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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Fujitsu Begins Adding A64FX Support To GCC Compiler

    The Fujitsu A64FX ARM processor that has 48 cores per node and 32GB of HBM2 memory that currently powers the fastest supercomputer is beginning to see GCC compiler support.

    Fujitsu months ago upstreamed A64FX support to the LLVM/Clang compiler. It appears this ARMv8.2-based chip with 512-bit SIMD is using LLVM/Clang as its preferred compiler. But now Fujitsu is also upstreaming GCC support for their high performance A64FX.

  • Jussi Pakkanen: The second edition of the Meson manual is out

    I have just uploaded the second edition of the Meson manual to the web store for your purchasing pleasure.

  • Junichi Uekawa: Started writing some golang code.

    Started writing some golang code. Trying to rewrite some of the tools as a daily driver for machine management tool. It's easier than rust in that having a good rust compiler is a hassle though golang preinstalled on systems can build and run. go run is simple enough to invoke on most Debian systems.

  • Url Shortner in Golang

    I decided to write my own URL shortner and the reason for doing that was to dive a little more into golang and to learn more about systems. I have planned to not only document my learning but also find and point our different ways in which this application can be made scalable, resilient and robust.

  • LLVM Clang 11 Has A Nice Build Speed Improvement With New Feature For Pre-Compiled Headers

    There are many improvements in LLVM/Clang 11.0 due out in the weeks ahead though an interesting change merged prior to last month's code branching that slipped under our radar... If using the clang-cl driver for MSVC or when otherwise making use of pre-compiled headers (PCH) functionality, there is a new option that can offer significant build time speed-ups.

    When making use of Clang PCH functionality for leveraging pre-compiled headers, Clang 11.0 is introducing the -fpch-instantiate-templates option separate from the existing PCH options. This -fpch-instantiate-templates option instantiates templates already while generating a precompiled header instead of instantiating every time the pre-compiled header is used. Avoiding the instantiation each time the pre-compiled header is used can provide measurable build time improvements. Aside from the MSVC clang-cl drop-in, this feature though isn't enabled by default since it can result in errors if the source header file is not self-contained.

  • Call for Code Daily: open source projects and answered calls

    The power of Call for Code® is in the global community that we have built around this major #TechforGood initiative. Whether it is the deployments that are underway across pivotal projects, developers leveraging the starter kits in the cloud, or ecosystem partners joining the fight, everyone has a story to tell. Call for Code Daily highlights all the amazing #TechforGood stories taking place around the world. Every day, you can count on us to share these stories with you. Check out the stories from the week of August 3rd:

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 6 Check-in

    Works towards analyzing multistage dockerfile. I combined the draft PR and the review from my mentors, the new commit is the first step of my plan. We split the multistage dockerfile into seperate dockefiles for build. Here are the changes in the new commit.

    1. Modified function check_multistage_dockerfile() to return.

    2. Remove function split_multistage_dockerfile() since we are working on the building stage. split_multistage_dockerfile() can be improved on analyze stage.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxix) stackoverflow python report
  • Send WhatsApp media/message using Python.

    Though there are many scripts available which are almost free but later on leads to getting blocked by Whatsapp.

    We can use Twilio Library for sending and receiving whatsapp messages even for WhatsApp bussiness.

  • Generate a random number in Java

    Java contains many ways to generate random numbers. The random number can be int, long, float, double, and Boolean. Math.random class and Random class are mostly used to generate random numbers in Java. The uses of these classes are shown in this tutorial by using various examples.

    [...]

    The random class has many methods to generate different types of random numbers, such as nextInt(), nextDouble(), nextLong, etc. So, the integer and fractional numbers can be generated by using the appropriate method of this class. You have to create an object to use in this class.

  • Open Source Jenkins CI/CD Project Graduates From CD Foundation

    Officially launched by the Linux Foundation in March 2019, the CD Foundation includes in its project portfolio some of the most widely used and deployed CI/CD tools, including Jenkins, Spinnaker and Tekton. The open source Jenkins CI/CD project gains more community participation and a roadmap for future improvements.

More in Tux Machines

Proprietary Software: Todoist, FreeOffice, and Even Worse

  • Todoist Takes on Trello with New Kanban Board Feature

    Todoist now has a Kanban board feature similar to that made popular by Trello. Kanban boards are an effective project management tool designed to make it easier to organise tasks within projects and get an overview of overall project status. While Kanban boards aren’t super fancy they are, for some, super useful. “A more visual way to organize your projects. Drag tasks between sections, visualize your progress, and simplify your teamwork,” Todoist say of the feature.

  • SoftMaker FreeOffice: A cross-platform Office suite that’s fully compatible to MS Office

    Most Linux users are well-acquainted with LibreOffice – many distributions have it pre-installed. Fewer know its powerful alternative: FreeOffice is a full-fledged office solution with full support for Microsoft Office file formats. It consists of a word processor, a spreadsheet and a presentation program. True to its name, FreeOffice is fully free and available for Linux in 32-bit and 64-bit versions. FreeOffice is far from a LibreOffice clone. The software is being developed by a German software company with a history going all the way back to 1987. Due to its background, FreeOffice has far more in common with Microsoft Office than with LibreOffice.

  • Cutting corners on cybersecurity can leave costly holes [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Such attacks can paralyse an organisation as it weighs up concerns over prolonged business interruption, reputational damage and data protection responsibilities against the financial impact and the ethical implications of capitulating to the demands. The decision to pay or not to pay is very much the question – especially when university budgets are so tight.

    The advice of the NCSC, as well as Jisc, is very clear: do not pay! A range of reasons are cited, but the prime one is the inability of institutions to be sure that the [attacker] will undo the damage and not exploit the data breach at a later date. Those who pay up justify doing so on the grounds of business criticality and expediency. They also rely on the “honour among thieves” paradigm that [attackers] will stick to their word so that victims of future attacks will also feel confident in paying up.

  • As critics call for deplatforming, defunding, and prosecution over Leila Khaled discussion, San Francisco State University president gets it right

    Yesterday, Zoom refused to allow the university to use its service for the discussion — a cancellation praised by FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr, who said there was no “need to hear both sides.” It is not yet clear whether the organizers of the event will switch to another channel of communication.

Android Leftovers

Security: Patches, Ease of Use and Debian Key Signing

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by openSUSE (libetpan, libqt4, lilypond, otrs, and perl-DBI), Red Hat (kernel-rt), Slackware (seamonkey), SUSE (grafana, libmspack, openldap2, ovmf, pdns, rubygem-actionpack-5_1, and samba), and Ubuntu (debian-lan-config, ldm, libdbi-perl, and netty-3.9).

  • Balancing Linux security with usability

    Building an operating system is a difficult balance, and a Linux distribution is no different. You need to consider the out-of-the-box functionality that most people are going to want, and accessibility for a wide swath of administrators' skillsets. If you make your distro very secure, but a newbie sysadmin can't figure out how to work with it…well, they're going to find an easier distribution to go learn on, and now you've lost that admin to another distribution. So it's really no surprise that, right after install time, most Linux distributions need a little bit of tweaking to lock them down. This has gotten better over the years, as the installers themselves have gotten easier to use and more feature-rich. You can craft a pretty custom system right from the GUI installer. A base Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) system, for example, if you've chosen the base package set, is actually pretty light on unnecessary services and packages. There was a time when that was not true. Can you imagine passwords being hashed, but available in /etc/password for any user to read? Or all system management being carried out over Telnet? SSH wasn't even on, by default. Host-based firewall? Completely optional. So, 20 years ago, locking down a newly installed Linux system meant a laundry list of tasks. Luckily, as computing has matured, so has the default install of just about any operating system.

  • Key signing in the pandemic era

    The pandemic has changed many things in our communities, even though distance has always played a big role in free software development. Annual in-person gatherings for conferences and the like are generally paused at the moment, but even after travel and congregating become reasonable again, face-to-face meetings may be less frequent. There are both positives and negatives to that outcome, of course, but some rethinking will be in order if that comes to pass. The process of key signing is something that may need to change as well; the Debian project, which uses signed keys, has been discussing the subject. In early August, Enrico Zini posted a note to the debian-project mailing list about people who are trying to get involved in Debian, but who are lacking the necessary credentials in the form of an OpenPGP key signed by other Debian project members. The requirements for becoming a Debian Maintainer (DM) or Debian Developer (DD) both involve keys with signatures from existing DDs; two signatures for becoming a DD or one for becoming a DM. Those are not the only steps toward becoming formal members of Debian, but they are ones that may be hampering those who are trying to do so right now. DDs and DMs use their keys to sign packages that are being uploaded to the Debian repository, so the project needs to have some assurance that the keys are valid and are controlled by someone that is not trying to undermine the project or its users. In addition, votes in Debian (for project leaders and general resolutions) are made using the keys. They are a fundamental part of the Debian infrastructure.

KDDockWidgets 1.0 has been released

KDDockWidgets is an advanced docking system for Qt, with features that are not available in QDockWidget. See our first blog post, for a quick introduction and the motivation for a new docking framework. We’ve come a long way since the initial announcement of KDDockWidgets. The 1.0 release represents the culmination of one year of using the library in production for five different huge projects — one year of incorporating real feedback in the form of new features, bug fixes, or simply making the framework more customizable. Read more