Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian: DebConf20 Sponsors (Microsoft Money Rejected for First Time Since 2016) and Debcamp/LTS Activities

Filed under
Debian
  • DebConf20 welcomes its sponsors!

    DebConf20 is taking place online, from 23 August to 29 August 2020. It is the 21st Debian conference, and organizers and participants are working hard together at creating interesting and fruitful events.

    We would like to warmly welcome the 17 sponsors of DebConf20, and introduce them to you.

    We have four Platinum sponsors.

    Our first Platinum sponsor is Lenovo. As a global technology leader manufacturing a wide portfolio of connected products, including smartphones, tablets, PCs and workstations as well as AR/VR devices, smart home/office and data center solutions, Lenovo understands how critical open systems and platforms are to a connected world.

    Our next Platinum sponsor is Infomaniak. Infomaniak is Switzerland's largest web-hosting company, also offering backup and storage services, solutions for event organizers, live-streaming and video on demand services. It wholly owns its datacenters and all elements critical to the functioning of the services and products provided by the company (both software and hardware).

  • David Bremner: Debcamp activities 2018 [Ed: Newly edited]
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, July 2020

    Like each month, albeit a bit later due to vacation, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare" Plasma Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare", the Plasma edition and it is amazing.

  • CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare" Plasma

    Today we are looking at the amazing CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare", KDE Plasma release. This is their first stable release and WOW, I am truly impressed. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.14, KDE Plasma 5.22, based on Arch, and uses about 1.2GB of ram when idling. Enjoy!

  • Pinephone Pro: Mobile Linux To The Next Level - Invidious

    I've been thinking of buying a pinephoen for a while and seemingly out of nowhere the pinephone pro has been announced so let's have a look at what it's like

  • Five of Tuesday’s ‘All Things Open’ Presentations We Wouldn’t Miss

    Yesterday — just in case you were looking for something to do — we told you about five talks on Monday’s All Things Open schedule that we were planning on watching online (which we did, and they were even better than expected). Today, we’re doing the same with ATO’s Tuesday schedule, because hey, that’s just the way we roll. You might have noticed yesterday that we left the keynotes off our list, which we’re also doing today. The way we look at it is that if we have to tell you that you need to watch the keynotes, there’s not much we can do for you.

  • Windows, macOS or Linux, which one to choose [Ed: Relatively shallow article]

    Linux made its name for being an extremely versatile operating system, equipping everything from minicomputers like the Raspberry Pi to datacenters in the cloud, through devices that are in our daily lives, such as smart TVs, routers, thermostats, and the like, without even being suspicious. But what about home and personal use? How does the penguin system fare? The main difference between Linux in relation to Windows and macOS is that it is an open-source system. Therefore, it can be modified and improved by anyone who wants to collaborate on the project or make their own distribution. It is due to this characteristic that we see the system being implemented for so many purposes.

Open Hardware and GNU/Linux Devices

  • ESP32 Clock Pushes Outrun Graphics Over Composite | Hackaday

    We’ve covered plenty of clocks powered by the ESP32, but this one from [Marcio Teixeira] is really something special. Rather than driving a traditional physical display, the microcontroller is instead generating a composite video signal of an animated digital clock. This could be fed into whatever device you wish, but given the 80’s synthwave style it’s pumping out, you’ll probably want to find a suitably retro CRT to do it justice.

  • The Quadrivium EnsembleBot Is A Labour Of Love

    The Quadrivium EnsembleBot project is a mashup between old school musical instruments and the modern MIDI controlled world. Built by a small team over several years, these hand crafted instruments look and sound really nice. [...] This project is by no means unique, lately we’ve covered controlling a church organ with MIDI, as well as a neat Arduino Orchestra, but the EnsembleBot is just so much more.

  • Common Sense – using the Raspberry Pi Sense HAT on Ubuntu Impish Indri | Ubuntu

    Dave Jones from the Canonical Raspberry Pi team has put together a helpful guide for those getting started with the Raspberry Pi Sense HAT on Ubuntu Impish Indri. We’ve reproduced an edited version below, or you can read the full post on his blog along with other great Raspberry Pi tips!

  • Wheeled payload robot can control elevators

    SLAMTEC’s wheeled “Hermes” robot runs Android on an RK3399 and can carry up to 16 kg payloads. The autonomous bot includes 360° Lidar, depth cameras, WiFi and 4G links, a 7.5-hour battery, and an elevator controller.

  • RK3399-based programmable wheeled robot works across multiple floors

    Powered by a Rockchip RK3399 mainboard, the Hermes robot platform supports autonomous path-finding, robot collaboration, cross-floor delivery, smart obstacle avoidance, safety features, and autonomous Recharging. It can be controlled with a REST API, programmed with C++ SDK, or a program called RoboStudio available for Windows and Android.

Kernel and Graphics: Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA

  • Intel teases 'software-defined silicon' with Linux kernel contribution – and won't say why

    Intel has teased a new tech it calls "Software Defined Silicon" (SDSi) but is saying almost nothing about it – and has told The Register it could amount to nothing. SDSi popped up around three weeks ago in a post to the Linux Kernel mailing list, in which an Intel Linux software engineer named David Box described it as "a post-manufacturing mechanism for activating additional silicon features".

  • RadeonSI Lands Another "Very Large" Optimization To Further Boost SPECViewPerf - Phoronix

    In recent months we have seen a lot of RadeonSI optimizations focused on SPECViewPerf with AMD seemingly trying to get this open-source OpenGL driver into very capable shape moving forward for workstation GL workloads. Hitting Mesa 22.0-devel today is yet another round of patches for tuning SPECViewPerf.

  • Vendors Including NVIDIA Talk Up New OpenCL Extensions For Vulkan Interop, NN Inference - Phoronix

    Last Friday night we spotted OpenCL 3.0.9 with several new extensions included. Today The Khronos Group is formally announcing these latest OpenCL additions focused on Vulkan interoperability as well as neural network inferencing. These new extensions for OpenCL 3.0 include an integer dot product extension for neural network inferencing (cl_khr_integer_dot_product) with a focus on 8-bit integer support.

  • RadeonSI Enables NGG Shader Culling For Navi 1x Consumer GPUs - Phoronix

    As another possible performance win for RadeonSI Gallium3D as AMD's open-source Radeon OpenGL driver on Linux systems is enabling of NGG culling for Navi 1x consumer graphics processors rather than limiting it only to newer Navi 2x (RDNA2) GPUs. Merged on Monday was a patch to enable shader culling for Navi 1x consumer SKUs with no longer limiting it to Navi 2x / GFX10.3 or when using various debug options. This culling was also enabled for Navi 1x GPUs but only for the "Pro" graphics SKUs.