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Checking Out FuryBSD 12.1, KDE Edition

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BSD

FuryBSD is a relatively young project that is offering live systems using either KDE Plasma or the Xfce environment for the x86_64 architecture based on FreeBSD that can be installed from the desktop once booted up. This sounds quite appealing after having had good experiences with GhostBSD which is also based on FreeBSD and I was looking forward to check out a clean system using KDE.

Years ago I had tried the now discontinued PC-BSD with KDE but it seemed heavy and bloated. The website also looks lean, nice and professional, promising a "powerful, portable FreeBSD desktop" so expectations were up. Time to get the ISO. The last release is 12.1 and as indicated I opted to download the Plasma edition over Xfce. The file is 3.2 GB in size. If that is a problem or takes too long on a slow connection the Xfce edition comes in at a more manageable 1.6 GB. The file was then written to USB key. I tried both the 2020030701 release and the updated 2020042001 with similar results.

Booting up the FuryBSD live image we get a traditional black screen with Ascii style characters straight from the old days of computing. Such is the BSD heritage. There are a couple of options to boot into multi user (the default) or single user mode which allows us to go into text mode and also an option to abort. This is pretty much it. Unfortunately there is no way to start an installation from here so we'll have to boot into the desktop. Once we hit that option the boot sequence commences, predictably old style and without obfuscation. Lots of text scrolling by but that's ok with me.

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