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Should Google acquire Open Office?

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Google

I think there could be a lot of benefits to both parties if Open Office were to work along side the Google Docs team. Now I’m not talking about Google buying Open Office; instead I’m talking about Google hiring some programmers to work on the Open Office application and help integrate the two. I know this is going to cause some controversy, but just hear me out.

First off, if the project remained under a GPL license then Open Office would just be gaining more developers. Sure Google would also help steer Open Office. But Google is very good at working with other companies after merging. And I think Google does a very good job with its own software and their products just seem to work. And that’s what really matters.

Full Story.

Won't happen

First thing, the license is not GPL, it's LGPL.
In any case, nobody said google developers cannot contribute to openoffice. Any person on earth can contribute to openoffice. Google is already free to work on openoffice.
This in a bit ignorant from the author of the article (Digital Ninja) in my humble opinion.

re: Won't happen

If only he would write a "open letter" to Sergey, it might happen!

Sergey

Sergey said that Google would not be working on an office suite. That was almost 2 years ago.

re: Sergey

Yeah, that was sarcasm as I've posted before that "Open Letters" have as much chance at influencing corporate policy as does a "magic 8 ball" (as in none).

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