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Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

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Hardware

  • Gumstix Introduces CM4 to CM3 Adapter, Carrier Boards for Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

    Raspberry Pi Trading has just launched 32 different models of Raspberry Pi CM4 and CM4Lite systems-on-module, as well as the “IO board” carrier board.

    But the company has also worked with third-parties, and Gumstix, an Altium company, has unveiled four different carrier boards for the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4, as well as a convenient CM4 to CM3 adapter board that enables the use of Raspberry Pi CM4 on all/most carrier boards for the Compute Module 3/3+.

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  • Raspberry Pi CM4 and CM4Lite Modules Launched for $25 and Up

    We were expecting Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 sometimes next year, but Raspberry Pi Trading Limited managed to launch the new module much earlier, as Raspberry Pi CM4 and CM4Lite modules have just been launched with a new, much more compact form factor incompatible with the earlier Compute Modules, an I/O board making use of the new features, and a choice of 32 models with variations in terms of memory and storage capacity, as well as the presence or lack thereof of a WiFi and Bluetooth wireless module.

Raspberry Pi CM4 launches with smaller footprint

  • Raspberry Pi CM4 launches with smaller footprint, quad -A72 CPU, and optional WiFi

    The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 starts at $25 with the same quad -A72 SoC as the RPi 4 plus up to 8GB RAM and 32GB eMMC, optional 802.11ac, and support for dual 4K HDMI, GbE, and PCIe 2.0.

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation is getting ahead of itself. First, there was the surprise Raspberry Pi 4 Model B launch in June 2019 after hints about a 2020 launch, followed by a surprise 8GB RAM RPi 4 model in May of this year. Now, after indications that the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 (CM4) would not arrive until 2021, the module has launched starting at the same $25 price, but with up to 8GB RAM and the same Broadcom BCM2711 SoC with 4x 1.5GHz Cortex-A72 cores found on the RPi 4. Earlier Compute Modules topped out at 1GB LPDDR2.

Customizable carrier boards showcase Raspberry Pi CM4

  • Customizable carrier boards showcase Raspberry Pi CM4

    Gumstix has launched six carriers featuring the Raspberry Pi CM4, some of which offer Google’s Edge TPU. A CM4 Dev Board is joined by boards for robotics, Pixhawk drones, PoE smart imaging, and conversion to CM3-based carriers.

    Long-time embedded Linux vendor Gumstix, which is now owned by Altium, has jumped all over the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 (CM4) with a sextet of carrier boards that can be customized by the Geppetto online development service. Two of the boards are equipped with Google’s Edge TPU AI accelerator.

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 on sale now from $25

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Review

  • The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Review

    But today, that all changes with the fourth generation of the compute module, the Compute Module 4! Here's a size comparison with the previous-generation Compute Module 3+, some other common Pi models, and an SD and microSD card (remember when the original Pi used a full-size SD card?): [...]

Discussing Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

Designing the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

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