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L4L interviews VP of Appgen Tech

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Software

L4L: We test-drove MyBooks at Lobby4Linux. It appears that you guys haven’t missed anything with this application. Tell me a bit about your marketing strategy.

JM: As you can see, MyBooks is a Java-based app so it offers most all platforms a way to implement and execute. See, that’s the beauty of MyBooks. The program and the data are portable to Linux, Mac and Windows without any data loss. You can access your data from any Internet-driven terminal. I have read on your website about how you are trying to get such a program developed for Linux. Well, here we are. Our strongest marketing point is exactly that. You can use MyBooks with virtually any platform. Since transferring QuickBooks data from Windows to Linux is no longer a problem, Linux users who found themselves still dependent upon Windows for the use of QuickBooks can now fully migrate to Linux and not look back.

L4L: Look into your crystal ball and tell me what you see. Give me the prognosis for Appgen and specifically, MyBooks Pro. Tell me what MyBooks Pro is and is not.

JM: OK, remember…you asked for it. MyBooks Pro is a “total business lifecycle” system. From small businesses all the way up to Fortune 500 and up…on the same database and core accounting foundation.

MyBooks Pro is able to be customized for virtually any business type. As the business grows and changes, so can the application. This is key. You never, ever lose your valuable data and history. That has been the problem faced by businesses wanting to fully migrate to Linux. Either a stopping point had to be made in QuickBooks and a starting point made in the Linux accounting app, or all that data had to be manually entered into the new Linux system. Either way was unacceptable to most businesses. Why keep two accounting systems on two platforms? MyBooks Pro solves that problem. In fact, the last thing most business do is transfer their data from QuickBooks to MyBooks Pro before they reformat the hard drive to prepare for full Linux migration.

Full Interview.

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