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Audiocasts/Shows: Debian 10.5 KDE Plasma Run Through, Late Night Linux, Linux Headlines

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  • Debian 10.5 KDE Plasma Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Debian 10.5. Enjoy!

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 95

    A look back at the year in Linux so far, some speculation about what’s coming, Lineage OS on the Raspberry Pi, and KDE Korner.

  • 2020-08-03 | Linux Headlines

    Linux kernel 5.8 is out, BunsenLabs rebases to Debian 10 “Buster,” Mastodon releases version 3.2 with multimedia enhancements, and The Linux Foundation forms the Open Source Security Foundation.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Delver, Blasphemous, Grey Hack, Arachnowopunk and Bevy

  • First person dungeon-crawler 'Delver' properly open source again, pulls in lots of updates

    After only recently being released on itch.io, it seems the team behind the chunky-pixel first-person dungeon crawler Delver aren't done. What actually is Delver? It's a dungeon crawler that has a sweet mix of 90s FPS combat blended with classic RPG mechanics, permadeath and procedural generation so it's a good test of skill and something fun to keep coming back to for just one more run. It also looks pretty darn awesome.

  • Explore a nightmarish world of twisted religion in Blasphemous - now available for Linux

    The Game Kitchen and Team17 have now delivered on their promise of official Linux (and macOS) support for Blasphemous as it's now available. Set in a world where a foul curse has fallen upon the land simply known as The Miracle, which visibly and tangibly manifests peoples "guilt, repentance, mourning and every pain of the soul of all kind". You play as The Penitent One, sole survivor of a massacre known as the Silent Sorrow. Trapped in an endless cycle of death and rebirth, it’s down to you to free the world from this terrible fate and reach the origin of your anguish. It sounds quite horrible but it sure does make for an engrossing setting.

  • A little hacking on a Monday morning? Why not with the online sim Grey Hack

    Feel like letting off some steam and do a little hacking? How about in a safe environment that also happens to be a game where everyone is trying to do it? Grey Hack sounds amusing. Grey Hack is not a new game, it actually released on Steam in Early Access back in 2017. Similar in idea to another game called hackmud, except that Grey Hack is constantly updated with new features and expands what you can do.

  • Arachnowopunk is a single-button infinite-runner mini-metroidvania

    Benny Heller, developer of Arachnowopunk emailed in to show off their new single-button infinite-runner mini-metroidvania and it's quite sweet. Developed partly on Ubuntu with the wonderful cross-platform HaxeFlixel, it's an incredibly accessible and simple game on the surface. You just have to keep going, tapping the up arrow key to switch between platforms and keep on running. Mechanically simple, with smooth pixel-art but the game certainly isn't simple to actually play. It will require your full attention to get through.

  • Bevy seems like an impressive upcoming free and open source game engine made with Rust

    Feeling a little rusty? After a new game engine for your next game development project? Have a look at Bevy, a cross-platform and open source data-driven game engine built in Rust. [...] Just recently on September 19, 2020 it had a big new release too. Bevy 0.2 brings in some advanced new features, like a custom async-friendly task system which they showed some impressive CPU performance wins. It also adds in some early work towards Bevy running on the web using WebAssembly/WASM, with an example game (try it here). On top of that it adds in cross-platform support for most controllers with with GilRs game in put library and plenty more.

Free Linux Cloud Servers to Test or Host Your Web Applications

Looking for free cloud Linux server to test your web-app or service? Here are the best cloud servers with free credits options. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #96

    We didn't have to many Linux distro releases in this week, only PC Linux OS 2020.09 and 4M Linux 34.0.

  • Call for testing: OpenSSH 8.4

    OpenSSH 8.4p1 is almost ready for release, so we would appreciate testing on as many platforms and systems as possible. This is a bugfix release.

  • k2k20 hackathon report: Martijn van Duren on snmp, agentx, and other progress
  • Cambrionix SyncPad54 USB Hub Offers 56 USB 2.0 Ports

    This week-end FanlessTech posted a tweet about Portwell PEB-9783G2AR Intel Xeon board featuring twenty USB 3.0 Type-A ports. After I retweeted it, some smart asses clever people noted it was just not enough:

  • How coffee makers and teddy bears could be putting your network at risk

    Ever worry that your smart TV might be sending data to someone who shouldn’t be looking at it? Have you ever wondered if your kids’ smart teddy bear is secretly recording them? We get it — cyberattacks are common. But you’re not being paranoid, either. Despite how safe they might seem on the surface, a huge percentage of IoT devices are actually at risk for attack.

    A new security report from Palo Alto Networks tells us that 57% of IoT devices are vulnerable to cyberattacks of “medium to high severity.” That’s well over half of all smart devices out there — and IoT tech isn’t just limited to gadgets anymore, either.

  • Chrome OS 87 Dev Channel brings working LaCrOS and Nearby Share to Chromebooks

    Can’t wait to try the latest upcoming features of Chrome OS? You’re in luck if those features are LaCrOS and Nearby Share of files to Android phones. The latest Dev Channel for Chrome OS pushes both of these features to your Chromebook in a mostly working state. My Chromebook got the Chrome OS 87 Dev Channel upgrade over the weekend and I noticed I could test these features out. If you’re not familiar with them, here’s a short recap. [...] That will greet you with the Linux version of Chrome, which you can set as your default browser. I wouldn’t recommend that while LaCrOS is in development, but that’s up to you.

  • Hackaday Links: September 20, 2020

    The GNU Radio Conference wrapped up this week, in virtual format as so many other conferences have been this year, and it generated a load of interesting talks. They’ve got each day’s proceedings over on their YouTube channel, so the videos are pretty long; luckily, each day’s stream is indexed on the playbar, so along with the full schedule you can quickly find the talks you’re interested in. One that caught our eye was a talk on the Radio Resilience Competition, a hardware challenge where participants compete head-to-head using SDRs to get signals through in an adversarial environment. It sounds like a fascinating challenge for the RF inclined. More details about registering for the competition can be had on the Radio Resilience website.

  • Why you need Apple support to secure the C-suite

    That’s a pattern that continues today. Your employees may not be living like the Jetsons at work, but your CEO, CFO, COO and all the other Cs and near-Cs are far more likely to be giving it a go. Which means your corporate data is already on iPhones, iPads and Macs – and it’s not just any old data: This is the most confidential data your company holds – the information your executive teams use to run the business that pays your team’s wages.

  • Softbank's two major competition cases: Apple-Intel antitrust suit against Fortress, and merger review of Nvidia's envisioned acquisition of ARM

    Softbank--though huge--was mentioned on this blog for the first time when Intel and Apple brought an antitrust action against its Fortress Investment subsidiary over the industrialized abuse of patents. That case is still pending, and another major competition case involving Softbank is around the corner: its contemplated sale of chip company ARM to Nvidia for $40 bilion is likely to draw regulatory scrutiny in multiple jurisdictions. While my focus will definitely remain on App Store antitrust cases (as an app developer and antitrust commentator, I'm doubly interested) and component-level licensing of standard-essential patents, the Apple and Intel v. Fortress litigation and the upcoming Softbank-ARM merger reviews are also worth keeping an eye on. In this post I'd like to share a few observations on both matters.