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Sidux: A live CD for Debian unstable

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Linux
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Sidux aims to be the best Debian sid-based live CD -- and it succeeds. It offers a clean, easy hard disk install and a fast release cycle.

It's a rare distribution that impresses me before I've even tried it, but sidux did just that when, a few hours after I'd downloaded and burned a two-day-old preview release, the project announced that the next release was available for download. Clearly the sidux team intends to live up to its fast release philosophy. While I was downloading the new release I checked the forums, and found they were practically exploding with activity. That indicates a high level of popularity for a distribution that is only a few months old and has yet to reach its first final release.

The live CD's hardware detection worked well on several systems I tried, and the hard disk installation was an easy step-by-step process that walked me through partitioning, formatting, base package installation, configuration, updating the system, and installing additional software. The installation routine lets users choose Xfce, fluxbox, or fvwm-crystal as a window manager instead of the default KDE. The installer itself did most of the work -- I got a cup of coffee. The meta-package installation, which downloaded optional additional packages, took almost three times as long as the base installation, for a total of about 45 minutes.

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