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Ubuntu's Migration Assistant

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Ubuntu

One of the areas with Feisty Fawn that I haven't yet covered on Phoronix, my blog, or the forums, is the new Ubuntu migration-assistant. This migration-assistant will be found in Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn and makes it easier to move your documents and settings over to Ubuntu from other operating systems. Switching Linux distributions can be a pain, but switching from Windows to Linux can be a disaster for most people. The Ubuntu migration-assistant hopes to lessen this impact by making the transfer of settings and files MUCH easier.

Ubuntu's migration-assistant is designed to help the user transport all of their documents/media and settings all over to a new Ubuntu installation. Among the areas being worked on for the migration-assistant is transporting instant messenger settings, bookmarks, address books, user accounts, e-mail messages, fonts, desktop backgrounds, and even Internet connection settings. For example, Windows' My Documents would automatically be transferred to say ~/Documents and music would be copied over and then set to be detected by Rhythmbox. If migration-assistant developers can really pull this off to the extent of passing Internet connection settings, this will be a miracle for new Linux users. In Feisty+1 they also hope to accomplish other advancements such as copying the backed up data over to external media and importing the transferred data to both KDE and GNOME.

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