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today's leftovers

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  • SiFive RISC-V Processors Get Performance & Efficiency Improvements, Smaller Footprint with 20G1 Release

    SiFive RISC-V cores portfolio ranges from low power 32-bit IoT processors to more powerful, Linux-capable 64-bi RISC-V cores like the latest SiFive U84/U87 cores rivaling with Arm Cortex-A7x cores.

    SiFive Core IP 20G1 release further enhances the company’s existing RISC-V cores with performance improvements, higher efficiency, and a smaller footprint.

  • Creating open data interfaces with ODPi

    Connecting one source of data to another isn't always easy because of different standards, data formats, and APIs to contend with, among the many challenges. One of the groups that is trying to help with the challenge of data interoperability is the Linux Foundation's Open Data Platform initiative (ODPi). At the 2020 Open Source Summit North America virtual event on July 2, ODPi Technical Steering Committee chairperson Mandy Chessell outlined the goals of ODPi and the projects that are part of it. She also described how ODPi is taking an open-source development approach to make data more easily accessible.

    While perhaps not as well-known as other Linux Foundation efforts, ODPi has actually been around since 2015. Chessell explained that ODPi's initial role was to help different vendors using Apache Hadoop to interoperate, since each had its own set of data connectors. As usage and the number of Hadoop vendors has declined in recent years, ODPi defined a broader vision to be an initiative focused on creating open-source data standards to help users understand and make use of data across different platforms.

    [...]

    While code is an important part of ODPi, technology alone isn't the only way to make effective use of data. Chessell noted that as organizations try to become more data-driven, they face cultural, organizational, and technology problems. "For many organizations they operate as a sort of hierarchy that creates silos between each of the different IT systems, and to make use of data you have to sort of break down those silos and allow data and collaboration to flow laterally across the organization," she said.

    The OpenDS4All project is one such non-code effort within ODPi. OpenDS4All is an open data-science project that is focused entirely on education, creating materials that educators and organizations can use to build a data-science curriculum. The project got started in February 2020 based on materials originally created by professors at the University of Pennsylvania.

  • Linux Foundation Newsletter: July 2020
  • How and why I (attempt to) use Links as main browser

    Many browsers today are gigantic resource hogs, which are basically VMs for various web applications. On the other hand, Links is a HTML browser. It is not able to do everything. It allows me to avoid most distractions and control the content-experience. The goal of this exercise is not to force anyone to use this browser, but just to be watchful and conscious of their hypertext based internet usage (one might use gopher, and this phlog is available there, but probability tells me that a person reading this reads this from hypertext source and I am sure they are lovely).

  • [Raspberry Pi] Super cool favourites picked by fabulous judges
  • Master the Raspberry Pi with this absolutely loaded $15 Humble book bundle

    Proceeds go to the Raspberry Pi Foundation, which is the non-profit that actually designs the world's favorite mini-PC and provides it at low cost. It's hard not to love this bundle if you're all about the Raspberry Pi.

  • Inside a Collaborative Text Editor

    Collaborative editors are defined by the size and speed of their updates. On a website you might submit a form, but in a collaborative editor you can send a single character or key press.

    Those tiny edits are shared quickly so you feel connected to your collaborators and can anticipate their actions. This experience is described as real-time editing.

    Inside your editor, however, the frequent edits form a hotbed of conflicting updates. Solving or avoiding these conflicts is the real challenge of a collaborative text editor.

  • Why you shouldn’t write your content in Uppercase, instead use CSS.

    First, a caveat, if something is meant to be uppercase, like an acronym, that is okay to write as uppercase, e.g CSS. If your text makes sense semantically in uppercase then it’s not a problem. (Note: HTML has an abbreviation element you should totally use)

    With that in mind, if your content is uppercased, only for design or styling purposes, then it should always be done with CSS. The way that you accomplish this is with the text-transform CSS property.

More in Tux Machines

Emacs 27.1 released

  • Emacs 27.1 released

    Version 27.1 of the Emacs editor is out. New features include support for arbitrary-sized integers, HarfBuzz support, improved drawing with Cairo, and the obligatory new JSON parser.

  • Don’t look, vi users: Emacs 27.1 waves bye to ImageMagick, adds native JSON parsing support

    The GNU project’s text editor Emacs is now available in version 27.1, which introduces native JSON parsing and tab bar support, allows basic image transformations without ImageMagick, and uses HarfBuzz, a tool also employed in GNOME, KDE, and Android, to make text look nice. Amongst other things, Emacs has learned to work with arbitrary-size integers, and graduated the option –with-cairo for building the editor with support for the drawing tool from its experimental state. Emacs now also uses the GNU Multiple Precision library GMP if not told otherwise, and replaces unexec with a portable dumper as the default. The latter is meant to improve compatibility with memory allocation on modern systems, which lets the tool work with techniques such as address space layout randomisation which is supposed to improve security.

Mozilla is laying off 250 people and planning a ‘new focus’ on making money

As part of the layoffs, Baker laid out a series of new focuses for Mozilla to set a stronger course for the company. That includes focuses on building community, building new products that “mitigate harms” and “that people love and want” to use, and crucially, to build out new revenue streams. Mozilla makes most of its money from companies paying to make their search engine the default in Firefox. This includes deals with Baidu in China, Yandex in Russia, and most notably, Google in the US and most of the rest of the world. The company also makes money from royalties, subscriptions, and advertising, but those search deals still represent the “majority” of its revenue. Baker says Mozilla will initially focus on products such as Pocket, its VPN service, its VR chatroom Hubs, and new “security and privacy” tools. The company started launching paid consumer services over the past year, offering a news subscription and access to a VPN from directly within Firefox. Firefox is also getting a stronger focus on user growth “through differentiated user experiences.” That means reducing investment in other areas, though, such as in building out developer tools. Mozilla has had a rough decade, as Firefox’s market share dwindled and attempts at bigger projects — like a Firefox phone running Firefox OS — fell apart. Baker seems to recognize that Mozilla needs to meet people where they are, building products that people want to use on the platforms they’re already using. She became CEO in April and was appointed interim CEO in December 2019; Baker has been the chair of the Mozilla Foundation since 2003. Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.8.1, 5.7.15, 5.4.58, and 4.19.139

  • Linux 5.8.1
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.8.1 kernel. All users of the 5.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.8.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.8.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.7.15
  • Linux 5.4.58
  • Linux 4.19.139

Games: Drink More Glurp, RimWorld, Jumpala and More

  • Party game 'Drink More Glurp' is an absolute barrel of laughs - out now

    Drink More Glurp, a party game that thoroughly parodies sporting events like the Olympic Games and also pokes fun at sponsorship systems is out now. Note: key provided by the developer. Set on an alien world where the inhabitants attempted to copy our sporty games, however they got everything just a little bit wrong which has resulted in a serious of ridiculous contests with completely mental physics. This might be the funniest party game I've played all year. After trying the original demo during the Steam Game Festival, I was hooked.

  • AntiMicro | Map Keyboard and Mouse Controls to Gamepad on openSUSE

    Installed a game called Pokemon Insurgence on Lutris and there was no way to play the game with a gamepad. Rather than try to fight things, set out for an application that would map the keyboard controls to the WiiU Pro Controller that has become my gamepad of choice. I know I heard it was possible on a podcast some time ago and since I was probably doing something else and didn’t have a notebook handy to write down whatever it was, I began my search and found this AntiMicro as a solution.

  • Vibrant twin-stick slasher 'Breakpoint' gives you exploding weapons

    Enjoy some classic fast-paced vibrant arcade-style action? Breakpoint looks like it's worthy of some attention for putting a nice unique spin on it. With bright neon graphics, they mixed in elements from the classic arcade games with "modern sensibilities". It's a top-down highscore chaser with melee weapons that…explode? Yes. No ranged attacks, no laser weapons, no pew-pew-pew. Instead you slice, crush, and blast your way through the swarm and when you push your weapons to their breaking point (it's called Breakpoint—get it?), they unleash a big explosion.

  • Steelbreakers turns the feel of classic Zelda into local multiplayer action

    The developer mentioned their idea with it was to make a game they wanted to play that they felt didn't exist already. As they said they "always wanted to play a Zelda game that demanded technical skill and would let you fight with your friends on a top-down 2d playing field" and so Steelbreakers was created. Together up to four players can fight for dominance in small arenas with traps and all sorts. At release, the developer is planning to have online play, additional game modes, plenty of maps and weapons, AI enemies and the list goes on. The demo is just a small slice of what to expect.

  • RimWorld gets a big 1.2 update out with lots more options to tweak your game

    The brilliant colony-building sim RimWorld has another mega post-release update available now, with content included for both the base game and the Royalty expansion. Looking over the changelog, which is as long as expected, it sounds excellent. RimWorld has gained a whole new way to tweak your experience with a "custom playstyle system", which allows you to adjust a large number of settings to how you want your game to be. So you could make it a lot easier and more of a building sim and less of a "oh my god everyone is going to die from raiders" sim. There's also a bunch of new visual effects and many new sound effects added in for free too. There's loads more, especially for the Royalty DLC like an entirely new major quest that involves defending a damaged shuttle or assaulting a bandit camp.

  • Competitive platform-jumper 'Jumpala' reveals new character, getting a free version

    Jumpala is an upcoming fast-paced competitive platformer that sees you constantly hopping across tiny little pads, it's actually brilliant fun and they've done a few new reveals recently. When you think about platformers, traditionally this would mean running along different floors, a little tricky jumping here and there and perhaps various enemy encounters. Jumpala is none of that. Instead, the whole arena scrolls upwards with small platforms each player needs to jump across, to turn it into their colour before it drops of the screen. It's highly competitive and from the early builds we played—a huge amount of fun.

  • Hilarious slapstick comedy game West of Loathing had an anniversary update

    Three years after launching, Asymmetric have given West of Loathing a big anniversary update to get rid of some issues and add in some silly new content. Even their version numbering is ridiculous, with this being update v1.11.11.11.1. From the creators of the browser-based comedy MMORPG Kingdom of Loathing, don't let the stick figures and super-simple style fool you, this is a great game worthy of your time and it's definitely funny. Easily on of 2017's best indie games. This is where you get to pick a character class between a Cow Puncher, a Beanslinger and a Snake Oiler so you know you're in a for a wild ride right away.

  • Check out the new trailer and demo for the sci-fi puzzle platformer Transmogrify

    Your facility appears to be overrun by strange creatures, with a forgetful research AI trying to help you escape but you do at least have a gun that can turn creatures into useful objects. This is Transmogrify, an upcoming sci-fi platformer that was partly funded on Kickstarter a few years back.