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Nitrux 1.3.1 is available to download

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GNU
KDE
Linux

We are pleased to announce the launch of Nitrux 1.3.1. This new version brings together the latest software updates, bug fixes, performance improvements, and ready-to-use hardware support.

Nitrux 1.3.1 is available for immediate download.

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Nitrux 1.3.1 Released: A Beautiful Linux Distro With Portable...

  • Nitrux 1.3.1 Released: A Beautiful Linux Distro With Portable App Format

    Ahead of the current Nitrux 1.3.0, its founder Uri Herrera has released a new point version — Nitrux 1.3.1. The latest v1.3.1 comes with several software updates, bug fixes, performance improvements, and new hardware support.

    Nitrux is one of the unique Linux distributions not only because of its beautiful KDE Plasma desktop but also for using a portable universal application format, AppImage, in addition to a package manager like APT and DPKG. So, let’s see what more Nitrux 1.3.1 offers.

Nitrux 1.3.1 Released with Latest Plasma Desktop

  • Nitrux 1.3.1 Released with Latest Plasma Desktop, Improved Installer, and Faster Installation

    As expected, Nitrux 1.3.1 is an updated media of the distribution that ships with the latest and greatest software. It includes the recently released KDE Plasma 5.19.4 desktop environment, along with the KDE Applications 20.04.03 and KDE Frameworks 5.72.0 open-source software suites.

    If you’re a fan of the KDE Plasma desktop environment, these components mentioned above are the only reason you should download the latest Nitrux release and install it on your personal computer. If you already have Nitrux installed, congratulations, you’re already running the newest KDE technologies.

    Also updated in the Nitrux 1.3.1 is the Linux kernel, which means better support for newer hardware, though I was expecting to see Nitrux already using the Linux 5.7 kernel series by now, but there must be a reason the developers are still sticking with Linux kernel 5.6.

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