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Mozilla: Firefox for Android Nightly and Surveillance ('Telemetry')

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Moz/FF
  • More Recommended extensions added to Firefox for Android Nightly

    As we mentioned recently, we’re adding Recommended extensions to Firefox for Android Nightly as a broader set of APIs become available to accommodate more add-on functionality. We just updated the collection with some new Recommended extensions, including…

    Mobile favorites Video Background Play Fix (keeps videos playing in the background even when you switch tabs) and Google Search Fixer (mimics the Google search experience on Chrome) are now in the fold.

    Privacy related extensions FoxyProxy (proxy management tool with advanced URL pattern matching) and Bitwarden (password manager) join popular ad blockers Ghostery and AdGuard.

    Dig deeper into web content with Image Search Options (customizable reverse image search tool) and Web Archives (view archived web pages from an array of search engines). And if you end up wasting too much time exploring images and cached pages you can get your productivity back on track with Tomato Clock (timed work intervals) and LeechBlock NG (block time-wasting websites).

  • Jeff Klukas: The Nitty-Gritty of Moving Data with Apache Beam

    In this session, you won’t learn about joins or windows or timers or any other advanced features of Beam. Instead, we will focus on the real-world complexity that comes from simply moving data from one system to another safely. How do we model data as it passes from one transform to another? How do we handle errors? How do we test the system? How do we organize the code to make the pipeline configurable for different source and destination systems?

    We will explore how each of these questions are addressed in Mozilla’s open source codebase for ingesting telemetry data from Firefox clients. By the end of the session, you’ll be equipped to explore the codebase and documentation on your own to see how these concepts are composed together.

  • This Week in Glean: glean-core to Wasm experiment

    On the Glean team we make an effort to move as much of the logic as possible to glean-core, so that we don’t have too much code duplication on the language bindings and guarantee standardized behaviour throughout all platforms.

    Since that is the case, it was counterintuitive for me, that when we set out to build a version of Glean for the web, we wouldn’t rely on the same glean-core as all our other language bindings. The hypothesis was: let’s make JavaScript just another language binding, by making our Rust core compile to a target that runs on the browser.

    Rust is notorious for making an effort to have a great Rust to Wasm experience, and the Rust and Webassembly working group has built awesome tools that make boilerplate for such projects much leaner.

  • Data Publishing @ Mozilla

    Mozilla’s history is steeped in openness and transparency – it’s simply core to what we do and how we see ourselves in the world. We are always looking for ways to bring our mission to life in ways that help create a healthy internet and support the Mozilla Manifesto. One of our commitments says “We are committed to an internet that elevates critical thinking, reasoned argument, shared knowledge, and verifiable facts”.

    To this end, we have spent a good amount of time considering how we can publicly share our Mozilla telemetry data sets – it is one of the most simple and effective ways we can enable collaboration and share knowledge. But, only if it can be done safely and in a privacy protecting, principled way. We believe we’ve designed a way to do this and we are excited to outline our approach here.

    Making data public not only allows us to be transparent about our data practices, but directly demonstrates how our work contributes to our mission. Having a publicly available methodology for vetting and sharing our data demonstrates our values as a company. It will also enable other research opportunities with trusted scientists, analysts, journalists, and policymakers in a way that furthers our efforts to shape an internet that benefits everyone.

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today's howtos

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    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install HAProxy on your CentOS 8. For those of you who didn’t know, HAProxy is a free HTTP/TCP high availability load balancer and proxy server. It spreads requests among multiple servers to mitigate issues resulting from a single server failure. HA Proxy is used by a number of high-profile websites including GitHub, Bitbucket, Stack Overflow, Reddit, Tumblr, Twitter, and Tuenti, and is used in the OpsWorks product from Amazon Web Services. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation HAProxy on a CentOS 8.

  • How To Install Python 3.9 on Ubuntu 20.04 – TecAdmin

    Python is an object-oriented, high-level programming language. It is an open source with a large community. Python is used as key languages among the top tech companies like Google. The Python 3.9 stable version has been released with several improvements and security updates. It included multiple new modules, improved existing modules and many other features. You can choose deadsnakes PPA for Python installation on Ubuntu 20.04 system. Use this tutorial to install Python 3.9 On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Linux system via Apt-Get. You can also choose second method to install Python using source code.

  • YAML for beginners | Enable Sysadmin

    YAML Ain't a Markup Language (YAML), and as configuration formats go, it's easy on the eyes. It has an intuitive visual structure, and its logic is pretty simple: indented bullet points inherit properties of parent bullet points. But this apparent simplicity can be deceptive. It's easy (and misleading) to think of YAML as just a list of related values, no more complex than a shopping list. There is a heading and some items beneath it. The items below the heading relate directly to it, right? Well, you can test this theory by writing a little bit of valid YAML.

  • colorls – turbocharged alternative to ls

    The part of the operating system responsible for managing files and directories is called the file system. It organizes our data into files, which hold information, and directories (also called ‘folders’), which hold files or other directories. Several commands are frequently used to create, inspect, rename, and delete files and directories. One of these commands is ls, which prints the names of the files and directories in the current directory. A directory is really just a file. It’s a special file with special rules. The ls utility appeared in the first version of AT&T UNIX. Are you looking to liven up your shell? Want a bit more beauty on your terminal? colorls might be the ticket. colorls is a command-line utility that aims to improve on ls. color is written in Ruby.

Linux Patches Aim To Provide Fork'ing Brute Force Attack Mitigation

Building off a set of "request for comments" patches from September, a set of patches were sent out on Sunday for providing brute force attack mitigation around the fork system call. With attacks aiming to break Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) and similar attacks often relying on the fork system call in order to keep replicating the memory contents of the parent process, these patches aim to detect the behavior where fork is being exploited for these nefarious purposes. This work is inspired in part by some patches carried by GrSecurity where a delay around the fork system call will be imposed if a child died from a fatal error. These patches propose collecting statistical data shared across all the processes with the same memory contents and analyzing the timing of any children processes crashing. When the code determines such an exploit may be underway leveraging fork, all of the processes using the same memory contents are killed to stop whatever malicious activity may be happening. Read more

Android Leftovers

Manage content using Pulp Debian

Pulp is an open source repository management tool that helps you fetch, mirror, upload, and publish content within your organization. It can be used to manage various types of content such as software packages (from RPM packages to Ruby gems), as well as Ansible collections, container images, and even arbitrary files. A typical workflow starts with fetching software packages from an existing repository (for example, http://mirror.centos.org/centos/7/os/x86_64/) or adding packages manually (for private packages built within your organization). Then Pulp helps you make arbitrary collections of software packages that are consumable by clients. With it, you... Read more