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Fedora, Red Hat and SUSE

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  • Fedora IoT becomes an edition

    The Fedora 33 release is currently scheduled for late October; as part of the process of designing this release, the deadline for system-wide change proposals was set for June 30. This release already has a substantial number of big changes in the works, so one might be forgiven for being surprised by a system-wide change proposal that appeared on August 4, which looks to be pre-approved. Not only that, but this proposal expands the small set of official Fedora "editions" by adding the relatively obscure Fedora Internet of Things Edition.

    The Fedora distribution is released in a number of forms, including a fair number of "Fedora spins" that skew the distribution toward a specific use case. The flagship Fedora products, though, are the editions, of which there are currently only two: Fedora Workstation and Fedora Server. The former is obviously aimed at desktop deployments, while the latter is meant to be useful on back-end systems. This set of editions has been stable for some time.

    There are a few "emerging editions" in the works, including Fedora CoreOS and Silverblue. Also on that list is Fedora IoT which is now poised to become the third edition to be part of the Fedora 33 release. The proposal notes that this is "largely a paperwork exercise at this point". While the remaining work may be confined to paperwork, the project may want to put some effort into documentation sooner or later; actual information about what Fedora IoT is and how to work with it is relatively hard to find.

    [...]

    One other significant difference with Fedora IoT is a relatively strong focus on the use of containers to install applications. The podman tool is provided for this purpose; it's meant to look a lot like Docker, but without the need for any background daemons. Podman comes configured to pull images from docker.io by default. Your editor attempted to use it to install a few versions of NetHack that must all surely be legitimate, but none of them consented to run correctly — thus saving your editor a considerable amount of wasted time.

    Beyond those changes, though, Fedora IoT feels much like any other Fedora system. The commands work in the same way, and the usual packages are available. This makes for a relatively rich and comfortable environment for embedded-systems work.

    One can't help wonder about the ultimate objective, though. Fedora comes with no support guarantees, a fact that is sure to give pause to any companies thinking about which operating system to install in their million-device products. If Fedora is to have any chance of being deployed in such systems, some sort of commercial support option will have to materialize. When that happens, it may well go under the name of "Red Hat IoT" or some such. Fedora itself may not make it onto all of those devices, but Fedora users will have played with the technology first and helped to make it better.

  • Open source: the pathway to innovation

    Open source technology has seen widespread adoption over the past ten to fifteen years as organisations cross-industry have caught on to its undeniable benefits.

    As the largest open source company in the world, at Red Hat, we believe in the power of open source and its ability, from both a software and cultural perspective, to push the boundaries of technological capabilities. Here’s why.

    [...]

    Open source software is by definition ‘open’, offering companies full visibility and transparency of the code – this means bugs and defects can be identified much more quickly than in proprietary software, leading to enhanced security. As Linus Torvalds, the founder of the open source operating system Linux, once said: “given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow”.

    Secondly, it doesn’t include many of the costs associated with proprietary software, such as licensing fees – this is a big perk for businesses, allowing them to significantly reduce operating costs. Then there is the added cost of wanting to switch to a different software provider down the line; using open source software helps to avoid the pitfall of getting locked into using an expensive proprietary vendor.

    Open source also enables companies to better customise their software. Unlike proprietary software that is developed within the four walls of the company and based on limited input, open source software is typically better tailored to the customers’ needs, as the users themselves can add their preferred features while the technology is in development.

    [...]

    Female contributors are definitely becoming more widely recognised. And even though there is still more work to be done, throughout my career I’ve encountered more women in the context of open source than in proprietary software, and I’ve witnessed more inclusive meritocracy within open source companies. Besides the fact that open thinking is an essential part of supplementing the open source, open communities, by their design, make it much easier for individuals from all backgrounds to participate, have a voice, and share their experience and skills.

    It’s been proven time and again that the more diversity you can bring to a project, the better the outcome is, as you’re benefitting from a greater variety of perspectives, ideas and experience. For this reason, I’d argue that open source is both the fastest and most inclusive way to innovate.

  • Collaboration integral to operations, Red Hat CFO says

    When the pandemic hit, CFO Laurie Krebs, with other function leaders at open-source operating system company Red Hat, created a war room to respond to customers' deferral requests and other payment concessions.

    "Our premier product is an operating system, so, [for that to] go dark is not an option for a lot of customers," Krebs said.

    Rather than create a single playbook, the team approached each request on a case-by-case basis. "To some people, cash is important," she said. "To other people, holding onto their subscription is important."

    The war room's collaborative approach, in which representatives from sales, sales operations, technical accounting and business finance weighed requests as a team, defines how the company approaches all of its policymaking, said Krebs, who took over as CFO last year after serving as vice president of global tax.

  • Want to make better decisions? Encourage disagreement

    Dissent is incredibly important to successful open decision making. When you're seeking collaboration on an important decision, you don't want to be surrounded by people who always agree with everything you say. You already know everything that you're saying and what you believe to be the best path forward. However, you also know (or should know) that your knowledge, experience, and visibility of the entire picture is limited. What you really need are perspectives from people with knowledge, experience, and visibility complementary to yours. That helps round out your perspective—people who will bring up something that you didn't think of or didn't fully comprehend its importance.

    In this article, I'll explore in more depth the importance of dissension during decision making. I'll present a compilation of ideas from a number of my colleagues (at Red Hat), which arose in an open forum discussion we had on the subject.

    [...]

    When presenting an idea and asking for opinions in a meeting, plenty more great ideas and perspectives may be left unsaid. How can we unleash the power that this potential represents?

    [...]

    Using this method can empower your group to fully explore various ways to achieve their objectives. It should present decision makers with all available perspectives and enable them to make the decision that is best for the group.

    Best of all, since they've been included in a decision making process, the entire group will feel ownership over the decision and passionately work to implement and execute it.

  • Here’s What’s .NEXT for Nutanix and SUSE

    Let’s start by stating the obvious. At SUSE, we’re passionate about advancing open source technology to provide better customer outcomes. While that ethos is at the core of SUSE’s business, the truth is that many of our partners embrace that same passion, and work with SUSE to deliver better experiences for their own customers and end users.

  • Adapting for Hybrid Cloud – Part 3 of 3: The Results

    Most enterprises today are pursuing a hybrid strategy, mixing and matching public and on-prem venues depending on each workload’s requirements. One of the issues facing enterprises with hybrid today is the difference in pricing and procurement models. For public cloud, on-demand operating expense pricing is pretty mainstream, and this on-demand access to huge capacity is one of the key drivers behind public cloud adoption, driving more rapid instantiation of resources, allowing the scaling of applications to suit changing demands, making innovation easier and simplifying entry into new markets.

  • SLES for SAP Applications 15 SP2: What’s New and What’s Next

More in Tux Machines

Linux Weekly Roundup: Edge for Linux, Ubuntu Groovy Release, KDE Plasma 5.20.1 and more

A lot happened this week in the Linux world as a whole. Microsoft Edge browser is released for Linux, Ubuntu 20.10 released with associated flavours and a bunch of application updates as well. Read the stories below. Read more

today's leftovers

     
  • Russians Who Pose Election Threat Have Hacked Nuclear Plants and Power Grid
                     
                       

    Officials at San Francisco International Airport discovered Russia’s state [attackers] had breached the online system that airport employees and travelers used to gain access to the airport’s Wi-Fi. The [attackers] injected code into two Wi-Fi portals that stole visitors’ user names, cracked their passwords and infected their laptops.

  •                
  • Psychotherapy centre data breach victims receive extortion emails [iophk: Windows TCO
                     
                       

    ]As well as their personal data, the extortionist told them that records of their discussions with therapists would be published.

                       

    It is not known whether the extortionist is the same individual or group that [cracked] the data in the first place.

                       

    Individual emails were sent on Saturday evening, with [YLE] receiving messages from 8pm onwards. All the victims described receiving the same message.

    The extortionist wrote that recipients must pay 200 euros within 24 hours, or if they don't meet that deadline, 500 euros within 48 hours.

  • Datacamp Review - CodersLegacy

    Datacamp is a very well known online learning platform for programmers. It aims to teach a variety of different languages and topics through the use of videos, text and exercises. In this review we’ll be attempting to cover everything about Datacamp, from it’s format to it’s user complaints to it’s good points. Whether Datacamp is worth the time and money, will be clear to you by the end of this review.

  • Why I wrote 152 extra lines of code just to do the same thing (and why I’d do it again today)

    Who else remembers printing out code on a dot matrix printer? Ah, those were the days… (Image courtesy Arnold Reinhold.)

  • YottaDB Announces Octo 1.0, a YottaDB Plugin for Using SQL to Query Data in YottaDB

    YottaDB, the database for transactional systems where data integrity is paramount, today announced production-grade Octo 1.0, a YottaDB plugin to query YottaDB application data using popular SQL tools. YottaDB excels for transactional systems, where data integrity and application robustness are paramount – applications that effect database state change to provide mission-critical functionality, such as electronic health record systems, core banking systems, library systems, and election systems.

    There is a vast ecosystem of tools using SQL/JDBC for reporting, visualization, analysis, and more. Octo 1.0 makes databases of transactional applications that use YottaDB, accessible to those tools.

  • Introducing Octo

    Octo is a YottaDB plugin for using SQL to query data that is persisted in YottaDB’s key-value tuples (global variables).

    Conforming to YottaDB’s standard for plugins, Octo is installed in the $ydb_dist/plugin sub-directory with no impact on YottaDB or existing applications. In addition to YottaDB itself, Octo requires the YottaDB POSIX plugin. The popularity of SQL has produced a vast ecosystem of tools for reporting, visualization, analysis, and more. Octo opens the door to using these tools with the databases of transactional applications that use YottaDB.

  • About me and my life ...: Fedora 31 : Can be better? part 006.

    I try to use the Selinux MLS with Fedora 31 and I wrote on my last article about Fedora 31 : Can be better? part 005.After relabeling the files and start the environment I get multiple errors and I ask an answer at fedoraproject lists:This is an example of the problem of implementing MLS in Fedora and can be remedied because MLS Selinux is old in implementing Selinux.

  • How To Install HPLIP on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install HPLIP on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, HPLIP (HP Linux Imaging and Printing Driver) developed by HP for Printing, scanning, and faxing with HP inkjet and laser-based printers in Linux platforms. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of HP Linux Image and Printing on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Putting open values into management practice

    Allison has a unique perspective on the practice of managing with open values because she was familiar with working in an open organization before becoming a manager, and therefore needed to learn how to practice the values differently as she transitioned to a manager role at Red Hat. That was “easier said than done,” as she put it during our discussion, because of a manager's responsibilities for helping and coaching individuals on their team, specifically regarding performance and development. Allison manages a team focused on internal communications, where associates have a variety of unique responsibilities and work on different tasks rather than collaborate on a single deliverable. This makes both the sharing of knowledge and the use of knowledge toward an innovative goal of primary importance. Because of that, she feels she is not a "boss"—not someone who directs work— but rather "just another member of the team" who "sets the context in which works take place." She feels she is not a "boss"—not someone who directs work— but rather "just another member of the team" who "sets the context in which works take place."

  • Chrome OS finally has a dark mode, and you can try it right now

    While Windows and macOS users have been enjoying their flavors of dark mode for quite some time now, Chrome OS users have sadly been missing out on the fun. However, thanks to a recent sighting by Android Police on the Chrome OS Canary channel, it looks like Chrome OS users can now join in on the dark mode hype train. We reported back in September that Google has been internally working on proper dark and light themes for Chrome OS. The system-wide feature is still in its early development stages and is not officially ready to come to the Stable channel yet, but if you have a Chromebook and are itching to start using the upcoming feature today, you can do just that by going into the Flags menu on Chrome.

GNU Taler news: RFC 8905 - "The 'payto' URI Scheme for Payments" published

We are happy to announce the publication of RFC 8905 by the IETF. RFC 8905 defines the 'payto' Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) scheme for designating targets for payments. A unified URI scheme for all payment target types allows applications to offer user interactions with URIs that represent payment targets, simplifying the introduction of new payment systems and applications. Read more

It's Time To Admit It: The X.Org Server Is Abandonware

The last major release of the X.Org Server was in May 2018 but don't expect the long-awaited X.Org Server 1.21 to actually be released anytime soon. This should hardly be surprising but a prominent Intel open-source developer has conceded that the X.Org Server is pretty much "abandonware" with Wayland being the future. This comes as X.Org Server development hits a nearly two decade low, the X.Org Server is well off its six month release regiment in not seeing a major release in over two years, and no one is stepping up to manage the 1.21 release. A year ago was a proposal to see new releases driven via continuous integration testing but even that didn't take flight and as we roll into 2021 there isn't any motivation for releasing new versions of the X.Org Server by those capable of doing so. Read more