Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

First OpenSolaris derivative in the wild

Filed under
OS

Dubbed 'SchilliX' after its principal developer, veteran German open source programmer Jorg Schilling, the operating system has been in development for four months with the approval of Sun Microsystems.

SchilliX allows users to try out OpenSolaris for themselves without installing it to their hard disk, as it can be run directly from a CD-ROM. However, it can also be installed onto a hard disk or a sizeable USB storage device.

Announcing the initial release of his project on his blog, Schilling said he had supplemented the OpenSolaris code with additional material to achieve a workable system. While the programmer drew most of the extra software from open source projects like FreeBSD, he had developed some himself.

"The main goal was to implement as much source/binary compatibility to Sun Solaris as possible," he said, noting this was a tough task.

Schilling said the aim of developing SchilliX was to help people discover OpenSolaris. "When installed on a hard drive, it also allows developers to develop and compile code in a pure OpenSolaris environment," he said.

The project's Web site makes it clear SchilliX is not only intended for the technically-minded.

"OpenSolaris, and in this case, the SchilliX distribution are projects which will improve the use of Solaris on the typical desktop PC," it states. "These projects will show non-technical people that there is an operating system which is very useful for their work".

The distribution includes common open source software like the popular gcc compiler, and even Schilling's own CD burning program cdrecord. It has been licensed under Sun's own Common Development and Distribution Licence (CDDL).

SchilliX is currently available in English and German, and requires at least 256MB of memory to run. It is designed to run on common 32 and 64-bit x86-based platforms from Intel and AMD, although it does not currently boot on the AMD64 chipset. Installing the distribution on a hard disk requires at least 1 gigabyte of space.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

ChromeOS vs Linux: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Anyone who believes Google isn't "making a play" for desktop users isn't paying attention. In recent years, I've seen ChromeOS making quite a splash on the Google Chromebook. Exploding with popularity on sites such as Amazon.com, it looks as if ChromeOS could be unstoppable. In this article, I'm going to look at ChromeOS as a concept to market, how it's affecting Linux adoption and whether or not it's a good/bad thing for the Linux community as a whole. Plus, I'll talk about the biggest issue of all and how no one is doing anything about it. Read more

Android powered Nvidia Shield tablet now available for pre-order

Nvidia’s 32GB LTE Shield Tablet is now available for pre-order. The Linux/Android powered tablet is priced at $399 and comes with an 8″ (1,920 x 1,200) display, Tegra K1 CPU and 2GB of RAM. Read more

FOSS Around the World: Latin America

Too often coverage of free/open source software news and commentary tends to focus on either developments and activities in North America or in Europe. While much of the news is made on these two continents, there’s a wider world out there where folks are doing some substantial things, and promoting FOSS in their own way in their own areas. Periodically, we at FOSS Force will be looking at areas of the world which have been either overlooked or neglected in digital news coverage. Today we’ll start south of the U.S. border with Latin America — Mexico, along with Central and South America, for those of you keeping track on maps at home. Read more

OpenMediaVault 1.0 review

OpenMediaVault is a NAS/SAN Linux distribution that I first wrote about on this site back in January 2013. That was when the version 0.4.11 was released. The latest version, a milestone release, is OpenMediaVault 1.0. It is based on Debian 7 and uses that distribution’s ncurses installer, just like Ubuntu server. This is a distribution you want to use if you are looking for an easy-to-use and feature-rich solution to set up a NAS for yourself. The browser-based management interface on this latest edition is a lot better than the one that shipped with previous editions. And it is also responsive. Read more