd? (BTW, I got QEMU 5.0 to compile on PCLinuxOS with all emulated processors enabled. It took three hours on my laptop, but it got the job done. I have yet to test it, though.) Another possibility is to create an ISO with the basics (including the base X.org installation), but without the graphical interface launching at startup. This would be useful for server installations, for low-spec machines, and for those of you who have trouble getting the graphical interface to work at all..

  • From The Chief Editor's Desk

    What we commonly call and hold dear as Linux almost had a different name. Torvalds briefly considered "Linux," a play on his first name and Unix, but considered it too egotistical. So, he changed the name to "Freax," combining the words "free," "freak," and "Unix." However, Ari Lemmke, one of the volunteer administrators of the FTP server at the Helsinki University of Technology at the time, thought "Freax" was a dumb name, and took it upon himself to rename it Linux. The name stuck. Tux, the Linux mascot, didn't come about until five years later. In 1996, when they were about to select the mascot, Torvalds mentioned he was bitten by a little penguin (Eudyptula minor) on a visit to the National Zoo & Aquarium in Canberra, Australia. Larry Ewing provided the original draft of today's well known mascot based on this description. The name Tux was suggested by James Hughes as derivative of Torvalds' UniX, along with being short for tuxedo, a type of suit with color similar to that of a penguin. ******************** This month's magazine cover was designed by Meemaw. It celebrates the 29th anniversary of the Linux announcement, the announcement of the IBM PC on August 12, 1981, and August being Watermelon Month. During the dog days of summer, there's little else as refreshing as some ice cold watermelon to cool us off. Until next month, I bid you peace, happiness, prosperity, serenity, and continued good health!

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase

Introducing Inkscape 1.0

Smoother performance, HiDPI support, new & improved Live Path Effects & native macOS app After a little over three years in development, the team is excited to launch the long awaited Inkscape 1.0 into the world. Built with the power of a team of volunteers, this open source vector editor represents the work of many hearts and hands from around the world, ensuring that Inkscape remains available free for everyone to download and enjoy. In fact, translations for over 20 languages were updated for version 1.0, making the software more accessible to people from all over the world. A major milestone was achieved in enabling Inkscape to use a more recent version of the software used to build the editor's user interface (namely GTK+3). Users with HiDPI (high resolution) screens can thank teamwork that took place during the 2018 Boston Hackfest for setting the updated-GTK wheels in motion. Read more Also: Inkscape Tutorial: Inkscape 1.0 New Features

Android Leftovers