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today's leftovers

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  • oneAPI compatibility with all openSUSE

    As leader of the openSUSE Innovator initiative, openSUSE member and official oneAPI innovator, I tested the new release of the tool on openSUSE Leap 15.1, 15.2 and Tumbleweed. With the total success of the work, I made available in the SDB an article on how to install this solution on the openSUSE platform. More information here: https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Install_oneAPI.

    oneAPI is an Unified, Standards-Based Programming Model. Modern workload diversity necessitates the need for architectural diversity; no single architecture is best for every workload. XPUs, including CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, and other accelerators, are required to extract high performance.

    This technology have the tools needed to deploy applications and solutions across these architectures. Its set of complementary toolkits—a base kit and specialty add-ons—simplify programming and help developers improve efficiency and innovation. The core Intel oneAPI DPC++ Compiler and libraries implement the oneAPI industry specifications available at https://www.oneapi.com/open-source/.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/31

    Week 31 has seen a steady flow of snapshots. The biggest snapshot was 0721, for which we had to do a full rebuild due to changes in the krb5 package, that moved some files around. In order for all packages to keep up with this change, the full rebuild was needed. The week in total has seen 7 snapshots being published (0721, 0724, 0726, 0727, 0728, 0729 and 0730)

  • Does Your Organization Need an Open Source Program Office?

    Every modern enterprise uses some open source software, or at the very least uses software that has open-source components. In an enterprise setting, the number of different open source projects an organization might use could easily be in the hundreds of thousands, and there could also easily be just as many engineers using those open source projects.

    While the reality is that enterprises use open source software, open source communities have a completely different culture — one focused on collaboration in a way that is foreign to most standard business environments.

    “As a business, it’s a culture change,” explained Jeff McAffer, who ran Microsoft’s Open Source Program Office for years and now is a director of product at GitHub focused on promoting open source in enterprises. “Many companies, they’re not used to collaboration. They’re not used to engaging with teams outside of their company.”

    What exactly are Open Source Program Offices (OSPOs)? What do they do, who needs them and why? We spoke with a couple of people who lead open source program offices to learn more.

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  • 50 Open Badges awarded for top LibreOffice translators!

    A few months ago, we announced Open Badges for LibreOffice contributors. These are custom images with embedded metadata, awarded to our most active community members to say thanks for their great work!

    The metadata describes the contributor’s work, and the badge can be verified using an external service. Open Badges are used by other free software projects, such as Fedora.

  • Ordering Browser Tabs Chronologically to Support Task Continuity

    Product teams working on Firefox at Mozilla have long been interested in helping people get things done, whether that’s completing homework for school, shopping for a pair of shoes, or doing one’s taxes. We are deeply invested in how we can support task continuity, the various steps that people take in getting things done, in our browser products. And we know that in our browsers, tabs play an important role for people carrying out tasks.

    [...]

    Fast forward to this year and the team working on Firefox for iOS was interested in how we might support task continuity involving leaving tabs open. We continued to see in user research the important role that tabs play in task continuity, and we wanted to explore how to make tab retrieval and overall tab management easier.

    In most web browsers on smartphones, tabs are ordered based on when a person first opened them, with the oldest tabs on one end of the interface (top, bottom, left, or right) and the newest tabs stacking to the opposite end of the interface. This ordering logic gets more complex if a new tab is prompted to open when someone taps on a link in an existing tab. A site may be designed to launch links in new tabs or a person may choose to open new tabs for links. The new tab, in that case, typically will open immediately next to the tab where the link was tapped, pushing all other later tabs toward the other end of the interface. All of this gets even trickier when managing more than just a few tabs. This brief demonstration illustrates tab ordering logic in Firefox for iOS before chronological tabs using the example of someone shopping for a good processor.

  • Tor’s Bug Smash Fund: Year Two!

    The Bug Smash Fund is back for its second year! In 2019, we launched Tor’s Bug Smash Fund to find and fix bugs in our software and conduct routine maintenance. Maintenance isn’t a flashy new feature, and that makes it less interesting to many traditional funders, but it’s what keeps the reliable stuff working--and with your support, we were able to close 77 tickets as a result.

    These bugs and issues ranged from maintenance on mechanisms for sending bridges via email and collecting metrics data to improving tor padding, testing, onion services, documentation, Tor Browser UX, and tooling for development. This work keeps Tor Browser, the Tor network, and the many tools that rely on Tor strong, safe, and running smoothly.

  • Say hello to the Linux Terminal 2.0 for Chrome OS

    Back in March, prior to the Chrome OS release calendar getting out of whack, the Linux terminal for Chrome OS was undergoing a major facelift that looked to be slated for the release of version 82. Since I generally live in the Canary channel, I was unaware that the update had not taken place. Instead, the refreshed Linux terminal actually arrived in the latest update to Chrome OS 84. Some of you reading this may be thinking “what the heck is a Linux terminal?” and that’s okay. Here’s a quick history lesson.

More in Tux Machines

PipeWire 0.3.44

This is a bugfix release that is API and ABI compatible with previous 0.3.x releases. Read more

Sway 1.7 improves screen capture and virtual reality in Wayland

sway 1.7 is available to continue the evolution of this Wayland composer and window manager based on or inspired by the popular i3. Despite being “just” a window manager, Sway is one of the most interesting developments when it comes to Wayland composers, and not only that, but is considered by many to be the best implementation of the protocol out there, even by comparison. on top of the GNOME Mutter. On the other hand, it has been one of the brave few to openly say “no” to NVIDIA and EGLStreams in order to narrowly defend the standards agreed upon by almost everyone around Wayland and GBM. You know, the word “standard” gives NVIDIA hives, and the exact reasons are known only to the corporation’s executives. The first notable new feature of Sway 1.7 is the remove option --my-next-gpu-wont-be-nvidia, so the ones that users will have to use from now on --unsupported-gpu instead. It’s important to note that, at least officially, the official NVIDIA driver is still not supported (Nouveau should be fine), but we assume that this is a first step towards integrating the particular GBM implementation powered by the GPU manufacturer. Read more

Mabox Linux 21.11 Herbolth released

After almost half year of development, the next major Mabox Linux 21.11 release codename Herbolth is ready for download. Read more

today's howtos

  • Hashing out the hash command on Linux | Network World

    When you type “hash” on a Linux system, you could get one of two very different responses depending on the shell you are using. If you are using bash or a related shell such as ksh, you should see a list of the commands that you have used since your terminal session began, sometimes with a count of how many times each command was used. This can be more useful than using the history command if you just want to see your very recent command activity, but the hash command is not a single executable. Instead, it relies on your shell.

  • Learn About Blender and Maybe Get a Free Book – What’s Not to Like?

    The event is Blender 101, an online event from the All Things Open folks, which will feature Jason van Gumster, author of Blender for Dummies, which is popular enough to now be in its fourth edition. Better yet, some copies of the book will be given away “to randomly chosen attendees.”

  • Why must you use ./ to run your Ubuntu scripts? The meaning of Linux's dot slash explained. - Coffee Talk: Java, News, Stories and Opinions

    When you run your own executable command or shell script on Linux, you must prepend ./ to the Unix command. But why? Why must you use a dot slash to run commands in Unix? You don’t have to do that in Windows with a batch file.

  • What Is Doas and How to Install It

    Doas is a privilege escalation program similar to sudo. It is designed to be as lightweight and simple as possible. It is the default privilege escalation program for OpenBSD but also available for other UNIX-like operating systems through the OpenDoas program.

  • Shell Aliases Every Linux User Needs - Invidious

    One of the most common questions I get from new-to-Linux users is, "How can I become a power user?" Well, learning the terminal and the terminal commands is the best thing you can do. And big part of becoming more proficient at the command line is creating your own Bash aliases. So today, I'm taking a fresh install of Ubuntu and adding aliases to it's bashrc. These are aliases that I think most, if not all, Ubuntu users would find helpful.