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Canonical Introducing HA MicroK8s

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  • Introducing HA MicroK8s, the ultra-reliable, minimal Kubernetes | Ubuntu

    Canonical today announced autonomous high availability (HA) clustering in MicroK8s, the lightweight Kubernetes. Already popular for IoT and developer workstations, MicroK8s now gains resilience for production workloads in cloud and server deployments.

    High availability is enabled automatically once three or more nodes are clustered, and the data store migrates automatically between nodes to maintain quorum in the event of a failure. “The autonomous HA MicroK8s delivers a zero-ops experience that is perfect for distributed micro clouds and busy administrators”, says Alex Chalkias, Product Manager at Canonical.

    Designed as a minimal conformant Kubernetes, MicroK8s installs and clusters with a single command.

  • Canonical introduces high-availability Micro-Kubernetes | ZDNet

    If you've been hiding under a rock -- and who could blame you these days? -- you may have missed how totally Kubernetes now dominates container orchestration. One way to quickly get up to speed on Kubernetes is with Canonical's  MicroK8s. This is an easy-to-run and install mini-version of Kubernetes. And now Canonical has added autonomous high availability (HA) clustering to it. 

    Seriously.

  • Canonical Announces HA MicroK8s

    MicroK8s, already popular for IoT and developer workstations, now gains resilience for production workloads in cloud and server deployments. Canonical has announced autonomous high availability (HA) clustering in MicroK8s, the lightweight Kubernetes.

Lightweight Kubernetes Pushes Orchestrator to the Edge

  • Lightweight Kubernetes Pushes Orchestrator to the Edge

    Kubernetes, the evolving cluster orchestrator, has gone on a diet, stepping off the scales as a lightweight, resilient clustering tool that switches to autopilot once three or more nodes are clustered.

    The slimmed-down version dubbed MicroK8s automatically migrates stored data between nodes to maintain a “quorum” in the event of a production failure, Canonical said this week in unveiling the micro-version of Kubernetes. The Ubuntu OS publisher aims MicroK8 at production workloads increasingly running in cloud and server deployments.

    Given the complexities of deploying Kubernetes in production, Canonical is stressing its lightweight version as a “zero-ops” alternative for maintaining cloud-based microservices and micro datacenters used for edge computing applications.

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