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Debian GNU/Linux 11 (Bullseye) Artwork Contest Is Now Open for Entries

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GNU
Linux
Debian

This is the moment for aspiring artists and designers who want to display their work in front of millions of Debian users to submit their best artwork for the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 11 (Bullseye) operating system series, due for release in mid-2021.

Submissions are opened until November 1st, 2020, but your artwork needs to meet the following specifications. For example, you will have to create a wiki page for your artwork proposal at DebianArt/Themes, write down a few words about your idea, use an image format that can be later modified using free and open source software, and add a license that lets the Debian Project distribute your artwork within Debian GNU/Linux.

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Artwork Help Is Needed For Debian 11 "Bullseye"

  • Artwork Help Is Needed For Debian 11 "Bullseye"

    If you are more of an artistic type than programmer, there still is plenty of valuable assistance that can be provided to free software projects... The latest call for help is that of the Debian project in looking for the Debian 11 "Bullseye" desktop artwork.

    The formal call for the Debian 11 artwork proposals has been sent out in coming up with the desktop look-and-feel for this free software GNU/Linux platform come its release next year.

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