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Leftovers: LibreOffice, GNU Projects

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GNU
Software

  • [Haiku] July 2020 Activity Report

    Welcome to the July, 2020 Activity Report for the Haiku project!

    This report covers hrev54370 through hrev54484.

  • Neo Colibre for Maximum Productivity

    Having fun everyone. I wish you are all doing good in this tough time.

    It was Adolfo who complaint about Colibre's failure to accomplish WCAG contrast guideline. He said the colors are too faint and everything looks washed out. Furthermore, MS Office 365 has since moved those colors to a brand new monoline style iconography. See this bug report for details

    So I took the chance to update this Windows default icon theme. Luckily, the icon theme comes with SVG version, I can easily use bash script to automate a neccessary color conversion, and take the rest manually. In one month, I finally managed to finish this "Neo" Colibre. Hopefully this will benefit the largest LibreOffice user platform (approximately more than ~80%).

  • Simulated Animation Effects Week#9

    Last week I’ve started by working on support for Custom Shapes. At first I didn’t how could I get the related geometry information about Custom Shapes. Upon asking on IRC, mst (Micheal Stahl) directed me to SdrObject class. Inspecting this class, found out a child of it that handles Custom Shapes called SdrObjCustomShape had a function SdrObjCustomShape::GetLineGeometry was returning exactly what I’ve wanted in the first place a B2DPolyPolygon! So I went ahead and created an implementation that if the shape type is CustomShape, it got corresponding SdrObject using it’s XShape and casted the SdrObject* to an SdrObjCustomShape* and got the B2DPolyPolygon from that. Then it triangulated this polygon using basegfx::triangulator::triangulate, and added resulting collection of triangles to a box2d body.

  • Best Photoshop alternatives 2020

    GIMP boasts a huge number of features and functions that rival Photoshop. There’s also a huge community of developers and artists who have created a wide array of plugins, making this a highly adaptable program. If you desire a specific feature, there’s probably an add-on for it. 

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  • AMD HSA Offloading Support Dropped From The GCC Compiler

    There didn't appear to be much usage ever out of the AMD HSA (Heterogeneous System Architecture) support within the GCC compiler and hadn't been maintained in a while so now has been wiped out of the GNU Compiler Collection.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Another Minor Annoyance

    Once more going way out of order since it’s fresh in my mind, today will be a brief look at gl_InstanceID and a problem I found there while hooking up ARB_base_instance.

    gl_InstanceID is an input for vertex shaders which provides the current instance being processed by the shader. It has a range of [0, instanceCount], and this breaks the heck out of Vulkan.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Build a successful community using a Linux leader's playbook

I love books about technology. My idea of a relaxing weekend is—legitimately—settling in with my copy of DocBook: The Definitive Guide (TDG to those of us who us who've read the whole series). I love learning to understand and integrate technology, and so those are the books I read. But when I heard that Jono Bacon, former community manager of Ubuntu Linux, had written a book about understanding and integrating people, I was intrigued enough to purchase the book for myself. This past weekend, I sat down with the book and read it from cover to cover. I'll admit I still don't understand people, but for the cover price of the book, I do have a few years' worth of new insight. Read more

Linux Jargon Buster: What is FOSS? What is Open Source?

In this part of Linux jargon buster, learn about the FOSS principles. Learn what is FOSS, what is open source and why you should care about it. Read more

Games: Discover, Overland and DOSBox on Chromebooks

     
  • Another Discord voice chat overlay for Linux appears with 'Discover'

    Since the official Discord client doesn't currently support the Overlay on Linux, it's up to the community and another has been released named Discover. Not to be confused with the KDE application store, which is also named Discover. The Discover overlay for Discord was created by the same people as the last one we wrote about. This time, it's a little different. They're not relying on Discord's StreamKit and it instead interacts with the Discord client directly. This means it could expand to support other chat applications too in future perhaps, plus they said it should also be "lighter on system resources and less hack-and-slash included than discord-overlay".

  • Post-apocalyptic road-trip strategy Overland has a big 1.2 update with an all-dogs mode

    Possibly one of the most stylish turn-based strategy games around and one that's also rather difficult, Overland just had a big 1.2 update released with some funny new additions. A post-apocalyptic road-trip game all about making tough decisions. You thought XCOM 2 was difficult? Overland can be quite on the brutal side. Small maps that don't give you a lot of wiggle room, with one misstep it might all be over. Every noise you make only brings weird creatures closer and you've got to get moving across the United States. [...] Finding another dog and inviting them into my crew might be the sweetest thing I've seen in a turn-based strategy game, as they both give a little "woof" and wag their tails and suddenly I've got a two-dog crew driving across the USA during the end of the world. It's weirdly wholesome, until one of them dies that is — so sad.

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  • Revisit childhood games with DOSBox on your Chromebook

    I’m back at it! I spent the better part of yesterday morning tinkering with virtual machines and the Linux container on my Chromebook to see was sort of shenanigans I could get myself into. Somewhere along the way, I decided to fiddle with MS-DOS. More on that later. Along the way, I discovered a nifty little app that I had never heard of until this week. Just to be clear, this application is not new. In fact, it’s been around for nearly two decades and its sole purpose is to emulate DOS in an x86 environment. [...] There you go. You’re all set. You can now launch DOSBox from the terminal by just typing or you can open it with the app icon that is now in your app launcher. I’m sure you’re now wondering what you can actually do with DOSBox. Don’t worry. We’ll get to that next. As I mentioned above, DOSBox has been reworked to bring countless older video games directly to the web by allowing users to play in the browser. Chances are decent that, if you are looking for one of your favorite childhood games, it’s available in a browser-based version. Sites such as playclassic.games use this very technology to run games like Oregon Trail, DOOM, and Civilization I&II. Anyway, you can use DOSBox to do the very same thing locally on your Chromebook. Here’s how to get your favorite MS-DOS games on Chrome OS using DOSBox. First, we will need a game to play. For many DOS games, you can download the .exe file and run the game directly from that file. Other games, like the example we’re using, has an installation file. That file will create the .exe file that will launch the game. In honor of all the Intel Gemini Lake Chromebooks out there, we will be installing the cult classic Commander Keen. If you have no clue what I’m talking about, most Chromebook code names and baseboards are named after video game or animated characters. The original Google Cr-48 is code-named Mario. More recent devices powered by Intel’s Gemini Lake processors are named after characters from ID Software’s Commander Keen series of video games.