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Graphics: Intel Gen12, Navy Flounder, Sway and DRM-Next

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Hardware
  • Intel Gen12 Graphics Bring EU Fusion - EUs Fused In Pairs

    While we remain eager to find out more about (and benchmark) Intel Gen12 graphics in Tiger Lake and Xe discrete graphics with this generation bringing the biggest changes to the ISA since i965, Linux patches and bug reports do continue offering new tid-bits of information on Gen12.

    One bit that I don't believe has been reported publicly or at least not widely is that starting with Intel Gen12 graphics there is "EU Fusion" or the execution units now being paired for yielding a larger warp size.

  • "Navy Flounder" Is The Newest AMD Navi 2 GPU Being Added To The Linux Driver

    In addition to the "Sienna Cichlid" support recently published for the open-source AMD Radeon Linux kernel graphics driver, there is another new graphics processor being added to their driver: Navy Flounder.

    Sent out this week were patches for Navy Flounder as another Navi 2 part, Navi 22 to be exact. The patches mostly reuse the existing Sienna Cichlid code paths. The codename, like Sienna Cichlid, is the Linux naming convention currently being used by the AMD Linux team of a color followed by a fish species.

  • Sway 1.5 Wayland Compositor Released With Adaptive-Sync/VRR, New Protocols

    Sway 1.5 is out as a big feature update to this Wayland compositor inspired by the i3 window manager. A big user-facing feature with Sway 1.5 is support for Adaptive Synchronization / Variable Refresh Rate, such as AMD FreeSync.

    Up to now the FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync has been principally been in place for the Linux desktop when running on an X.Org session. However, Sway now supports Adaptive-Sync/VRR for reducing stuttering and tearing within games.

  • Early Intel DG1 Graphics Card Enablement Sent In To DRM-Next For Linux 5.9

    As we have been anticipating for weeks, initial (but still early) enablement of the Intel DG1 graphics card on their open-source driver stack will indeed be sent in for the upcoming Linux 5.9 cycle and is currently being queued in the DRM-Next repository.

    It was in late May that Intel sent out the DG1 patches to light up the graphics card on Linux and building off all the existing Gen12/Xe graphics code already mainlined within the kernel. Since then the kernel work has continued with other features getting squared away.

AMD Navi 22 is listed in a Linux patch under the fuzzy....

  • AMD Navi 22 is listed in a Linux patch under the fuzzy name “Navy Flounder”

    Some time ago there was a rumor that AMD had discovered that users were snooping around in their controllers to find clues about new products coming to market. There were rumors that AMD started using alternative code names to hide its graphics cards from prying eyes. Sienna Cichlid, who is believed to be Navi 21, was the first example that came to light. And now AMD seems to use the code name Navy Flounder to hide the silicon Navi 22.

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Graphics: AMD, Intel and Wayland/Wayfire

  • Defaulting Radeon GCN 1.0/1.1 GPUs To Better Linux Driver Is Held Up By Analog Outputs

    Switching from the "Radeon" to "AMDGPU" kernel driver on Linux is possible for Radeon GCN 1.0/1.1 era graphics cards and doing so can mean slight performance benefits, the ability to run the AMDVLK or RADV Vulkan drivers, and simply making use of this better maintained driver. But having these original GCN graphics cards default to the modern AMDGPU driver appears held up by the lack of analog video output support with that driver.

  • Intel's Open-Source H.265/HEVC Encoder Sees First Release Of 2020

    Intel's Scalable Video Technology team is known for their open-source video encoder work particularly on AV1 and VP9 formats, but they also continue to maintain a high performance H.265/HEVC encoder as well. Intel SVT-HEVC 1.5 was released on Monday as their first major update of the year. Intel SVT-HEVC 1.5 fixes "all memory leaks" following a refactoring of their allocation/deallocation code that also leads to the ability for FFmpeg to run multi-instance encoding in parallel. SVT-HEVC 1.5 also has a number of optimizations, fixes for a random hang issue with few threads (something we've seen as well with SVT-HEVC in our own benchmarks), and a number of other fixes.

  • GNOME's Mutter Adds Support For Launching "Trusted Clients" On Wayland

    Merged to GNOME's Mutter compositor is an API for Wayland to allow the launching of trusted clients. This "trusted clients" support is namely about allowing child windows to be signified as being from a parent window/process. This can also allow for some nifty use-cases for GNOME on Wayland. The patch explains: Unfortunately, although the child process can be a graphical program, currently it is not possible for the inner code to identify the windows created by the child in a secure manner (this is: being able to ensure that a malicious program won't be able to trick the inner code into thinking it is a child process launched by it).

  • Wayfire 0.5 Wayland Compositor Brings Latency Optimizations, More Protocols

    Wayfire, a Wayland compositor inspired by the likes of Compiz with different desktop effects, is out today with a new feature release. Perhaps most exciting with Wayfire 0.5 is the work done to improve (reduce) the latency. Wayfire now better tracks how much time it needs to draw a frame, support for the presentation time protocol, and other work. Aside from latency improvements, there are Wayland protocol additions for primary selection for allowing middle-click-paste to work plus the output-power-management protocol for better handling display output power management behavior.

How Librem 5 Solves NSA’s Warning About Cellphone Location Data

The NSA has published new warnings for military and intelligence personnel about the threats from location data that is captured constantly on modern cellphones (originally reported by the Wall Street Journal). While privacy advocates (including us at Purism) have long warned about these risks, having the NSA publish an official document on the subject helps demonstrate that cellphone tracking is a real privacy and security problem for everyone. We have been thinking about the danger of location data on cellphones for a long time at Purism and have designed the Librem 5 from scratch specifically to address this risk. The NSA document describes and confirms a number of the threats I wrote about almost a year and a half ago when I introduced our “lockdown mode” feature on the Librem 5–a feature that disables all sensors on the Librem 5. In this post I’ll describe the threats the NSA presents in their document and how we address them with the Librem 5. Read more Also: Librem 5 Web Apps

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