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Linux on a Plane: What a Pain!

Filed under
Linux

My wife and I recently came back from a business trip from Paris, and even though we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves, it was a long week of living out of a suitcase, and when we boarded the plane after twelve security checks in the airport, we were both ready to try to relax and not think about the jetlag that would result from our long flight back home. Thankfully, when we were walking to our confined torture seats, I noticed that every seat on the plane had a touch screen display that could be used to watch movies and television shows, play games, and listen to music, which was not the case on our flight out to Paris. Obviously, this was a welcome sight, but when I finally sat down in my seat, I knew that I was going to be in for an interesting flight.

You see, while everyone else on the plane appeared to have a fully functioning display, I was left with a black and white boot screen of doom that documented some errors that prevented the system from properly starting up. The operating system? Linux. The distribution? Red Hat. Yes, out of all the people on the plane, I was the one left with a Linux failure, which just couldn’t have been more appropriate. I realized the irony of the situation, and this amusement pushed aside the frustration for a short amount of time.

Part of the error message literally said something like:

"Can’t identify FLASH, sorry, man 89..."

Full Story.

Disagree with the conclusion.

I fail to see how this guy reaches the conclusion that Windows would be a better OS than Linux for this scenario.

Bad applications can be written for any OS.

I could say the same about my cable box at home which is running VxWorks. This is an OS which is specifically designed for embedded systems and yet my cable box is slow and crashy. At work we use VxWorks for airbourne software and as you can imagine, a crash in this scenario is completely unacceptable.

He does not state which airline it is but Virgin have implemented their in-flight entertainment system on Linux for their Airbus fleet. I'm sure that if Linux wasn't up to the job, Virgin would not be installing it

Virgin Red

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