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Raspberry Pis and Arduino Projects

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Hardware
  • Xen Project officially ports its hypervisor to Raspberry Pi 4

    The idea to do an official port bubbled up from the Xen community and then reached the desk of George Dunlap, chairman of the Xen Project’s Advisory Board. Dunlap mentioned the idea to an acquaintance who works at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and was told that around 40 percent of Pis are sold to business users rather than hobbyists.

    With more than 30 million Arm-based Pis sold as of December 2019, and sales running at a brisk 600,000-plus a month in April 2020, according to Pi guy Eben Upton, Dunlap saw an opportunity to continue Xen’s drive towards embedded and industrial applications.

    Stefano Stabellini, who by day works at FPGA outfit Xilinx, and past Apache Foundation director Roman Shaposhnik took on the task of the port. The pair clocked that the RPi 4's system-on-chip used a regular GIC-400 interrupt controller, which Xen supports out of the box, and thought this was a sign this would, overall, be an easy enough job. That, the duo admitted, was dangerous optimism. Forget the IRQs, there was a whole world of physical and virtual memory addresses to navigate.

    The pair were “utterly oblivious that we were about to embark on an adventure deep in the belly of the Xen memory allocator and Linux address translation layers,” we're told.

    “The first hurdle was the availability of low memory addresses,” the pair wrote in an announcement heralding the Xen Pi port, seen by The Register ahead of its public release today. “RPi4 has devices that can only access the first 1GB of RAM. The amount of memory below 1GB in Dom0 was not enough. Julien Grall solved this problem with a simple one-line fix to increase the memory allocation below 1GB for Dom0 on RPi4. The patch is now present in Xen 4.14.”

  • Xen Project Officially Ports Its Hypervisor To Raspberry Pi 4
  • Xen on Raspberry Pi 4 adventures

    Raspberry Pi (RPi) has been a key enabling device for the Arm community for years, given the low price and widespread adoption. According to the RPi Foundation, over 35 million have been sold, with 44% of these sold into industry. We have always been eager to get the Xen hypervisor running on it, but technical differences between RPi and other Arm platforms made it impractical for the longest time. Specifically, a non-standard interrupt controller without virtualization support.

    Then the Raspberry Pi 4 came along, together with a regular GIC-400 interrupt controller that Xen supports out of the box. Finally, we could run Xen on an RPi device. Soon Roman Shaposhnik of Project EVE and a few other community members started asking about it on the xen-devel mailing list. “It should be easy,” we answered. “It might even work out of the box,” we wrote in our reply. We were utterly oblivious that we were about to embark on an adventure deep in the belly of the Xen memory allocator and Linux address translation layers.

  • Raspberry Pi CM3+ based Iono Pi Max industrial controller comes with an impressive number of I/Os

    As the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 is only expected for next year, companies are still launching products based on Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ (CM3+), and Sfera Labs has just introduced Iono Pi Max industrial computer powered by a Raspberry Pi CM3+ system-on-module.

    Housed in a DIN rail enclosure, the Linux controller offers Fast Ethernet, three USB ports, isolated CAN and serial boards, some analog I/Os, a relay, as well as a real-time clock (RTC), integrated UPS, and more.

  • FPGA Meets Breadboard with Mercury 2 Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA Development Board

    All those boards are however based on entry-level FPGAs like Lattice Semi ICE40 or QuickLogic EOS S3, and if you’d like a more powerful FPGA board that fits into a breadboard, MicroNova Mercury 2 development board may meet your requirements with a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA.

    [...]

    The baseboard comes with a 64-bit socket for the FPGA devboard, as well as a 4-digit seven-segment display, four push-buttons & eight toggle switches, a PS/2! port for keyboard or mouse, a VGA port, a Pmod-compatible connector, 3.5mm audio jacks, an analog temperature sensor, a light sensor, and a potentiometer for use with the analog-to-digital converter.

  • How a Half-Dozen Raspberry Pis Help Keep This Maine Oyster Farm Afloat

    Running Tide built a 60-by-24-foot oyster processing boat, now docked in a finger of Casco Bay in the town of Harpswell, with two oyster reefs floating at each end of the vessel. Inside the processing boat are a half-dozen Raspberry Pis that feed data to the cloud on water conditions, including temperature and acidity. The boat is essentially a huge catamaran that allows the 11-by-36-foot oyster reefs to float into it.

    Running Tide’s Margaux Filippi, who has a PhD. from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, said the company is working on underwater video cameras to monitor the oysters’ growth. The 29-year-old data scientist has built machine learning algorithms for ocean research and spent six years at MIT’s mechanical engineering department, where she mastered the process of rapid prototyping. She clearly enjoys Running Tide’s hacker culture.

  • Watch your houseplant’s growth really take off in this Saturn V planter

    A switch on the front lights up the printed flame assemblies emanating from the engines, using a trio of SMD LEDs on each exhaust. These LEDs are controlled by an Arduino Nano nestled inside the wooden base to produce random lighting effects when an activation button is pressed.

  • This interactive screen slides smoothly from side to side

    When you need to grab someone’s attention at an event, an interactive screen is a good idea. MakerMan, however, went several steps beyond this, creating an installation with a bank of static screens that depict the Moscow skyline. In front of this, a single touch-enabled display moves back and forth automatically to present information on various points of interest.

    Sliding action is handled by a large stepper motor, which pulls the screen along on a carriage assembly. The motor, in turn, is controlled via an Arduino Uno and a stepper driver. All of these electronics are hidden behind a nicely painted wooden facade, letting the technology driving it fade elegantly into the background.

More on RasPi

Xen: Our hypervisor now runs on Raspberry Pi 4

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa, Vulkan and AMD

  • Mesa Just Got A Significant Performance Boost For Intel Tiger Lake Chips

    Intel's Kenneth Graunke has written a few patches for Intel Gen12+ graphics chips that boost graphics performance by one to twelve percent. Don't get too excited, it only applies to Intel Tigerlake and newer and they won't arrive in mainstream GNU/Linux distributions until Mesa 20.3 is released mid-December.

  • The Vulkan driver for Raspberry Pi 4 becomes official for Linux, merged into Mesa | GamingOnLinux

    In case you've missed what's been going on, the progress on proper Vulkan support for the Raspberry Pi 4 has been going really well. So well in fact, that it's been merged into the upstream Mesa project and so it's all a bit more official. Writing in a guest post on the official Raspberry Pi blog, Igalia's Iago Toral, who has been largely responsible for hacking away on the v3dv driver gave an update on the progress. [...] Plenty more still to be done, and as they said, passing tests is one thing but real-world use is another. I've no doubt people will find many ways to break it while it's still in development. That's part of the point of being official in Mesa now though, makes it vastly easy to try it. As a proud owner of a Raspberry Pi 4, it's going to be fun to see it in action with Vulkan now.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 Is Released With A New Vulkan Extension And Three Game-Specific Fixes - LinuxReviews

    AMD has released a new version of their AMDVLK Vulkan driver for Linux with support for one new Vulkan extensions and game-specific fixes for Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, Second Extinction and X-plane. Performance is still overall worse than the AMD RAVD Vulkan driver that comes with Mesa 20.2.0 and performance is much worse in specific graphics benchmarks and image up-scaling. [...] AMDVLK's performance has long been sub-par compared to Mesa's RADV driver. That's the driver GNU/Linux distributions ship with, AMDVLK is optional. AMDVLK is much closer to the Windows-driver than Mesa's RADV and compatibility may be a reason to install the latest and greatest AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 driver. Performance is, as you will see if you read on, not a reason to install it.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 Released With Various Game Fixes - Phoronix

    AMD has issued their first open-source Vulkan driver code drop of the quarter with AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1. The main changes of AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 are updating against the Vulkan API 1.2.156 revision and enabling support for VK_EXT_shader_image_atomic_int64. VK_EXT_shader_image_atomic_int64 allows for 64-bit integer atomic operations to work on images.

Games: Humble Bundle, Stadia, Amnesia: Rebirth, Steam Proton

  • Get some thrills on in the latest Humble Bundle with DUSK and Detention | GamingOnLinux

    Need to boost your library ready for Halloween? Humble Bundle are back with some cheap thrills for you. As usual, we will highlight those with Linux support / Linux builds in bold text to make it easy at a glance.

  • Stadia gets PAC-MAN 64-player Battle Royale, Jedi: Fallen Order soon and HUMANKIND beta | GamingOnLinux

    When Google started hyping up three days of announcements and demos, it has probably disappointed many that the first day was PAC-MAN. That's right, after Stadia got an exclusive Bomberman Battle Royale, it's now getting PAC-MAN Mega Tunnel Battle, a 64-player last-pac standing game. There's a demo available right now, which anyone can register for a Stadia account to hop in and try it (Stadia Pro not needed). Surprisingly, it's actually pretty good. Sounds like it might be Stadia exclusive at release too on November 17.

  • The latest horror from Frictional Games with Amnesia: Rebirth is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Frictional Games have now released their latest horror title with Amnesia: Rebirth, as you walk in the shoes of Tasi and guide them through an emotional experience. Using the same game engine as their previous game SOMA, which they call HPL3, Amnesia: Rebirth is a horror game that focuses on the journey as much as the end. It's all about the narrative and sinking into the thick atmosphere, Frictional say to not go in aiming to beat it but rather to immerse yourself in the world. Rebirth has a direct connection to Amnesia: The Dark Descent, however it's a fully stand-alone experience so you don't actually need to have played any others.

  • Steam Proton Updated To 5.13 Making Red Dead Redemption 2 Playable On Linux

    Linux users are simply some of the most stubborn users in the world, willing to forgo almost any convenience in exchange for keeping themselves both secure, and in absolute control of their operating system. Whereas Microsoft has attempted to further dummy-proof Windows 10 (bringing about a disastrous ‘software as a service’ routine with consistent updates and changes to everything with little to no warning), Linux is on the far other end of the spectrum where files and configurations rely a bit more on the user understand what they’re doing, rather than intelligent installers doing the necessary heavy lifting. If it’s a toss-up between the two, Linux is strongly recommended for the more tech-savvy users. If you’re keener, however, to ensure that you can play all of the latest games and popular tools, then Windows is likely the answer even with its arguably draconian policies and bloat-ware shoveling.

You can Surf Internet in Linux Terminal With These Command Line Browsers

I’m guessing that you are probably using Firefox or a Chrome-based browser like Brave to read this article. Or, maybe, Google Chrome or Chromium. In other words, you are utilizing a GUI-based approach to browse the web. However, back in the days, people used the terminal to fetch resources and browse the web because everything was mostly text-based information. Even though you cannot get every information from a terminal now, you can still try the command line browsers for some text-based information and open a web page from the Linux terminal. Not just limited to that, but if you are accessing a remote server or stuck in a terminal without a GUI, a terminal web browser can prove to be useful as well. So, in this article, I will be mentioning some terminal based web browsers that you can try on Linux. Read more

Tails 4.12 is out

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible. Read more