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5 reasons to run Kubernetes on your Raspberry Pi homelab

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Linux
OSS

There's a saying about the cloud, and it goes something like this: The cloud is just somebody else's computer. While the cloud is actually more complex than that (it's a lot of computers), there's a lot of truth to the sentiment. When you move to the cloud, you're moving data and services and computing power to an entity you don't own or fully control. On the one hand, this frees you from having to perform administrative tasks you don't want to do, but, on the other hand, it could mean you no longer control your own computer.

This is why the open source world likes to talk about an open hybrid cloud, a model that allows you to choose your own infrastructure, select your own OS, and orchestrate your workloads as you see fit. However, if you don't happen to have an open hybrid cloud available to you, you can create your own—either to help you learn how the cloud works or to serve your local network.

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Benchmarking Firefox 83 Nightly With "Warp" Against Google Chrome On Linux

Following last week's news of Firefox Nightly flipping on their new JIT "Warp" update I was eager to run fresh benchmarks of the current Firefox releases compared to Google Chrome under Ubuntu Linux. Warp was enabled last week for Firefox 83 nightly builds with this "Warp" just-in-time JavaScript compiler update having various improvements in an effort to provide greater responsiveness and faster page load speeds. Numbers cited by Mozilla engineers on their JavaScript/SpiderMonkey team were frequently in the 5~15% range. Even instances like Google Docs load times on Windows was around 20% faster with Warp. This round of benchmarking was done with Firefox 81, Firefox 82 Beta 3, and Firefox 83 Alpha 1 nightly as of last week after Warp landed. A secondary run of Firefox 83 nightly was also done with WebRender force enabled on Linux. Plus Google Chrome 85 was also tested as the latest stable release. Read more

Linux-driven COM duo tap i.MX8M Plus

TechNexion’s rugged “EDM-G-IMX8M-PLUS” and “AXON-E-IMX8M-PLUS” modules run Linux on NXP’s 2.3 TOPS i.MX8M Plus with up to 8GB LPDDR4, 16GB eMMC, WiFi/BT, and starter kits. There are also new i.MX8M Mini and Nano EDM modules. TechNexion has posted product pages for two compute modules that feature NXP’s i.MX8M Plus. The EDM-G-IMX8M-PLUS is essentially the same as the wireless enabled Wandboard IMX8M-Plus-4G module option on the sandwich-style Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC announced in August. However, it offers up to 8GB LPDDR4 instead of 4GB. The AXON-E-IMX8M-PLUS provides essentially the same capabilities but in TechNexion’s more rugged, 58 x 37mm AXON form-factor, which was used on the i.MX8M Mini-based AXON-IMX8M-Mini module. Read more