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GNU nano 5.0 Open-Source Text Editor Released, This is What’s New

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GNU nano is probably one of the most popular text editors for the command line. It’s probably included in almost all GNU/Linux distribution is it usually comes in handy whenever there’s some configuration files you need to edit.

Dubbed “Among the fields of barley,” GNU nano 5.0 introduces a new --indicator parameter that displays some sort of scrollbar to show you where the viewport is located in the buffer and how much it covers, along with the --bookstyle parameter that makes nano consider any line that begins with a whitespace the start of a paragraph.

It’s now possible to tag any line with an anchor using the shortcut. You can then jump to the nearest anchor using and . GNU nano 5.0 also lest you access the Execute Command prompt directly from the main menu with ^T, as well as to toggle the help lines in all menus (except for the linter and help viewer) with M-X and list the possibilities at a filename prompt with .

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GNU nano 5.0 released

  • GNU nano 5.0 released
    2020.07.29 - GNU nano 5.0  "Among the fields of barley"
    
    • With --indicator (or -q or 'set indicator') nano will show a kind
      of scrollbar on the righthand side of the screen to indicate where
      in the buffer the viewport is located and how much it covers.
    • With <Alt+Insert> any line can be "tagged" with an anchor, and
      <Alt+PageUp> and <Alt+PageDown> will jump to the nearest anchor.
      When using line numbers, an anchor is shown as "+" in the margin.
    • The Execute Command prompt is now directly accessible from the
      main menu (with ^T, replacing the Spell Checker).  The Linter,
      Formatter, Spell Checker, Full Justification, Suspension, and
      Cut-Till-End functions are available in this menu too.
    • On terminals that support at least 256 colors, nine new color
      names are available: pink, purple, mauve, lagoon, mint, lime,
      peach, orange, and latte.  These do not have lighter versions.
    • For the color names red, green, blue, yellow, cyan, magenta,
      white, and black, the prefix 'light' gives a brighter color.
      Prefix 'bright' is deprecated, as it means both bold AND light.
    • All color names can be preceded with "bold," and/or "italic,"
      (in that order) to get a bold and/or italic typeface.
    • With --bookstyle (or -O or 'set bookstyle') nano considers any
      line that begins with whitespace as the start of a paragraph.
    • Refreshing the screen with ^L now works in every menu.
    • In the main menu, ^L also centers the line with the cursor.
    • Toggling the help lines with M-X now works in all menus except
      in the help viewer and the linter.
    • At a filename prompt, the first <Tab> lists the possibilities,
      and these are listed near the bottom instead of near the top.
    • Bindable function 'curpos' has been renamed to 'location'.
    • Long option --tempfile has been renamed to --saveonexit.
    • Short option -S is now a synonym of --softwrap.
    • The New Buffer toggle (M-F) has become non-persistent.  Options
      --multibuffer and 'set multibuffer' still make it default to on.
    • Backup files will retain their group ownership (when possible).
    • Data is synced to disk before "... lines written" is shown.
    • The raw escape sequences for F13 to F16 are no longer recognized.
    • Distro-specific syntaxes, and syntaxes of less common languages,
      have been moved down to subdirectory syntax/extra/.  The affected
      distros and others may wish to move wanted syntaxes one level up.
    • Syntaxes for Markdown, Haskell, and Ada were added.
    
    

Nano 5.0 Released As A Big Feature Update To This Easy-To-Use

  • Nano 5.0 Released As A Big Feature Update To This Easy-To-Use Terminal Text Editor

    The popular GNU Nano terminal text editor has reached version 5.0.

    Nano 5.0 has been released with a number of changes compared to the Nano 4.x series. Among the Nano 5.0 text editor highlights are:

    - The --indicator option can be used to provide a "scrollbar" on the right side of the screen to indicate approximately where in the buffer that the viewport / text is at.

    - The execute command prompt is now directly accessible from the main menu.

    - For terminals supporting at least 256 colors, new recognized color names include: pink, purple, mauve, lagoon, mint, lime, peach, orange, and latte. There are also new "light" variants on a number of existing common colors.

Open source text editor GNU nano has reached the milestone

  • Beginner-friendly Terminal-based Text Editor GNU Nano Version 5.0 Released

    Open source text editor GNU nano has reached the milestone of version 5.0. Take a look at what features this new release brings.

    There are plenty terminal-based text editors available for Linux. While editors like Emacs and Vim require a steep learning curve with bunch of unusual keyboard shortcuts, GNU nano is considered easier to use.

    Perhaps that’s the reason why Nano is the default terminal-based text editor in Ubuntu and many other distributions. Upcoming Fedora 33 release is also going to set Nano as the default text editor in terminal.

    GNU nano 5.0 has just been released. Here are the new features it brings.

By FOSSlife Team

  • GNU nano 5.0 Text Editor Released

    Version 5.0 of the popular open source GNU nano text editor has been released. This upgrade offers many enhancements and changes for Linux users, as listed on the nano website...

Robbie Harb (El Reg) on Nano

  • Venerable text editor GNU Nano reaches version 5.0 and adds the modern frippery that is scrollbars

    Cult text editor GNU Nano has released a major update, taking the terminal-based program to its fifth version in twenty years.

    The new update, called "Among the fields of barely", introduces a new --indicator command-line switch that will enable the display a kind of scrollbar on the right-hand side of the screen to indicate where in the buffer the viewport is located and how much it covers.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

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