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Google Coral Dev Board mini SBC is now available for $100

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Linux
Google
Hardware
Debian

Google Coral SBC was the first development board with Google Edge TPU. The AI accelerator was combined with an NXP i.MX 8M quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 processor and 1GB RAM to provide an all-in-all AI edge computing platform. It launched for $175, and now still retails for $160 which may not be affordable to students and hobbyists.

[...]

The board runs Debian based Mendel Linux distribution developed by Google for Coral boards and supports TensorFlow Lite and AutoML Vision Edge with the latter enabling “fast, high-accuracy custom image classification models”.

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Google’s Dev Board Mini SBC launches for $100

  • Google’s Dev Board Mini SBC launches for $100

    Seeed has opened $100 pre-orders on Google’s “Coral Dev Board Mini,” which runs Linux on a quad -A35 MediaTek 8167s along with a 4-TOPS Edge TPU. The Mini supplies 2GB LPDDR3, 8GB eMMC, WiFi/BT, micro-HDMI, MIPI-DSI/CSI, 2x Type-C, and 40-pin GPIO.

    In January, Google announced a stripped down Coral Dev Board Mini version of its Coral Dev Board, as well as a solderable Coral Accelerator Module implementation of Google’s 4-TOPS Edge TPU. Now Seeed has opened $100 pre-orders on the Mini along with a pre-soldered Coral Accelerator Module, with shipments starting at the end of the month.

Google's $100 Linux Coral Dev Board mini quietly launches

  • Google's $100 Linux Coral Dev Board mini quietly launches – but sells out fast

    Google's Coral Dev Board mini has made a tantalizingly brief appearance for pre-order for $100 on Seeed's website – but stocks are already sold out, according to the company.

    Google unveiled its Linux Coral Dev Board mini in January, offering developers a smaller, cheaper and lower-power version of the Coral Dev Board, which launched for $149 but now costs $129.

    Instead of an NXP system on chip (SoC), the Mini combines the new Coral Accelerator Module with a MediaTek 8167s SoC, which consists of a quad-core Arm Cortex-A35 CPU.

    It also features an IMG PowerVR GE8300 GPU that's integrated in the SoC, while the machine-learning accelerator consists of the Google Edge TPU coprocessor that's capable of performing four trillion operations per second (TOPS) or two TOPS per watt.

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