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today's programming leftovers and licence lawsuit

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  • Whiteboard Coding Stress Reduces Performance by More than Half

    A recent study by North Carolina State University researchers found that stress caused by whiteboard technical interviews significantly affected the performance of job candidates.

    Whiteboard tests are a common feature of the hiring process for software developers. During these sessions, candidates are expected to develop coding solutions on a whiteboard while describing their decision-making process to observers.

    In the study, half of the participants performed the typical whiteboard test with an interviewer looking on. The other half solved the problem on a whiteboard in a private room with no interviewer present. The private interviews also included a retrospective “think-aloud” session to discuss the solutions presented.

    [...]

    In the paper, the researchers noted that “a technical interview has an uncanny resemblance to the Trier social stress test,” a technique used by psychologists with the sole purpose of inducing stress. “Through a happy accident, the software industry has seemingly reinvented a crude yet effective instrument for reliably introducing stress in subjects, which typically manifests as performance anxiety,” they said. Additionally, “the unique combination of cognitive-demanding tasks with a social-evaluative threat (essentially being watched) is consistent and powerful,” they stated.

  • Address Sanitizer, Part 1

    Hello everyone. My name is Harshit Sharma (hst on IRC). I am working on the project to add the “Address Sanitizer” feature to coreboot as a part of GSoC 2020. Werner Zeh is my mentor for this project and I’d like to thank him for his constant support and valuable suggestions.

    It’s been a fun couple of weeks since I started working on this project. Though I found the initial few weeks quite challenging, I am glad that I was able to go past that and learned some amazing stuff I’d cherish for a long time.

    Also, being a student, I find it incredible to have got a chance to work with and learn from such passionate, knowledgeable, and helpful people who are always available over IRC to assist.

    [...]

    The design of ASan in coreboot is based on its implementation in Linux kernel, also known as Kernel Address Sanitizer (KASAN). However, coreboot differs a lot from Linux kernel due to multiple stages and that is what poses a challenge.

  • Etcd, or, why modern software makes me sad

    I talk a lot of shit about Google, but Facebook and Microsoft are nearly as bad at turning out legions of ex-employees who can't be left alone in the room with a keyboard lest they attempt to recreate their previous employer's technology stack, poorly.

  • EuroPython 2020: Find a new job at the conference

    Our sponsors would love to get in touch with you, so please have a look and visit them at their sponsor exhibit channel on Discord or contact them via the links and email addresses given on the page.

  • Check if incoming edges in a vertex of directed graph is equal to vertex itself or not

    Given a directed Graph G(V, E) with V vertices and E edges, the task is to check that for all vertices of the given graph, the incoming edges in a vertex is equal to the vertex itself or not.

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  • Jelurida Files Lawsuit Against Apollo Blockchain For License Violations Over Nxt Code

More in Tux Machines

Kernel: Linux 5.9 Features and Linux Plumbers Releasing More Passes

  • Intel Adds Capability To Linux 5.9 For NVDIMM Firmware Updates Without Reboots

    For Intel NVDIMMs like DC Persistent Memory there is support on the way with Linux 5.9 to support firmware updates to the non-volatile memory device without the need for a system reboot.  The LIBNVDIMM changes for Linux 5.9 include "Runtime Firmware Activation" as the Intel-devised feature for accommodating device firmware updates to supported NVDIMM modules without needing a reboot. The intent is on being less disruptive than a reboot and allow loading the firmware still via the ndctl user-space utility and then the new ability to "activate" the new firmware. 

  • F2FS With Linux 5.9 Adds Secure TRIM, New Garbage Collection Option

    The Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) changes have been sent in for the in-development Linux 5.9 kernel.  The prominent changes this cycle include a new garbage collection mode (GC_URGENT_LOW) and a "secure" TRIM option (F2FS_IOC_SEC_TRIM_FILE) in the name of security.  The F2FS_IOC_SEC_TRIM_FILE functionality is intended as secure erase functionality. For drives not supporting TRIM/DISCARD, zeroing out the given data range for the regular file is performed to ensure the data is wiped on disk. 

  • Linux 5.9 Bringing Mellanox VDPA Driver For Newer ConnectX Devices

    There are a few changes worth mentioning out of the VirtIO updates submitted today for the Linux 5.9 kernel.  The latest Mellanox driver going mainline in the Linux kernel is a VDPA (Virtual Data Path Acceleration) for their ConnectX6 DX and newer devices.  The VDPA standard is an abstraction layer on top of SR-IOV and allows for a single VirtIO driver in the guest that isn't hardware specific while still allowing wire-speed performance on the data plane. VDPA is more versatile than the likes of VirtIO full hardware offloading. More details for those interested via this Red Hat post. 

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  • Linux Plumbers Releasing More Passes

    After a careful review we have decided to release more passes. We are thrilled with the interest for this first ever online Linux Plumbers. The highlight of Linux Plumbers is the microconferences which are heavily focused on discussion and problem solving. To give the best experience for discussion, we have chosen to use an open source virtual platform that offers video for all participants. The platform recommends not having more than a certain number of people in each room at a time, hence putting a cap on registration to avoid hitting that limit. We do have solutions that will hopefully allow as many people as possible to experience Plumbers. We appreciate your patience and enthusiasm.

Python Programming Leftovers

  • The best frontend JavaScript framework for Django

    A question I've seen asked a lot is "what's the best frontend JavaScript framework to use with Django". Django itself doesn't make any recommendation on which frontend framework to use, or even assumes you're using a frontend framework at all. So, which frontend framework should you be using? And which one "plays well" with Django?

  • Ned Batchelder: You should include your tests in coverage

    This seems to be a recurring debate: should you measure the coverage of your tests? In my opinion, definitely yes. Just to clarify: I’m not talking about using coverage measurement with your test suite to see what parts of your product are covered. I’ll assume we’re all doing that. The question here is, do you measure how much of your tests themselves are executed? You should.

  • Is Java and Python similar?

    I don't think python and Java have anything in common. I enjoy the simple clean utilitarian nature of python. As long as simple pep8 guidelines are followed it is very easy to read any strangers code. Most people write python in an OO sort of way. However one can get pretty far in writing with an FP lite methodology. Many people complain about indents. To me it is just different and something easy to get used to. Python has idioms that values being clean and concise. It is trivial to deploy. My main critique of python is that if one uses too much python it is easy to get dumbed down by all the magic. It is important to use other languages in addition to python just to keep ones skills sharp. Thinking about writing high performing Python usually means thinking about doing it in some other language. [...] Note: I recognize Java is the most popular language in the world. Many great successfull applications use Java. One can eventually use Java to solve almost any problem. That doesn't mean I like it or think it is good for the industry.

  • Real Python: Identify Invalid Python Syntax

    Python is known for its simple syntax. However, when you’re learning Python for the first time or when you’ve come to Python with a solid background in another programming language, you may run into some things that Python doesn’t allow. If you’ve ever received a SyntaxError when trying to run your Python code, then this guide can help you. Throughout this course, you’ll see common examples of invalid syntax in Python and learn how to resolve the issue.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In #6 (2nd Aug - 9th Aug)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In #11
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 10 Check-in
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 10
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC: Week 11: InputEngine.add(paths)

Emacs 27.1 released

  • Emacs 27.1 released

    Version 27.1 of the Emacs editor is out. New features include support for arbitrary-sized integers, HarfBuzz support, improved drawing with Cairo, and the obligatory new JSON parser.

  • Don’t look, vi users: Emacs 27.1 waves bye to ImageMagick, adds native JSON parsing support

    The GNU project’s text editor Emacs is now available in version 27.1, which introduces native JSON parsing and tab bar support, allows basic image transformations without ImageMagick, and uses HarfBuzz, a tool also employed in GNOME, KDE, and Android, to make text look nice. Amongst other things, Emacs has learned to work with arbitrary-size integers, and graduated the option –with-cairo for building the editor with support for the drawing tool from its experimental state. Emacs now also uses the GNU Multiple Precision library GMP if not told otherwise, and replaces unexec with a portable dumper as the default. The latter is meant to improve compatibility with memory allocation on modern systems, which lets the tool work with techniques such as address space layout randomisation which is supposed to improve security.

Mozilla is laying off 250 people and planning a ‘new focus’ on making money

As part of the layoffs, Baker laid out a series of new focuses for Mozilla to set a stronger course for the company. That includes focuses on building community, building new products that “mitigate harms” and “that people love and want” to use, and crucially, to build out new revenue streams. Mozilla makes most of its money from companies paying to make their search engine the default in Firefox. This includes deals with Baidu in China, Yandex in Russia, and most notably, Google in the US and most of the rest of the world. The company also makes money from royalties, subscriptions, and advertising, but those search deals still represent the “majority” of its revenue. Baker says Mozilla will initially focus on products such as Pocket, its VPN service, its VR chatroom Hubs, and new “security and privacy” tools. The company started launching paid consumer services over the past year, offering a news subscription and access to a VPN from directly within Firefox. Firefox is also getting a stronger focus on user growth “through differentiated user experiences.” That means reducing investment in other areas, though, such as in building out developer tools. Mozilla has had a rough decade, as Firefox’s market share dwindled and attempts at bigger projects — like a Firefox phone running Firefox OS — fell apart. Baker seems to recognize that Mozilla needs to meet people where they are, building products that people want to use on the platforms they’re already using. She became CEO in April and was appointed interim CEO in December 2019; Baker has been the chair of the Mozilla Foundation since 2003. Read more