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Review: dyne:bolic 2.4.2

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Linux
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This distribution is about more than creating another version of Linux. It has a strong political and philosophical impetus behind it. I will let their website explain it:

dyne:bolic is RASTA software released free under the GNU General Public License.

This software is about Digital Resistance ina babylon world which tries to control the way we communicate, we share our interests and knowledge.

The roots of the Rastafari movement are in resistance to slavery: this software is one step in the struggle for Redemption and Freedom from proprietary and closed-source software.

The distribution also aims to be media centric, with many audio, video and graphics applications. Once again, from their site:

dyne:bolic is shaped on the needs of media activists, artists and creatives as a practical tool for multimedia production: you can manipulate and broadcast both sound and video with tools to record, edit, encode and stream, having automatically recognized most device and peripherals: audio, video, TV, network cards, firewire, usb and more; all using only free software!

Dyne:bolic is a live CD distro that you can install or save your own personalized configuration to a USB memory stick. The distribution is designed to make it easy to take your OS with you wherever you go.

So let’s give it a try.

The First Boot

Ok here I will say the first time I tried dyne:bolic was 2.4.1 that was released a few days before 2.4.2. I booted the CD in my desktop and X was completely broke. It wouldn’t start up and there was a bunch of “file/command not found” errors. I tried it on the MacBook Pro, and once again, it didn’t work. I figured it must have been a bad release. Sure enough a day or two later 2.4.2 came out. I burned a fresh CD and popped it in my desktop.

Full Story.

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