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The Best Authenticator Apps for Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

If you have ever used two-factor authentication before, then you have probably heard of tools like Google Authenticator. To make use of many of these services, you’ll have to have your phone near you. Luckily, there are desktop authenticator apps that can provide you with the secret key you need to log in to your account. Below are the best authenticator apps for the Linux desktop.

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Yubico works with a hardware security token known as the Yubikey. You can store your credentials on this as opposed to on your device. This hardware security token can even be further secured by choosing to unlock it with either FaceID or TouchID.

With Yubico, you will also be able to easily transition between devices, even after upgrading. The Yubico app lets you generate multiple secrets across devices, making it simple for you to switch.

I have to admit that the security offered by a physical token like the Yubikey is great. However, users must bear in mind that they must have the key with them if they wish to use two-factor authentication. I know you may argue and say this is no better than having to carry a phone with you. However, you can’t put your phone on a keychain! Additionally, it’s tough to crack a hardware token. Someone would have to steal it from you if they wanted to access your data. Even after doing that, they still won’t know any of your passwords or anything else of the sort.

With Yubico Authenticator, you first have to insert your key before you can add services to the app. After inserting your key, you can then add a security token from a service you want to enable two-factor authentication for. This is an app more for a power user due to the steps that must be taken to get it set up.

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