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Games: Delores: A Thimbleweed Park Mini-Adventure, Graywalkers: Purgatory and Lots More

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Gaming
  • Crusader Kings 3 System requirements: can you run it on your PC or Mac?

    Crusader Kings 3 is out on PC, Mac, and Steam OS/Linux. According to the game’s Steam page, you’ll need to have a certain level of machine to run Crusader Kings 3. We’ll keep you updated as things change too – the Crusader Kings series is famous for its huge DLC content drops throughout the game’s life span, and there’s always the chance one of these makes the game more intense to run.

    [...]

    Crusader Kings 3 Steam OS/Linux requirements

    Running CK3 on Linux or Steam OS? Here’s what you’ll need at minimum.

    OS – Ubuntu 18.04

  • Delores: A Thimbleweed Park Mini-Adventure now available for Linux

    After a short Beta testing period, it seems Delores: A Thimbleweed Park Mini-Adventure is now out properly for Linux from developer Ron Gilbert and Terrible Toybox.

    What is it? Delores: A Thimbleweed Park Mini-Adventure started out as a prototype for Ron Gilbert's new point-and-click adventure game engine and grew into a fun little game. Don't think of it as a sequel to Thimbleweed Park, as it's not, it's a mini-adventure for fans who want a little bit more. It's also free!

  • Supernatural post-apocalyptic turn-based strategy Graywalkers: Purgatory is now on Linux

    With its XCOM-like combat and a setting that merges together the supernatural with post-apocalyptic themes, Graywalkers: Purgatory is now available for Linux.

    "Graywalkers: Purgatory is a stylish turn-based strategy RPG set in a supernatural post-apocalyptic world where Heaven and Hell had merged with Earth caused by a event called the Rupture. Inspired by a combination of gameplay from XCom, Jagged Alliance and Fallout, the game generates a unique but familiar experience for the turn-based tactics player."

  • Enjoy the classic Unreal Tournament on modern platforms with OldUnreal - new update out

    OldUnreal release 469 is out now with tons of bug fixes for this classic. It's a long list, with plenty of attention given to the Linux version too.

  • Driving with on-screen controls in Frick, Inc. looks hilarious - releasing October 10

    Frick, Inc. has you use on-screen controls to drive funny little trucks across short, challenging little maps and it looks simply wonderful and also as the name suggests - probably frick-ing frustrating.

    Each truck has a different control layout, so it will continue to mess with you as you progress through it and you'll be doing all this button pressing and lever pulling across 30 varied levels. Once you've really got the controls down, each level also has an additional added challenge you can do.

  • Antimatter is a very ambitious upcoming galaxy-wide exploration city-builder

    Top marks for ambition on this one, as Antimatter from developer Geoffroy Pirard is planned to be a 4x city-builder where you can explore space and colonize many other planets.

    It doesn't seem to really fit into a few standard genres. Is it a city-builder? Yes. Is it a game of space exploration? Seemingly also yes. The developer explains how each planet can be explored and built up with different biomes, native cities, hidden structures, forgotten civilisations and more surprises to find. Not always peaceful either, some planets as expected are quite dangerous places to be exploring.

  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs go open source

    Frictional Games have announced that they've now open source the game engine behind Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs as open source under the GPL.

    It's worth noting, that like a lot of open source releases this is only the code and not all the other media assets. A great way to do it, as the original developer earns their monies as people need to buy it to run it but it can be kept alive for generations to come, ported to new platforms and more. Frictional are no strangers to open source, as they also put up the HPL1 game engine that powered the Penumbra Series in the same way many years ago.

  • According to The Business Research Company’s research report on the browser games market, Asia Pacific has the largest share, accounting for 51% of the global browser games market size. The browser games market in Asia Pacific is supported by the presence of a lar

More on the GPL move

  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent and A Machine for Pigs are now open source

    Frictional Games has decided to celebrate ten years of Amnesia scaring the crap out of people by letting everyone craft their own horrifying nightmares. From today, Amnesia: The Dark Descent and A Machine for Pigs are open source.

    Released under the GNU General Public License, anyone can tinker away with the game code and editor code for both games, mod it, create something new and even release software built on it commercially—though the terms of the license mean that you'd also have to make it open source as well.

    "Modding has been a huge part of Amnesia," says Thomas Grip, Frictional Games' creative director. "For instance, over the years The Dark Descent has accumulated over 1,000 mods and addons on ModDB [1,056, to be exact]. This flood of user content has been amazing to see, and we are extremely grateful for the whole community. It is time we give something back."

Amnesia: The Dark Descent and A Machine For Pigs out now

  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent and A Machine For Pigs out now as open source

    Frictional Games has announced Amnesia: The Dark Descent and A Machine for Pigs are is now available as open source.

    The code released contains all the game code for both Amnesia: The Dark Descent and A Machine For Pigs. It also contains all editor codes.

    The full source code for Amnesia: The Dark Descent is available under GPL v3 today.

    “Modding has been a huge part of Amnesia,” explains Thomas Grip, creative director at Frictional Games. “For instance, over the years The Dark Descent has accumulated over a thousand mods and addons on ModDB.

Amnesia: The Dark Descent Goes Open Source

  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent Goes Open Source

    Developer Frictional Games has announced that the source code for Amnesia: The Dark Descent is now going open source. The source code for the beloved survival horror game can now be found on Github right here. In addition to the game's code, Frictional Games has also released the sequel, A Machine for Pigs, as well. The decision was made in honor of the game's 10th anniversary. Despite the release of the source code, the title will still be offered for sale through various online retailers. Frictional Games will retain all ownership of the game and its assets, and modders must adhere to the GPL3 license. In a press release, Frictional Games creative director Thomas Grip discussed the decision.

"Interested parties can check out GPL v3..."

  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent and A Machine for Pigs Now Open Source

    Frictional Games has officially announced that two of its terrifying games, Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Amnesia: A Machine For Pigs, are now available as open-source titles. You can procure the source code for both titles, which includes all editor codes as well. Interested parties can check out GPL v3 for the entirety of the code today. It should be a field day for modders to make these titles even scarier than they already are.

    [...]

    Knowing what kind of creative things folks make when it comes to the modding community, this was a very cool first step for making some seriously twisted horror games. The Amnesia games are already about as close to nightmares as you can get. They're actually about "immersion, discovery, and living through a nightmare," according to the official Steam page. If you haven't given them a try just yet, you'll definitely want to do so.

Amnesia is now open source!

  • Amnesia is now open source!

    Modding has been a huge part of Amnesia. For instance, over the years The Dark Descent has accumulated over a thousand mods and addons on ModDB. This flood of user content has been amazing to see and we are extremely grateful for the whole community surrounding it all.

    [...]

    Very important note: This doesn’t mean that the game is suddenly free. It just means that people are free to use the source however they want as long as they adhere to the GPL3 licence. The game and all of its content is still owned by Frictional Games. Just like before.

    Think of the release as “free speech”, not “free beer”.

    It feels like we could have released this source code a long time ago. Unfortunately there has always been something else we had to attend to instead. But now that Amnesia: The Dark Descent has had its 10th anniversary and Amnesia: Rebirth is less than a month away, we just couldn’t wait any longer!

    We are all really excited to see what comes out of it! The modding community has been incredibly creative over the years and it will be fun to see what it can do with the full source code at its disposal.

Frictional Games Has Released Source Code

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