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today's leftovers

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  • 7 Alternatives to Google Earth

    Google Earth has received so much press coverage that many users will appreciate that it is one of the coolest applications to download. In brief, it is a feature-laden 3D virtual globe, map and geography browser which lets users zoom in on their world with fantastic detail. View satellite imagery, maps, terrain, 3D buildings and even explore galaxies in the sky. This application allows the exploration of rich geographical content, save toured places and share with others. The software maps the earth by the superimposition of images obtained from satellite imagery, aerial photography and GIS 3D globe.

    Google Earth is undoubtedly a very impressive application, and it is extremely hard not to admire the wealth of features that it offers. Its satellite images are unrivaled, it provides useful and accurate statistical information, and the software has many practical benefits, such as helping to find locations and give driving directions. In terms of functionality, this application earns our highest praise. We use the software on a regular basis on both desktop and mobile devices (the latter under Android). However, while Google Earth is available to download without charge, Google do not release the software under an open source license.

    In the past there have been attempts to reverse engineer Google Earth and implement its features in an open and extensible way. However, these actions were understandably frowned upon by Google. Instead we prefer to see the development of open source virtual globe software which uses freely licensed or public domain data. While the development of open source virtual globe applications may not, in itself, encourage Google to release its application or data under a similar license, it does give users the option to be able to have the freedom to do what they want. This route also helps to foster greater user community support to drive development often in the form of add-ons and plug-ins.

    There are a number of applications which are credible open source alternatives to Google Earth. While none of the software applications featured in this article have all of the features offered by Google Earth (although some offer some different features), and they are not exactly comparable, they are all worthy of investigating.

  • Warzone 2100 Lands Vulkan Renderer, Adaptive V-Sync For 20+ Year Old Game

    Warzone 2100 as the real-time strategy/tactics game that first premiered in 1999 before becoming open-source in 2004 and then fully open-source with game data in 2008 is now evolving in 2020 with Vulkan graphics support.

    The open-source Warzone 2100 game not only has a Vulkan back-end that was merged today but also OpenGL ES 2.0/3.0 support for those wanting to relive this late 90's computer game on mobile/embedded devices having only GLES drivers.

  • [NetBSD] Curses Library Automated Testing

    My GSoC project under NetBSD involves the development of the test framework of curses. This is the final blog report in a series of blog reports; you can look at the first report and second report of the series.
    The first report gives a brief introduction of the project and some insights into the curses testframe through its architecture and language. To someone who wants to contribute to the test suite, this blog can act as the quick guide of how things work internally. Meanwhile, the second report discusses some of the concepts that were quite challenging for me to understand. I wanted to share them with those who may face such a challenge. Both of these reports also cover the progress made in various phases of the Summer of Code.

    This being the final report in the series, I would love to share my experience throughout the project. I would be sharing some of the learning as well as caveats that I faced in the project.

  • [NetBSD] RumpKernel Syscall Fuzzing

    The first and second coding period was entirely dedicated to fuzzing rumpkernel syscalls using hongfuzz. Initially a dumb fuzzer was developed to start fuzzing but it soon reached its limits.

    For the duration of second coding peroid we concentrated on crash reproduction and adding grammar to the fuzzer which yielded in better results as we tested on a bug in ioctl with grammar. Although this works for now crash reproduction needs to be improved to generate a working c reproducer.

    For the last coding period I have looked into the internals of syzkaller to understand how it pregenerates input and how it mutates data. I have continued to work on integrating buildrump.sh with build.sh. buildrump eases the task fo building the rumpkernel on any host for any target.

    buildrump.sh is like a wrapper around build.sh to build the tools and rumpkernel from the source relevant to rumpkernel. So I worked to get buildrump.sh working with netbsd-src. Building the toolchain was successfull from netbsd-src. So binaries like rumpmake work just fine to continue building the rumpkernel.

  • Full Circle Magazine #161
  • Bandwidth for Video Conferencing

    For the Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) I’ve run video conferences on Jitsi and BBB (see my previous post about BBB vs Jitsi [1]). One issue with video conferences is the bandwidth requirements.

    The place I’m hosting my video conference server has a NBN link with allegedly 40Mb/s transmission speed and 100Mb/s reception speed. My tests show that it can transmit at about 37Mb/s and receive at speeds significantly higher than that but also quite a bit lower than 100Mb/s (around 60 or 70Mb/s). For a video conference server you have a small number of sources of video and audio and a larger number of targets as usually most people will have their microphones muted and video cameras turned off. This means that the transmission speed is the bottleneck. In every test the reception speed was well below half the transmission speed, so the tests confirmed my expectation that transmission was the only bottleneck, but the reception speed was higher than I had expected.

    When we tested bandwidth use the maximum upload speed we saw was about 4MB/s (32Mb/s) with 8+ video cameras and maybe 20 people seeing some of the video (with a bit of lag). We used 3.5MB/s (28Mb/s) when we only had 6 cameras which seemed to be the maximum for good performance.

  • Get involved – Meet the TDF team

    Joining a free and open source software project, such as LibreOffice, is a great way to build your skills, gain experience for future career options, meet new people – and have fun!

    But sometimes, joining a large and well-established project can be a bit daunting at the start. So here we’ll introduce you to the small team at The Document Foundation, the non-profit entity behind LibreOffice. Most team members oversee certain sub-projects in the LibreOffice community – click on their names to learn more in interviews…

  • Emacs Builders (Together with Richard Stallman) Focus on Learn how to Construct a Extra 'Fashionable' Emacs
  • Lack of Qualified Linux Talent Impedes Enterprise Move to the Clouds

    The Linux Foundation has been working to address the shortage of Linux talent for many years with a combination of training and certification exams.

    Despite this, the breathtaking growth in Linux adoption, especially as the de facto OS of the cloud, means that there is still a shortage of qualified talent, according to Clyde Seepersad, senior vice president and general manager for training and certification at The Linux Foundation (LF).

    “We are always supportive of developments in the training ecosystem which help address this gap. In particular, we are finding that demand for our performance-based certification exams continues to be gated by individuals not feeling adequately prepared,” he told LinuxInsider.

    LF’s certification exams include Certified Kubernetes Administrator, Certified Kubernetes Application Developer, Linux Foundation Certified SysAdmin, and Linux Foundation Certified Engineer.

    “ACG and LA both have excellent reputations for the quality of their open-source training content so we are pleased to see them come together to better serve the talent development needs of the open-source software ecosystem,” he added.

  • Last phase of the desktop wars?

    Economic pressure will be on Microsoft to deprecate the emulation layer. Partly because it’s entirely a cost center. Partly because they want to reduce the complexity cost of running Azure. Every increment of Windows/Linux convergence helps with that – reduces administration and the expected volume of support traffic.

    Eventually, Microsoft announces upcoming end-of-life on the Windows emulation. The OS itself , and its userland tools, has for some time already been Linux underneath a carefully preserved old-Windows UI. Third-party software providers stop shipping Windows binaries in favor of ELF binaries with a pure Linux API…

    …and Linux finally wins the desktop wars, not by displacing Windows but by co-opting it. Perhaps this is always how it had to be.

More on ESR

  • Linux winning battle against Windows

    Open-source advocate Eric Raymond thinks that Windows development will "inevitably" become a drag on Microsoft's business and Vole will switch to a Linux kernel.

    Raymond has been gazing at his crystal balls and thinks that a Microsoft corporate strategist will come up with the idea that Vole can save a fortune by making Windows a Proton-like emulation layer over a Linux kernel, with the layer getting thinner over time as more of the support lands in the mainline kernel sources.

    This would enable Vole to shed an ever-larger fraction of its development costs as less and less has to be done in-house.

Windows to become emulation layer atop Linux kernel

  • Windows to become emulation layer atop Linux kernel, predicts Eric Raymond

    That collection of ingredients, he argued, will collide with the fact that Azure is now Microsoft's cash cow while the declining PC market means that over time Microsoft will be less inclined to invest in Windows 10.

    "Looked at from the point of view of cold-blooded profit maximization, this means continuing Windows development is a thing Microsoft would prefer not to be doing," he wrote. "Instead, they'd do better putting more capital investment into Azure – which is widely rumored to be running more Linux instances than Windows these days."

"Outlandish Theory" from ESR

  • Outlandish Theory Suggests Microsoft Will Ditch Windows Kernel In Favor Of Linux

    Recently, an article entitled “Last phase of the desktop wars?” poses an interesting notion and question, that is both polarizing and provocative, regarding the future of Microsoft's OS strategy. What is next for Windows? As the author of the article, open source software developer and advocate Eric S. Raymond notes, Microsoft has added features to Windows to better align it with Linux. He also suggests that the divide between Linux and Windows could eventually shrink until the two operating systems essentially become one. As he puts it, Linux would win the desktop wars, “not by displacing Windows but by co-opting it. Perhaps this is always how it had to be.” However, is it truly how it “has to be,” or will Microsoft actually shift how Windows is developed and shared, in order to make it more profitable?

    [...]

    If the cost of developing Windows was to be scaled back, how would Microsoft do it? Raymond writes that the “third ingredient is Proton,” an emulation layer on top of Linux so user can run Windows games. Based on the conclusions presented, since this emulation layer exists, people clearly want some aspects of Windows on Linux. Furthermore, something like Proton could be modified to run other applications that are made for Windows. Thus, what does Microsoft do? Take over Proton’s market share and “Microsoft Windows becomes a Proton-like emulation layer over a Linux kernel.” Eventually, the emulation layer will “thin” out as apps become Linux-native, and Windows will just be Linux under the hood with emulation for “games and other legacy third-party software.”

Open source's Eric Raymond:..

  • Open source's Eric Raymond: Windows 10 will soon be just an emulation layer on Linux kernel

    Celebrated open-source software advocate and author Eric Raymond, who's long argued Linux will rule the desktop, reckons it won't be long before Windows 10 becomes an emulation layer over a Linux kernel.

    In 2002, he said Windows wouldn't be a viable profit engine for Microsoft once the price of a PC fell below $350. The "Microsoft tax" would eat into too much of OEMs' margins.

Could Linux Conquer Windows From Within?

SJVN

ESR again

  • Could Windows become part of Linux? This open source legend thinks so

    Over the past few years, Microsoft has wholeheartedly embraced Linux and open source which is why the developer and writer Eric S. Raymond (ESR) believes that the next version of Windows could end up running entirely on Linux.

    In a new blog post, ESR points to the fact that the software giant recently released its Windows System for Linux 2 (WSL2) and that it is currently porting its Edge browser to Linux as reasons why the company could one day retire the Windows kernel in favor of the Linux kernel.

FOSSBytes pushing "Microsoft loves Linux" lie again

  • Why Does Eric Raymond Think Windows Will Lose Desktop War To Linux?

    Last week, Eric Steven Raymond (often known as ESR) penned an article arguing that this could be the last phase of desktop wars and Linux will eventually win it gracefully. But how?

    As he observed, Linux will not replace Windows, instead, Windows will become an emulation layer on top of the Linux kernel.

Slashdot is not a megaphone of ZDNet, which says a lot about ./

Linux lovers are dreaming when they say Windows will lose...

  • Linux lovers are dreaming when they say Windows will lose desktop war

    As longtime tech reporter Robert Cringely, who knows the company through and through, told me in 2004: "Microsoft is about money, not innovation. They aren't opposed to innovation and like to be seen as innovators, but what really matters to them as a company is the money. Think of it that way and a lot of what they do starts to make sense.

    "When I give speeches (and why haven't I been asked to speak lately in Oz?) I like to pull out a US$S20 note and point out that there is something about that note that bothers [Microsoft co-founder] Bill Gates - that it is in my pocket. Microsoft really does want all the money and I'm not sure they won't get it."

    Following in Raymond's footsteps, ZDNet's Steven Vaughan-Nichols, who has been writing about Linux and open source for a long time, claimed that Raymond was "on to something".

    It is an indication that there is little cold, hard reasoning employed when people who have been in the business of open-source advocacy start making predictions.

    Would the development of Windows, the way Raymond has outlined — migrating the Windows interface to run on the Linux kernel — remove the major headache that Windows causes Microsoft: malware? The short answer is no.

Still pushing that "Microsoft Linux" nonsense...

Slashdot still pushing this whole "Linux is Microsoft/Windows"

Microsoft talking points

  • Even 2020 cannot bring forth the Year of Linux on the Desktop [Ed: Entertaining Microsoft moles in El Reg, with lots of lies and loaded statements]

    Microsoft MVP and Canonical engineer manager Hayden Barnes has upended the scorn bucket over the dreams of open sourcers that Windows might end up as an emulation layer atop Linux.

More of this nonsense fed by Slashdot

Short Topix: Could Microsoft Be Looking To Linux For...

  • Short Topix: Could Microsoft Be Looking To Linux For The Next Version Of Windows?

    I know ... it sounds like a horror film, huh? But TechRepublic's Jack Wallen and ZDNet's Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols both think it might be a good idea.

    I just know you're screaming at the top of your lungs about now.

    If you are like many Linux users, most of whom are Microsoft "refugees anyways, there are many, many reasons for your skepticism and fear. For years, Microsoft professed its intense hatred of Linux. They bragged about how they were planning to "eradicate the cancer known as Linux from the computing world.

    Then, almost overnight, Microsoft professed its "love for Linux. Microsoft joined the Linux Foundation. Linux users RAGED! The "enemy was making itself comfortable ... in their OWN HOUSE! Most Linux users were afraid that it was the same ol' Microsoft up to its usual games, which involved the "triple E threat: embrace, extend, extinguish. MICROSOFT WAS GOING TO EXTINGUISH LINUX FROM WITHIN!

    Actually, there are still many Linux users who haven't strayed far from initial assessment. Even in the PCLinuxOS forum, we hear it fairly regularly. Ignoring for a moment Microsoft's history of hatred towards Linux, can such a move possibly be all bad?

    We don't have to look far to see the possible benefits. Back in 1999, macOS was rebased, partly, on Berkley BSD, leading to Apple joining the *nix family. Anyone would be hard pressed to argue with the results of Mac OS X (we're not talking about the costs associated with Apple products/hardware, nor the restrictive closed environment that constrains Mac OS X).

    Believe it or not, Windows isn't the flagship Microsoft product any longer. It doesn't even come close to being a leading income producer for Microsoft. Instead, Microsoft finds its biggest profit leaders to be things like its cloud-based Office 365, and other "software-as-a-service (SaaS) products. Its Azure cloudspace is quite lucrative.

    Microsoft migrating Windows to Linux does make sense. Instead of having a whole bevy of programmers working on proprietary, closed-source software, most of the heavy lifting would have been done by the FOSS and Linux community. You can be certain that Microsoft will tinker with the final product. They literally can't help themselves in that regard.

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More in Tux Machines

LibreOffice 2021 Schedule Mobile App

The LibreOffice 2021 Schedule Mobile App is immediately available on Google Play and F-Droid. From the F-Droid page is also possible to download the APK, although by installing that way you will not receive update notifications. The mobile app, for Android smartphones and tablets, shows the conference schedule: by swiping right and left, the user can switch between the three rooms, while a drop down menu allows to chose one of the three days. By tapping on each of the talks, it is possible to star it to create a personal conference schedule, and to set an alarm to avoid losing the important presentations. Changes to the schedule will be immediately reflected on the mobile app, although it is always possible to force a refresh, and to show the latest changes. Read more

DXVK 1.9.2 Improves Pathfinder: Wrath of the Righteous, Need For Speed Heat, and Other Games

DXVK 1.9.2 is here almost two months after the DXVK 1.9.1 release and introduces more bug fixes to reduce overall CPU overhead in Direct3D 9 and address several issues, as well as to improve support for several Windows games that some of you might want to play on your favorite GNU/Linux distributions. Among these, there’s a fix for reflection rendering in Call of Cthulhu, a workaround for poor performance in the Crysis 3 and Homefront: The Revolution, improved gamma curve in GODS, a fix for incorrect rendering Fantasy Grounds, and a fix for blank screen in Paranormal Files. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Please Stop Closing Forums And Moving People To Discord

    A few days ago Eurogamer closed their forums, bringing to an end over 20 years of community discussion. The site explained the move like sites and companies always do (only a few are still using them), and it made sense the way it always does (that’s a lot of money for not much gain), but that doesn’t mean the process itself isn’t something that sucks.

  • Nokia has recommenced participation in the O-RAN Alliance

    The O-RAN Alliance said it became aware of concerns regarding some participants that may be subject to U.S. export regulations, and has been working with O-RAN participants to address these concerns. The O-RAN Board has approved changes to O-RAN participation documents and procedures. While it is up to each O-RAN participant to make their own evaluation of these changes, O-RAN is optimistic that the changes will address the concerns and facilitate O-RAN’s mission, the Alliance said.

  • Nokia and O-RAN: an unwavering commitment

    Nokia has long been a believer in – and champion of – open and interoperable technologies. We believe that Open RAN technology has the potential to enrich the mobile ecosystem with new solutions and business models, and an expanded multi-vendor ecosystem. This is what customers and consumers want – and it is something we are committed to seeing through.

  • Oil Has Multi-line Commands and String Literals

    In June's post Recent Progress on the Oil Language, I wrote that Oil has Python-like multi-line string literals, but enhanced like the Julia language.

    Here are examples from the Oil Language Tour.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • 5 DevSecOps myths, explained

    New ways of doing things tend to beget new myths and misunderstandings about those emerging methods. A common example: As newer work processes and cultures get popularized, people commonly begin to tout a single correct way to implement them. In all likelihood, though, there’s more than one “right” way to do it – and that’s true for DevSecOps, as it was with DevOps before it. Demystifying DevSecOps, then, is actually a meaningful (if not wholly necessary in some organizations) step toward a successful implementation. That’s because DevSecOps, like DevOps, is as much a matter of people and culture as anything else. As Red Hat associate principal solutions architect Mike Calizo wrote over at opensource.com, “DevSecOps encourages security practitioners to adapt and change their old existing security processes and procedures. This may sound easy, but changing processes, behavior, and culture is always difficult, especially in large environments.”

  • Red Hat's Upstream Contributions Are Making For A Great Fedora Workstation 35 - Phoronix

    Fedora Workstation 35 will hopefully be out at the end of October (currently the beta is running behind schedule) and when it does ship it's once again at the bleeding-edge of Linux features. Fedora Workstation 35 is shaping up to be another great release for those interested in a feature-rich desktop experience. Fedora Workstation 35 test builds have been working out great on the few systems I've tried so far in the lab. More Fedora Workstation 35 testing and benchmarks will be coming up in the weeks ahead. In anticipation of the upcoming Fedora 35 Beta, Red Hat's Christian Schaller once again published a new blog post outlining some of the big changes on the Fedora Workstation side for this six-month update.

  • Rajeesh K Nambiar: A new set of OpenType shaping rules for Malayalam script

    TLDR; research and development of a completely new OpenType layout rules for Malayalam traditional orthography. Writing OpenType shaping rules is hard. Writing OpenType shaping rules for advanced (complex) scripts is harder. Writing OpenType shaping rules without causing any undesired ligature formations is even harder.

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 13 September 1300 UTC
  • Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 27 September 1300 UTC