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Ubuntu Community Council and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

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Ubuntu
  • Mark Shuttleworth to revive Ubuntu Community Council after body shrinks to single member – Mark Shuttleworth

    Canonical founder and CEO Mark Shuttleworth said yesterday that he will revive the defunct Community Council amid complaints that the volunteer Ubuntu community has been neglected.

    In theory, the Ubuntu Community Council plays a key role in the governance of the project, setting the code of conduct, resolving disputes, and managing nominations and elections for other Ubuntu boards and councils.

  • Stephen Michael Kellat: Middle of September 2020 Notes

    I also have taken time to test the Groovy Gorilla ISOs for Xubuntu. I encourage everybody out there to visit the testing tracker to test disc images for Xubuntu and other flavours as we head towards the release of 20.10 next month. Every release needs as much testing as possible.

    Based upon an article from The Register it appears that the Community Council is being brought back to life. Nominations are being sought per a post on the main Discourse instance but readers of this are reminded that you need to be a current member either directly or indirectly of the 609 Ubuntu Members shown on Launchpad. Those 609 persons are the electors for the Community Council and the Community Council is drawn from that group. The size and composition of the Ubuntu Members group on Launchpad can change based upon published procedures and the initiative of individual to be part of such changes.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 648

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 648 for the week of September 6 – 12, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

"Shuttleworth makes peace with Ubuntu Linux community"

  • Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth makes peace with Ubuntu Linux community

    Of the three major Linux companies, Canonical, Red Hat, and SUSE, two have separate community Linux distros: Red Hat with Fedora, and SUSE with openSUSE. While in both cases these distros are closely tied with their corporate releases, their community of fans and developers have a say in their direction. With Canonical, though, and Ubuntu Linux, there's only the one distribution.

Call for Ubuntu Community Council nominations

  • Call for Ubuntu Community Council nominations

    As you may have noticed, the Ubuntu Community Council has been vacant for a while. Happily, a decision has recently been made to repopulate it. Thus, this official announcement for nominations.

    We will be filling all seven seats this term, with terms lasting two years. To be eligible, a nominee must be an Ubuntu Member. Ideally, they should have a vast understanding of the Ubuntu community, be well-organized, and be a natural leader.

    The work of the Community Council, as it stands, is to uphold the Code of Conduct throughout the community, ensure that all the other leadership boards and council are running smoothly, and to ensure the general health of the community, including not only supporting contributors but also stepping in for dispute resolution, as needed.

    Historically, there would be two meetings per month, so the nominee should be willing to commit, at minimum, to that particular time requirement. Additionally, as needs arise, other communication, most often by email, will happen. The input of the entire Council is essential for swift and appropriate actions to get enacted, so participation in these conversations should be expected.

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More in Tux Machines

Announcing NetBSD 9.1

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 9.1, the first update of the NetBSD 9 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons, as well as new features and enhancements. Read more Also: NetBSD 9.1 Released With Parallelized Disk Encryption, Better ZFS, X11 Improvements

today's howtos

  • Btrfs on CentOS: Living with Loopback | Linux Journal

    The btrfs filesystem has taunted the Linux community for years, offering a stunning array of features and capability, but never earning universal acclaim. Btrfs is perhaps more deserving of patience, as its promised capabilities dwarf all peers, earning it vocal proponents with great influence. Still, none can argue that btrfs is unfinished, many features are very new, and stability concerns remain for common functions. Most of the intended goals of btrfs have been met. However, Red Hat famously cut continued btrfs support from their 7.4 release, and has allowed the code to stagnate in their backported kernel since that time. The Fedora project announced their intention to adopt btrfs as the default filesystem for variants of their distribution, in a seeming juxtaposition. SUSE has maintained btrfs support for their own distribution and the greater community for many years. For users, the most desirable features of btrfs are transparent compression and snapshots; these features are stable, and relatively easy to add as a veneer to stock CentOS (and its peers). Administrators are further compelled by adjustable checksums, scrubs, and the ability to enlarge as well as (surprisingly) shrink filesystem images, while some advanced btrfs topics (i.e. deduplication, RAID, ext4 conversion) aren't really germane for minimal loopback usage. The systemd init package also has dependencies upon btrfs, among them machinectl and systemd-nspawn. Despite these features, there are many usage patterns that are not directly appropriate for use with btrfs. It is hostile to most databases and many other programs with incompatible I/O, and should be approached with some care.

  • How To List Filesystems In Linux Using Lfs - OSTechNix

    Lfs is a commandline tool used to list filesystems in Linux system. Lfs is slightly a better alternative to "df -H" command.

  • How to Install Debian Linux 10.5 with MATE Desktop + VMware Tools on VMware Workstation - SysAdmin

    This video tutorial shows how to install Debian Linux 10.5 with MATE Desktop on VMware Workstation step by step.

  • How to Install Mageia Linux 7.1 + VMware Tools on VMware Workstation - SysAdmin

    This video tutorial shows how to install Mageia Linux 7.1 on VMware Workstation step by step.

  • How to install Krita 4.3.0 on Deepin 20 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Krita 4.3.0 on Deepin 20.

  • How to install PHP 7.4 in Ubuntu 20.04? | LibreByte

    PHP-FPM is used together with a web server like Apache or NGINX, PHP-FPM serves dynamic content, while the web server serve static content

  • How to install the Blizzard Battle.net on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install the Blizzard Battle.net on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install the MGT GTK theme on Linux

    MGT is a modern theme that is based on the Materia GTK theme. It comes in 4 different colors (Grey, Semi-Dark, Light, and Dark) and brings the Google Material Design look that many Linux users love. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install the MGT GTK theme on Linux.

  • How to install the RavenDB NoSQL database on Ubuntu 20.04 - TechRepublic

    If you're looking to deploy a powerful NoSQL database on Linux, let Jack Wallen walk you through the process of installing RavenDB.

  • Implementing a self-signed certificate on an Ubuntu Server > Tux-Techie

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to create a self-signed certificate with OpenSSL on an Ubuntu 20.04 server and discuss its use cases.

Graphics: Mesa, Vulkan and AMD

  • Mesa Just Got A Significant Performance Boost For Intel Tiger Lake Chips

    Intel's Kenneth Graunke has written a few patches for Intel Gen12+ graphics chips that boost graphics performance by one to twelve percent. Don't get too excited, it only applies to Intel Tigerlake and newer and they won't arrive in mainstream GNU/Linux distributions until Mesa 20.3 is released mid-December.

  • The Vulkan driver for Raspberry Pi 4 becomes official for Linux, merged into Mesa | GamingOnLinux

    In case you've missed what's been going on, the progress on proper Vulkan support for the Raspberry Pi 4 has been going really well. So well in fact, that it's been merged into the upstream Mesa project and so it's all a bit more official. Writing in a guest post on the official Raspberry Pi blog, Igalia's Iago Toral, who has been largely responsible for hacking away on the v3dv driver gave an update on the progress. [...] Plenty more still to be done, and as they said, passing tests is one thing but real-world use is another. I've no doubt people will find many ways to break it while it's still in development. That's part of the point of being official in Mesa now though, makes it vastly easy to try it. As a proud owner of a Raspberry Pi 4, it's going to be fun to see it in action with Vulkan now.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 Is Released With A New Vulkan Extension And Three Game-Specific Fixes - LinuxReviews

    AMD has released a new version of their AMDVLK Vulkan driver for Linux with support for one new Vulkan extensions and game-specific fixes for Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, Second Extinction and X-plane. Performance is still overall worse than the AMD RAVD Vulkan driver that comes with Mesa 20.2.0 and performance is much worse in specific graphics benchmarks and image up-scaling. [...] AMDVLK's performance has long been sub-par compared to Mesa's RADV driver. That's the driver GNU/Linux distributions ship with, AMDVLK is optional. AMDVLK is much closer to the Windows-driver than Mesa's RADV and compatibility may be a reason to install the latest and greatest AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 driver. Performance is, as you will see if you read on, not a reason to install it.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 Released With Various Game Fixes - Phoronix

    AMD has issued their first open-source Vulkan driver code drop of the quarter with AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1. The main changes of AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 are updating against the Vulkan API 1.2.156 revision and enabling support for VK_EXT_shader_image_atomic_int64. VK_EXT_shader_image_atomic_int64 allows for 64-bit integer atomic operations to work on images.

Games: Humble Bundle, Stadia, Amnesia: Rebirth, Steam Proton

  • Get some thrills on in the latest Humble Bundle with DUSK and Detention | GamingOnLinux

    Need to boost your library ready for Halloween? Humble Bundle are back with some cheap thrills for you. As usual, we will highlight those with Linux support / Linux builds in bold text to make it easy at a glance.

  • Stadia gets PAC-MAN 64-player Battle Royale, Jedi: Fallen Order soon and HUMANKIND beta | GamingOnLinux

    When Google started hyping up three days of announcements and demos, it has probably disappointed many that the first day was PAC-MAN. That's right, after Stadia got an exclusive Bomberman Battle Royale, it's now getting PAC-MAN Mega Tunnel Battle, a 64-player last-pac standing game. There's a demo available right now, which anyone can register for a Stadia account to hop in and try it (Stadia Pro not needed). Surprisingly, it's actually pretty good. Sounds like it might be Stadia exclusive at release too on November 17.

  • The latest horror from Frictional Games with Amnesia: Rebirth is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Frictional Games have now released their latest horror title with Amnesia: Rebirth, as you walk in the shoes of Tasi and guide them through an emotional experience. Using the same game engine as their previous game SOMA, which they call HPL3, Amnesia: Rebirth is a horror game that focuses on the journey as much as the end. It's all about the narrative and sinking into the thick atmosphere, Frictional say to not go in aiming to beat it but rather to immerse yourself in the world. Rebirth has a direct connection to Amnesia: The Dark Descent, however it's a fully stand-alone experience so you don't actually need to have played any others.

  • Steam Proton Updated To 5.13 Making Red Dead Redemption 2 Playable On Linux

    Linux users are simply some of the most stubborn users in the world, willing to forgo almost any convenience in exchange for keeping themselves both secure, and in absolute control of their operating system. Whereas Microsoft has attempted to further dummy-proof Windows 10 (bringing about a disastrous ‘software as a service’ routine with consistent updates and changes to everything with little to no warning), Linux is on the far other end of the spectrum where files and configurations rely a bit more on the user understand what they’re doing, rather than intelligent installers doing the necessary heavy lifting. If it’s a toss-up between the two, Linux is strongly recommended for the more tech-savvy users. If you’re keener, however, to ensure that you can play all of the latest games and popular tools, then Windows is likely the answer even with its arguably draconian policies and bloat-ware shoveling.