Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5+ - Updating experiences

Filed under
Ubuntu

I'm writing about how Ubuntu handled an automatic update the week of March 5, 2007. These days the process of keeping your system up to date has evolved considerably so that it is very easy to stay current with fixes and security updates. Essentially your distribution runs a background process with an associated desktop applet that keeps tabs on any updates to your distribution, and alerts you when updates are available. You can then determine if you wish to install them or not. The most important reason for having this feature is security upgrades. Windows in particular has made the importance of this feature quite clear over the years.

Upgrading is not always straight forward. Again, Windows proves the point, most notably with XP SP2. Linux distributions have also had upgrade issues along the way. In Ubuntu's case there is the notable failure during an upgrade of xorg.core in Ubuntu 6.06 that broke the X desktop. Early last week Update Manager presented 17 new updates, three of them related to X11: x11-common, xorg, and xserver-xorg.

More Here.

Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5+ - Some updated items

As mentioned prior to this, there were a lot of updates coming down the wire this past week; nearly 200 by my count landed on my system. One of the bigger updates was with OpenOffice. It seems to have promoted the OO version number up to 2.2.0. This is even higher than that posted on the OpenOffice website.

I've opened up Writer, Calc, and Impress. Note the version number in the about dialog. The documents being displayed are found in the Examples folder in your Ubuntu home directory.

More Here.

Very strange

Apparently it is no reason for concern though...

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=mozclient&num=50&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&q=openoffice+2%2E2

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Comparing live version upgrade methods

When I review a distribution I always begin by performing a fresh installation of the operating system. This gives the latest version of the project a chance to stand on its own without complications. However, many of us do not perform fresh installations on our operating systems each time we want to upgrade to the latest release. Some of us, in order to preserve settings or installed packages, prefer to upgrade our existing operating system without starting over from scratch. This week I decided to take five open source operating systems through an upgrade process from their penultimate release to their latest version. Read more

Porteus Kiosk 4.0 Modular Linux Web Kiosk Released, Drops Chrome 32-bit Support

Porteus Solutions' Tomasz Jokiel announced on May 30, 2016, the release of the final Porteus Kiosk 4.0.0 Web Kiosk operating system based on the latest GNU/Linux technologies and open-source software. Porteus Kiosk 4.0.0 comes three months after the release of the last maintenance build in the Porteus Kiosk 3.x series, introducing numerous new features and improvements. But first, let's take a quick look under the hood, as the OS is now powered by Linux kernel 4.4.11 LTS (Long Term Support), and it's based on the Mozilla Firefox 45.1.1 ESR and Google Chrome 50.0.2661.102 web browsers. Read more

Fresh 10-Way GeForce Linux Benchmarks With The NVIDIA 367.18 Driver

In prepping for our forthcoming GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 Linux benchmarking, I've been running fresh rounds of benchmarks on my large assortment of GPUs, beginning with the GeForce hardware supported by the NVIDIA 367.18 beta driver. Here are the first of those benchmarks with the ten Maxwell/Kepler GPUs I've tested thus far. Earlier this month I posted the With Pascal Ahead, A 16-Way Recap From NVIDIA's 9800 GTX To Maxwell but in still waiting for my GTX 1070/1080 samples to arrive, I've restarted all of those tests now using the newer 367.18 driver as well as incorporating some extra tests like the recently released F1 2015 for Linux, not having done any SHOC OpenCL tests in a while, etc. Read more

Arch Linux-Based ArchAssault Ethical Hacking Distro Changes Name to ArchStrike

The team over at ArchAssault, a GNU/Linux operating system based on the famous Arch Linux distro and designed for ethical hackers, announced a few minutes ago on their Twitter account that they are changing the OS' name to ArchStrike. Designed from the ground up as a security layer to Arch Linux, the ArchAssault project provides security researchers and hackers with one of the most powerful open source and totally free Linux kernel-based operating system for penetration testing and security auditing operations. Read more