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How to Enable and Disable Ubuntu Root Password

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HowTos

Ubuntu is one of the few Linux distributions out there that will not enable the root account.If you want to do something with root permission on the console you have to type sudo before the command.

sudo" means superuser do. "sudo" will prompt for "Password:". Please specify user password

As you have noticed during the Ubuntu installation there was no question about the root password, as you might have been used to see during other Linux distribution installation process.Because of this your root accout is inactive.

If you want to enable root account (which is not recommended) enter the following command.

Full Story.

re: ubuntu

the article wrote:

"If you want to enable root account (which is not recommended) enter the following command."

Beware the danger of root. According to the Ubuntu fan club, root IS the root of all evil. Therefore it's truly amazing that all those Unix guru's (you know, the white beard crowd) has survived (nay prospered) over the last 30 years while playing with fire.

Maybe if the Ubuntu bunch stopped treating their users like blathering idiots, they'd gain some street cred in the Linux community (who have also survived the perils of that oh so tricky root account).

re: ubuntu & root

I know what you mean, that statement kinda gave me pause too. I can't believe that's becoming the new sage advice. I remember in our day it was, "don't login as root, su to root." Big Grin Then there was the big conflict of su vs. su -. Now new users are being advised not to use it at all?

Oh yeah cuz letting just any tom, dick, and harry that walks up (or hacks in) to your computer complete any administrative task by issuing sudo before the command... yeah, that's safer.

On a serious note, what can't you do using sudo? why is it being advised over su?

Remember when sudo was used very sparingly and with great consideration?

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